just got a power macintosh 7500

Discussion in 'Apple Collectors' started by mrkramer, Dec 17, 2007.

  1. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    Jul 11, 2006
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    #1
    I got a free Power Macintosh 7500 today. I am not totally sure what I am going to use it for other than maybe some old games. It's running some version of system 7. There are a few things that I would like to know how do I get the case open if I want to upgrade anything. Also the mouse that I got with it will move the cursor around the screen but when I try to click nothing happens, I'm assuming that the mouse is bad. does anybody here happen to have an Apple ADB mouse that I could get for cheap, or know where I could get one?

    I'll also take suggetions for a useful purpose for it.
     
  2. dpaanlka macrumors 601

    dpaanlka

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Location:
    Illinois
    #2
    Go to System 7 Today and you'll find lots of useful purposes. Some ideas:

    Word Processing
    Games
    Web/File/FTP Server
    Music Server
    SSH Terminal
    Cool retro thing to have around.

    There are some upgrades you can get for that for extra coolness, such as G3 upgrades, Rage or Radeon cards, even an older FireWire card will work.

    http://everymac.com/systems/apple/powermac/stats/powermac_7500_100.html

    A 100mhz 601 is a pretty lousy performer. For $49.95 you can get a brand new 500mhz G3 here: http://store1.sonnettech.com/product_info.php?cPath=22_29&products_id=44

    eBay is a good source for used things.

    EDIT: You can also find tons of crap for it here:

    http://forums.info-mac.org/viewforum.php?f=94

    (sorry mods for all the shameless plugs)
     
  3. mrkramer thread starter macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #3
    I've gone to system7today, and it is a great site. thanks for the other links, and upgrade recomendations, i'll check them out. Also how much Ram can this computer use?
     
  4. dpaanlka macrumors 601

    dpaanlka

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    #4
    A gig, using eight 128 MB modules. Here's some for $19 a piece:

    http://eshop.macsales.com/item/Other World Computing/5MD128MBG/

    Although a gig is overkill for System 7. 128 MB alone would be more than enough. System 7 was designed to run on systems with like 12 MB of memory.
     
  5. mrkramer thread starter macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #5
    just one more question, what type of HDD did these use, I may want to upgrade the current 1GB drive.
     
  6. dpaanlka macrumors 601

    dpaanlka

    Joined:
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    Illinois
    #6
    50 pin narrow SCSI is built in. Any 50 pin narrow SCSI drive should work. You can also use 68 pin wide SCSI drives with an adapter, I have done so on both PCI and NuBus Macs (a 7500 is a PCI).

    You can also get a PCI SATA card and use any SATA drive. Sonnet makes this card which "requires" Mac OS 8.0 but should work with at least Mac OS 7.6.1, although I haven't been able to verify that (I plan to eventually).

    PATA (IDE) drives wont work without a PCI ATA card, but I would stay away from that.

    I would just stick with finding a larger SCSI drive and save yourself the hassle of finding a card.
     
  7. RacerX macrumors 65832

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    #7
    The Power Macintosh 7500 is a great system! I loved using mine until I got my second 8600/300 (which took it's place among my main systems).

    As for suggestions, I can outline what I used mine for at different times...
    (1) Mac OS X Server (Rhapsody) workstation: I replaced the original PowerPC 601 processor card at 100 MHz with a PowerPC 604e processor card at 210 MHz, upgraded the cache to 256k, the memory to 512 MB and the video memory to 4 MB (and later put in a couple 8 MB video cards). In this configuration I was able to run Rhapsody 5.6 (Mac OS X Server 1.2) and a number of graphics apps quite well, and it also did quite nicely at running older Mac apps in Blue Box (sorta like Classic).

    It was replaced in this role by an 8600 with a PowerPC 604eV at 300 MHz (with 1 MB of L2 cache), 412 MB of memory, a ATI Rage 128 video card (16 MB of video memory) and 4 MB of on board video memory (powering the two 17" displays that were originally on the 7500).

    (2) Classic Apps and Video Capture System: When running System 7.x or Mac OS 8.x, the built-in video capture equipment becomes available to video editing applications. As with the other systems of that generation, video capture is done by sharing onboard memory with any displays connected to the built-in video port. I put in two video cards (to power two Apple 16" displays), so all of the 4 MB of video memory was dedicated to video capture. Add in a G3 upgrade card (for post capture compression) and connect it to a VCR and/or DVD player and you can start capturing video. I've captured a ton of movies and TV shows at 320x240 at 15 frames per second. The only short coming is capture space, I have a 9 GB hard drive, so I tend to be limited to capturing about 10 minutes of video at a time (I get a majority of the space back after the post compression is completed). Once I've captured all the segments I need, I edit them together into a single QuickTime movie.

    It was replaced in this capacity when I got a second 8600. The main reason (though I haven't yet done it) was to have more room for additional hard drives and a bay for my SCSI CD burner. As I don't actually watch any of the captured movies on my 8600, I don't keep any of them on there either. Once I've finished capturing a movie or TV show I transfer it to my PowerMac G4 which has about 500 GB of drive space.​
    Really, when you think about it, the sky is the limit with the 7500. You can max out the memory to 1 GB, add in an ATA card and larger (and cheeper) ATA drives, swap out the processor card with either a G3 or G4 card, and max out the onboard video memory and put in a video card for video capture... the system just has tons of potential.

    As for video apps, I got Adobe Premiere 5.1 on ebay for $25, but actually use Strata Videoshop 3.0 (which I got for free with a MacAddict magazine almost 10 years ago) for most everything I do. Most of the pre-Mac OS X apps are going for dirt cheep on ebay these days... I just picked up Adobe FrameMaker 6.0 for under $20 last month.

    I'm telling ya, for next to nothing you can do almost anything you could want using a 7500 as a foundation. And these days it's biggest asset is the fact that people have no idea what can be done with older hardware and software, so they are practically giving these stuff away!

    And pretty much anything you could do on either a PowerBook 3400c (or 2400c) you can do on a 7500, so the list of stuff I have on my 3400c (here) is just as valid for a 7500 outfitted just right.
     
  8. mrkramer thread starter macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #8
    RacerX I was looking at the other thread you linked to, which software did you use for the animation clip that you made?
     
  9. RacerX macrumors 65832

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    #9
    The opening and closing graphics were done in Photoshop (I didn't use anything that didn't already exist as of Photoshop 5, though I had used Photoshop 7 for those). The 3D modeling was done using StrataVision 3D 4.0 (which I got for free with a MacAddict back in 1997), though I had moved to Strata Studio Pro 1.5.2 by the time I made that clip (which I got on ebay for around $25... mainly for the printed documentation). Both of those apps are from 1994. The video editing and explosion compositing were done in Strata VideoShop 3.0 and the laser beam was done with Strata MediaPaint 1.1.2 (also free with a MacAddict back in 1999).

    As with most video editing software, the export codecs come directly from QuickTime, and because I'm using Mac OS 8.6 on my older systems, I have access to all of the codecs that came with QuickTime 6 (including MPEG 4, though I personally tend to stick with Sorenson Video 3 for most of my projects... which was included in QuickTime 5 which is available for Mac OS 7.x as I recall).

    This is the second time I've attempted a laser beam effect in a video, the first time I added the beams using Flash 5 which was actually easier to work with than MediaPaint. Oddly, I don't generally use Flash 5 for making my "flash" projects as I find Adobe LiveMotion 1.0 (which has an interface based on AfterEffects) much easier for most of that stuff. Unfortunately, LiveMotion didn't get the "export to QuickTime" ability until version 2.0, which actually runs much better in Mac OS X than Mac OS 8/9.

    But yeah, other than Photoshop, all the apps I used for that were free. And come to think of it, I really didn't need to use Photoshop at all, as I could have done all the same stuff using Corel Graphics 8 LE (which is also free).

    Ya gotta love this stuff... free (or practically free) software that runs on inexpensive (nearly free) hardware and is easy to use, easy to learn, and puts out quality documents (for print, web or video). And the 7500 makes the perfect foundation to build all of this on top of.

    If I had to start from scratch (no software or hardware) and needed to put together a system that would start earning me money as quickly as possible, I'd most likely turn to the 7500 (or at least that generation of Power Macintosh) to get started. In a matter of a couple weeks at the cost of a few pizzas, I'd be back up and running again. :D
     

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