Just got my first "Gray Screen." Should I be worried?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by mrat93, Jun 22, 2010.

  1. mrat93 macrumors 65816

    mrat93

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    #1
    I've had my aluminum iMac since September 2007. Never had to take it in for repairs or anything. Today, while streaming a flash movie online (that I own, but can't find) from a site full of Flash advertisements, gray shaded the screen, and I got the dreaded "You need to restart your computer" screen.

    Should I be worried about this, or did it just happen because of the overload of Flash that my iMac was processing? Thanks guys.
     
  2. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Location:
    Canada, eh?
    #2
    Could be. Could be any number of things. If it only happens once in a rare while, then just reboot and move on. If it starts to happen a lot, then you've got a problem.
     
  3. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #3
    I would be. I haven't seen a kernel panic in years and they're usually related to hardware failure.

    Is everything up to date?
     
  4. mrat93 thread starter macrumors 65816

    mrat93

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    #4
    I just upgraded from 10.6.3 to 10.6.4. I've been using the computer for an hour or so now. No problems whatsoever.
     
  5. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #5
    Other than the kernel panic...
     
  6. soley macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2010
    #6
    facepalm.jpg

    OP, don't listen to this guy. If anything, I'd just check permissions on the OS. Most likely, you're fine.
     
  7. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #7
    I wouldn't worry about it. This happens to all computers, its just a lot more rare on a mac than it is on a win machine.
     
  8. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #8
    You say I deserve a facepalm, but you tell the OP to check permissions? Permissions issues would be a ridiculous and extremely unlikely cause of a kernel panic.
     
  9. dirt farmer macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    #9
    I agree with Jimbo on this one. Kernel panics are almost always hardware (bad Ram, logic board, etc.) related.
     
  10. GFLPraxis macrumors 604

    GFLPraxis

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    #10
    I haven't seen a Kernel panic on 2-3 years, on either my MacBook or Hackintosh. I remember an issue about four years back I had with a PowerBook with a loose internal Airport card that would Kernel Panic if you jolted it...

    It's usually a hardware problem, but occasionally software. If software, a permissions repair usually fixes it.
     
  11. mrchinchilla macrumors 6502

    mrchinchilla

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    #11
    Stop worrying the poor OP with potential hardware problems.
    Take a look at this: http://www.index-site.com/kernelpanic.html note hardware is mentioned once at the end.
    Take no notice of it, OP, unless it becomes a regular occurrence.
     
  12. Detrius macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2008
    Location:
    Asheville, NC
    #12
    Bad drivers are hardware-related, since they run the hardware, but that doesn't mean it's bad hardware.

    I concur that repairing permissions isn't going to do anything to help with kernel panics. I also concur that it happening once isn't a bad sign. If it happens several more times this week, that's really bad.
     
  13. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland.
    #13
    On my MacBook Pro, I used to get very regular kernel panics. If I watched a long Flash movie, I was almost guaranteed to get one - I believe it was due to overheating problems.

    I wiped & reinstalled it (upgrading to 10.6 in the process) and things improved a lot. I still got one kernel panic while watching a movie, so I bought a USB cooling pad to see if that made a difference. After trying that, I haven't had a single kernel panic since.

    I would reckon many kernel panics are hardware related, either overheating or a problem with faulty, or incorrectly seated RAM.
     
  14. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Location:
    Canada, eh?
    #14
    A kernel panic happens when, as the name implies, the OS kernel gets into an error state that it has no idea what to do. Usually the software is designed to handle error states, but in modern multi-threaded systems with varieties of hardware configurations, occasionally, things happen.

    To use a vehicle analogy, a kernel panic is the equivalent of having a car accident. Sometimes, there's no real explanation other than, you were in the wrong place at the wrong time. Too many cars to keep track of, one of them made a mistake, you weren't able to correct for it -- boom.

    On the other hand, if you get in your car and find that you are crashing it twice a week, then it's time to stop and ask what's going on. Maybe you have a stuck accelerator pedal, or faulty brakes, or some other hardware issue.
     
  15. mrchinchilla macrumors 6502

    mrchinchilla

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    #15
    Or you're a bad driver. ;)
     

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