JVC GZ-MG505 and Macbook Pro

richardhurst

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 19, 2006
8
0
Hi guy's sorry for sounding dumb but don't slate me please. i have a macbook pro and would like to get the above camcorder, but can't seem to find if it is compatible with the macbook pro, the software that comes with it is the capty mpeg edit ex which say's it works with powerpc but does not mention the intel based macbook pros. Will it work ok and will i have to use the software first to convert the movie then use imovie or will imovie recognize the camcorder straight away?. if it's too much hassle what hard drive based camcorder around the £700 or less mark do you recommend that will work with imovie. many many thanks for all help that can be given.:)
 

hvfsl

macrumors 68000
Jul 9, 2001
1,795
100
London, UK
I can't awnser the first part of your question, but as for the second part. I would recommend getting a 3CCD DV (tape) camcorder from someone like Sony over a Hard Disk camcorder. Because of the compression used on Hard Disk camcorders, the image quality generally isn't as good as standard DV camcorders.

Plus DV camcorders are much easier to use, you just plug them into your Mac and capture the video. No having to mess around with finding software that can convert it.
 

LethalWolfe

macrumors G3
Jan 11, 2002
9,368
119
Los Angeles
I second what hvfsl says. Cameras that record MPEG2 straight to a MiniDVD or a HDD offer less image quality and more headaches (you'll have to transcode all the footage into either MPEG4 or DV to use it w/iMovie) than a DV camera.


Lethal
 

richardhurst

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 19, 2006
8
0
Thanks for your comments. can anyone recommend a good camera i can look at that is no more than £800.00??
 

richardhurst

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 19, 2006
8
0
Right I Think I Have Narrowed It Down To Either The Sony Hdr-hc1 And The Hc3. I Only Need It For Normal Holiday Typr Stuff But Want A Good Picture, And I Do Like The Look Of The Hc1 Over The Hc3 But What Do You Guy's Think??
 

digitalprimate

macrumors newbie
Aug 8, 2006
10
0
richardhurst said:
Right I Think I Have Narrowed It Down To Either The Sony Hdr-hc1 And The Hc3. I Only Need It For Normal Holiday Typr Stuff But Want A Good Picture, And I Do Like The Look Of The Hc1 Over The Hc3 But What Do You Guy's Think??
Well, since we don't know you (or your habits, or your plans with the camera...)... This if from camcorderinfo, for both models:


HDR-HC3 Who It’s For
Point-and-Shooters (8.0)
For the point and shoot user, the Sony HDR-HC3 does provide a compelling, albeit expensive, way to access HD video quality without needing to engage manual controls or menu structure. This is due primarily to the Easy Mode switch and the strong reaction and performance of auto controls.

Budget Consumers (3.0)
This model is certainly less expensive than other HD format camcorders on the market, and is definitely an alternate option to the HDR-HC1, since the HC3 is definitely meant more for the auto-centric consumer. Sanyo released the least expensive HD camcorder on the market at $800 this year, but with better results for video and resolution when compared to the Sanyo Xacti VPC-HD1, the HC3 seems like a wiser investment.

Still Photo / Video Camera Hybrid (4.0)
For the user seeking hybrid functionality with their HD video camcorder, the Sony HDR-HC3 can record 4 MP still images to Memory Stick Duo Pro memory cards. This camcorder has a well placed in-camcorder flash, as well as the ability to accept external flash units which connect to the camcorder via the Active Interface proprietary hot shoe.

Gadget Freaks (8.0)
While the HC3 doesn’t have full manual control, and it isn’t covered in unique or innovative features, it does present users with a $1500 camcorder that produces HD video, which may grab the attention of the gadget freak on a budget.

Manual Control Freaks (6.0)
The HC3 lacks gain, aperture, and shutter speed control, all three essential settings for the manual control obsessed. Adding to these shortcomings is the unfortunate touch-screen interface system, which must be engaged to access the focus, exposure, and white balance manual options, and the ability to save only one manual control to the cam. ctrl. dial feature.

Pros/ Serious Hobbyists (7.0)
The serious hobbyist may be initially attracted to this camcorder due to both price and HD status, but with some interaction, the lack of manual control options, the touch screen interface, and other detractions will muddy the water.
And here's the second one...

HDR-HC1 Who It’s For
Point-and-Shooters (8.0)
Though the HDR-HC1 doesn’t features automatic controls as good as other Sony camcorders, it still performs well in auto mode, is easily handheld, and features an easily assignable focus / zoom ring for very easy and smooth zooms.

Budget Consumers (8.0)
While not exactly cheap, this is the cheapest HD camcorder available, and as such, is a great deal.

Still Photo / Video Camera Hybrid (7.0)
Still performance on the HDR-HC1 is excellent. It captures with roughly the same options as the DCR-PC1000, and produces wonderfully crisp still images.

Gadget Freak (7.5)
The gadget freak should be pleasantly accommodated by the HDR-HC1’s ability to capture HD footage solely, but the combo ring, and a wealth of other features, should thoroughly wet his or her whistle.

Manual Control Freaks (8.0)
The HDR-HC1 does feature more manual control than most Sonys, including manual shutter speed, sharpness, WB shift, AE shift, and color shift, but unfortunately it lacks independent iris adjustment and gain, both of which are included on the HDR-FX1. The combo zoom / focus ring on the HDR-HC1 is perhaps the most useful manual control device on the camcorder and definitely a necessary element for such an expensive piece of electronics.

Pros / Serious Hobbyists (8.0)
Definitely for the serious hobbyist.