Keeping iPad at an earlier release?

Discussion in 'iPad' started by Richard8655, Jun 16, 2018.

  1. Richard8655, Jun 16, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2018

    Richard8655 macrumors 6502a

    Richard8655

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago
    #1
    Wondering if others are intentionally holding their iPads at an earlier IOS release. If so, which?

    I’m keeping my iPad 5 on 11.3 for the time being. I just don’t trust Apple to do the right thing regarding performance as iPads age. I’m also not wanting to be on the bleeding edge of new release problems and issues.
     
  2. rui no onna macrumors 604

    rui no onna

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2013
    #2
    In our household:

    iPad 4: iOS 6.1.3 => nostalgia
    iPad Air: iOS 9.3.5 => use it for Netflix, Amazon Prime, HBONow, etc. screenshots
    iPad Air 2: iOS 10.3.3
    iPad Pro 9.7: iOS 10.3.3
    iPad Pro 12.9 (2nd gen): iOS 10.3.3
    iPad 5: iOS 11.3 => guinea pig
     
  3. FeliApple macrumors 65816

    FeliApple

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
  4. Richard8655 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Richard8655

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago
    #4
    Good to see not so unusual to do this.

    I’m with ya on iPad 5 and 11.3

    Wow, that’s conservative for an advanced iPad. But I don’t blame you for playing it safe.
     
  5. FeliApple macrumors 65816

    FeliApple

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    #5
    iPhone 6s, iOS 9.3.3. iPod Touch 5G, iOS 6.0. iPhone 5s, iOS 8.2 (Stock version, bought it late). I will never update anything. Whatever version it comes with, that's the version it will have forever. Not even point releases. Nothing.
     
  6. Richard8655 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Richard8655

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago
    #6
    Sounds like solid strategy. Although missing out on the latest “features”? (Me, I don’t need most of the latest.) Although missing security updates might be a risky point.
     
  7. FeliApple, Jun 16, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2018

    FeliApple macrumors 65816

    FeliApple

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    #7
    Features and app compatibility (From another thread):

    I do the 'refrain from updating' thing but to be honest it sucks. I had some Pages documents with a friend on my previous iPad and I couldn't open them because I couldn't have the latest Pages version because of my iOS version, I started to not being able to download apps and app updates due to the required version.
    But if that's the price to pay so that my iPad works flawlessly, then so be it. I'll seek app workarounds. I'll tolerate the nagging. I'll transfer documents in a different way. I can't have my iPad work awfully. When I get a new one, I'll maintain it in its original version and regain ability to download apps. And so on. Or maybe I'll keep this one and update the new one when I get it, I don't know.
    What I do know is, if I only have one iPad, I'll keep that one in its original version. I updated my iPad 4 and it was full of lag and general sluggishness. Now that I have my 9.7 Pro still on iOS 9 (and don't have the 4), it works flawlessly. It's too good of an experience compared to what I had to give it up for a few apps.
    I wish I could just update and have it work flawlessly to be honest, but if I can't, then I have to do what I have to do.
    Also, I forgot to say: The problem is unavoidable. Even if I update constantly, there will be a point (this is proven by experience and by reading everywhere) that even though it's supported, the device will start progressively lagging and working worse that how it worked before. Let's take the 9.7 Pro. Let's assume I update for app compatibility now to iOS 11. In two years, the general consensus is that iOS 13 lags this iPad too much, so I leave it in iOS 12. There will be a point where a majority of apps require iOS higher than 12. Result: iPad works worse than iOS 9, and I haven't solved the problem of app compatibility.
    Yes. I know. I gained time and support if I do that because no device is supported forever. But I still have the app problem and, not only that, but with an iPad that works worse than on iOS 9.
    Conclusion is: In the long term, you'll have the problem anyway, but you'll have an iPad that works worse than what it would have if you hadn't updated it to begin with.
    (One more thought that occurred to me now): Updating doesn't even guarantee you app compatibility. We wanted to play a game together. I on the 9.7 Pro on iOS 9, he on an iPad Mini 1 on iOS 9. The app crashed upon launch due to lack of device power to run it. Is it "compatible"? Yes. Does it work? No. End result is the same. Newer apps crash because the OS consumes too many resources. So even on the older apps performance is hindered.

    (I add this now on features): If I am willing to sacrifice a key piece of the iPad (Apps) in order to maintain performance, I'm even more willing to sacrifice features that weren't there initially. I'd like to have many features (iOS 10's Safari side-by-side; iOS 11 multitasking; iOS 12 battery details - to name a few that I want) but if that involves potentially risking my iPad to worse performance and battery life, I'll gladly forfeit features.

    Security (From another thread, too):
    At the expense of the most important thing - quality of use and reliability? How's worth it to have a massively secure device if it's going to take 10 seconds to open an app, will crash all the time, won't be able to enjoy it for, let's say, a relatively simple game because updates consume available resources, making the game/app crash at launch? (Has happened too many times). If battery life will make it so that at 1 PM I run out of battery because updates add visual animations and/or features that kill the battery in half the time? I'm "secure"? Yes. Am I guaranteed to be hacked? Hell no. Tell me, how many people were actually infected? I think there was one case where they tried a phishing hack on an activist but failed. There are no cases. It's perceived security. Even if they were, are they widespread? Like, for example, a WannaCry on iOS with millions of victims? No. Not ever. Not once. Is my experience good/acceptable? No. I'll take reliability and quality of use every single time.
     
  8. rui no onna macrumors 604

    rui no onna

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2013
    #8
    Wasn't intentional. It's just mostly been on LTE while charging so it hasn't downloaded the update, yet. I tend not to update until Apple bugs me and sometimes, not even then. :p
     
  9. ericwn macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2016
    #9
    I update when I feel like it and my devices are pretty up to date. Works fine for me.
     
  10. Richard8655 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Richard8655

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago
    #10
    Well described. Same situation with my iPad 3... it quickly became useless as I diligently kept it current. I think Apple either doesn’t do enough performance testing of their IOS releases on older iPads, or doesn’t care and assumes the owner can tolerate and accept sluggishness for the sake of the newest and latest features.

    I suppose those owners who treat their iPads as somewhat disposable and replace them every year or two, it doesn’t really matter.
     
  11. FeliApple macrumors 65816

    FeliApple

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    #11
    I think it's a little of both. Apple doesn't test enough, and maybe some parts of it are somewhat rushed, or Apple didn't (At least until iOS 12) care all that much if devices got slower. User tolerance is different. Mine is low. It has to work really well. Only initial versions satisfy that, so I don't update. App compatibility is what bothers me the most. I've wanted to download quite a few apps now that require iOS 10 or 11, but I have come to terms with it. I won't update, so I accept that I won't always be able to have all the apps I want.
     
  12. sracer macrumors G3

    sracer

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2010
    Location:
    Prescott Valley, AZ
    #12
    My iPad Mini 4, my iPhone SE, and my wife's iPhone SE will all be staying at 10.3 for as long as we own those devices. My 2018 iPad shipped with iOS 11 so that one will march on to 12, which actually should be better than 11.x. My wife's 12.9 Pro is also on 11.x and it too will move on to 12.
     
  13. Brandonjr36 macrumors 68000

    Brandonjr36

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    Sep 12, 2016
    Location:
    Joplin
    #13
    Was thinking about buying an iPad soon to try to get one on 11.3.1 like my iPhone X so I can jailbreak it. But I think I’m gonna wait and see if a new mini is released that is what I really want. Hopefully redesigned.
     
  14. Richard8655, Jun 21, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2018

    Richard8655 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Richard8655

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago
    #14
    Along these lines, will also eventually move to 12 on my iPad 5. But perhaps more cautiously being the prior model. I think my strategy is see how new releases are reported to perform on various platforms before moving.
     

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13 June 16, 2018