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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Kensington's ubiquitous hold on security locks for computers and other devices has loosened somewhat as devices have grown smaller and more portable, and the space requirements for the company's traditional lock mechanism have led Apple to even omit Kensington security slots from many of its recent products such as the MacBook Air and Retina MacBook Pro.

Kensington hopes, however, to reinvigorate the security lock with today's announcement of the new MiniSaver Mobile Lock designed specifically for use on ultra-thin notebooks and tablets and touted as "the industry's thinnest security lock system."

Screenshot-82-800x453.png
As opposed to the traditional "T-Bar" mechanism used for years by Kensington, the new MiniSaver lock features a patented "Cleat" locking design, including the smallest attachment points the company has ever made, to safely and securely provide ease of mind when leaving a computer or tablet alone in a public space or at the office.

The company says it's aware that though the technology has gotten smaller over the years, consumers' security needs haven't, and the MiniSaver is Kensington's answer to that problem. While the original Kensignton slot design is intended for devices at least 12 mm thick and requires internal vertical clearance of at least 7.5 mm for the T-Bar to rotate into locking position, the MiniSaver requires only about 3 mm of vertical clearance, allowing for installation on thinner devices.
"Today's increasingly mobile workforce is creating more demand than ever for ultra-thin devices and those devices need protection to prevent the mounting risk of theft and resulting data breaches," said Judy Barker, Global Product Manager, Kensington. "The first-line-of-defense provided by physical security locks can stave off device theft and save businesses and their employees from the costly exposure of a data breach. With our revolutionary MiniSaver design, now protection is not only easy but sleek and convenient as well."
Amongst other features, the lock also provides one-handed operation thanks to the simple push of a button on the security lock, includes a cut and theft-resistant carbon steel and protective plastic-lined cable, and allows greater freedom of movement and reduced blockage of nearby ports thanks to an off-body lock and pivot-and-rotate cable.

Kensington's MiniSaver Mobile Lock is available to purchase online now with prices starting at $59.99.

Article Link: Kensington Unveils 'MiniSaver Mobile Lock' for Use With Ultra-Thin Laptops and Tablets
 

iVoid

macrumors 65816
Jan 9, 2007
1,135
162
The only drawback is it still requires the manufacturer to put in the mini security slot, so we're SOL until Apple decides to put that onto their systems.
 

teslo

macrumors 6502a
Jun 9, 2014
929
599
if i was criminally inclined, i'd walk around for a day with hedge-clippers in a duffel bag if this became a big trend in a nearby park/public place.. which means it won't truly catch on. ask any bike thief how safe that thing looks.
 

unplugme71

macrumors 68030
May 20, 2011
2,827
754
Earth
if i was criminally inclined, i'd walk around for a day with hedge-clippers in a duffel bag if this became a big trend in a nearby park/public place.. which means it won't truly catch on. ask any bike thief how safe that thing looks.

Yup, you need to carry that super battery pack they sell that emits a very high voltage for 7-10 seconds. Similar to that of a Taser. Touch my bike again :cool:
 

theluggage

macrumors 603
Jul 29, 2011
5,507
4,621
if i was criminally inclined, i'd walk around for a day with hedge-clippers in a duffel bag if this became a big trend in a nearby park/public place.. which means it won't truly catch on. ask any bike thief how safe that thing looks.

Fine - so you've reduced the pool of potential thieves from "anybody" to "anybody who just happens to have a pair of heavy-duty snips with them" and doubled the time taken to steal it c.f. an unlocked laptop. The thief has to carry tools - which could get them arrested for "going equipped" in some circumstances - and also has a cut cable to explain away if they get caught. They still has to remove the lock from the slot, which could cause damage and reduce the value of the laptop.

The point of these devices is not to guarantee that your laptop is safe against someone determined to steal it, but to make it less convenient for the opportunistic thief, so that they hopefully go and find an easier target.
 

s0nicpr0s

macrumors regular
Sep 1, 2010
230
47
Illinois
Fine - so you've reduced the pool of potential thieves from "anybody" to "anybody who just happens to have a pair of heavy-duty snips with them" and doubled the time taken to steal it c.f. an unlocked laptop. The thief has to carry tools - which could get them arrested for "going equipped" in some circumstances - and also has a cut cable to explain away if they get caught. They still has to remove the lock from the slot, which could cause damage and reduce the value of the laptop.

The point of these devices is not to guarantee that your laptop is safe against someone determined to steal it, but to make it less convenient for the opportunistic thief, so that they hopefully go and find an easier target.

From my understanding, if they were to cut the cord between the lock box and the computer, they should be able to easily remove it. By the looks of it, pushing down the button, retracts an inner cable inside that smaller portion of cable. Then it would be as simple as pushing that inner cable out a little bit to retract the extended cleats.

I appreciate the idea of this product, and hope that it comes to market so that those who find it useful can purchase it. But it doesn't seem to be quite as strong as the original product. Mostly due to making the neighboring ports still accessible.
 

koruki

macrumors 65816
Aug 16, 2009
1,292
588
New Zealand
if i was criminally inclined, i'd walk around for a day with hedge-clippers in a duffel bag if this became a big trend in a nearby park/public place.. which means it won't truly catch on. ask any bike thief how safe that thing looks.

^clearly not cut out for crime
 

teslo

macrumors 6502a
Jun 9, 2014
929
599
Fine - so you've reduced the pool of potential thieves from "anybody" to "anybody who just happens to have a pair of heavy-duty snips with them" and doubled the time taken to steal it c.f. an unlocked laptop. The thief has to carry tools - which could get them arrested for "going equipped" in some circumstances - and also has a cut cable to explain away if they get caught. They still has to remove the lock from the slot, which could cause damage and reduce the value of the laptop.

The point of these devices is not to guarantee that your laptop is safe against someone determined to steal it, but to make it less convenient for the opportunistic thief, so that they hopefully go and find an easier target.

you didn't read my comment very well. i actually stated that with an observable trend of these kind of locks, criminals would have [x] number of new opportunities to snag a very portable, easily concealable $1500-$3500 laptop. much more valuable than the average bike, for sure. so do you assume bike thieves 'happen' to be wandering around with cutters out in the open? did you not notice i mentioned 'duffel bag'?

in fact, your reply makes almost no sense.

leave a computer out in the open attached to a flimsy wire (when the trend is to do so), don't expect to hold onto your laptop for very long. want to keep it? don't leave it out unattended. at all. very, very few public areas are safe.
 

Natzoo

macrumors 68000
Sep 16, 2014
1,793
493
Its good and all that....

Its good, but couldn't someone just cut it with a knife, just saying. I believe it is safe....but to an extent.
 

theluggage

macrumors 603
Jul 29, 2011
5,507
4,621
criminals would have [x] number of new opportunities to snag a very portable, easily concealable $1500-$3500 laptop

New opportunities compared to what?

Surely not the status quo, where people don't bother to lock their ultrabooks at all because current locks are too cumbersome and/or manufacturers are leaving out Kensington slots because they take up too much space?

so do you assume bike thieves 'happen' to be wandering around with cutters out in the open? did you not notice i mentioned 'duffel bag'?

So, why do you suppose people bother to lock their bikes? Hint: even a determined thief with a bolt cutter in their duffel bag is going to steal the unlocked bike first, and for every thief "going equipped" there will be many more potential thieves ready to opportunistically grab unsecured goodies.

Yeah, if you buy one of these locks with the notion that it renders your laptop unstealable, you're not gonna keep your laptop for long. However, even if it only means that stealing your laptop takes 15 seconds rather than 3 seconds, it will significantly reduce the risk of theft.

Virtually no consumer lock, chain, alarm etc. is anything more than a deterrent. Its all about making sure that you are not the lowest hanging fruit.
 

teslo

macrumors 6502a
Jun 9, 2014
929
599
New opportunities compared to what?

Surely not the status quo, where people don't bother to lock their ultrabooks at all because current locks are too cumbersome and/or manufacturers are leaving out Kensington slots because they take up too much space?



So, why do you suppose people bother to lock their bikes? Hint: even a determined thief with a bolt cutter in their duffel bag is going to steal the unlocked bike first, and for every thief "going equipped" there will be many more potential thieves ready to opportunistically grab unsecured goodies.

Yeah, if you buy one of these locks with the notion that it renders your laptop unstealable, you're not gonna keep your laptop for long. However, even if it only means that stealing your laptop takes 15 seconds rather than 3 seconds, it will significantly reduce the risk of theft.

Virtually no consumer lock, chain, alarm etc. is anything more than a deterrent. Its all about making sure that you are not the lowest hanging fruit.

bike locks don't use materials as thin as spaghetti. you're overthinking this.

if this lock thing becomes a trend (leaving your laptop unattended for more than 60 secs in public places) it won't be one for long. thieves will make sure of that.
/point
 

theluggage

macrumors 603
Jul 29, 2011
5,507
4,621
if this lock thing becomes a trend (leaving your laptop unattended for more than 60 secs in public places)

Laptop locks have been available for laptops for ages - its only the latest ultra-thin notebooks that can't take them. By your reasoning the typical park should already be full of unattended MacBooks chained to benches.

The typical cable lock is somewhat thicker than this new one, but is still vulnerable to a decent hand tool. The only effect of these has always been to reduce the pool of potential thieves to those prepared to risk wielding a tool (which completely wrecks any plausible deniability if they are disturbed - "Hi, er, I'm just collecting litter with, er, this pair of bolt cutters that I'm waving at your laptop...").
 
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