Keyboard registering incorrect keys...

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by ABernardoJr, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. ABernardoJr macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    #1
    First things first, I do acknowledge that my issue is more than likely caused by moisture within my MBP (mid-'10) keyboard (not really spilled but liquid leaked in during cleaning), and I've looked up plenty of scenarios of keyboards malfunctioning because of these kinds of things.

    However, upon turning it on a while after cleaning it (while unaware of the moisture really leaking) I noticed that my keyboard was acting funny. Whenever I pressed any key in the A or Q row, it would register that key and the key above it ('a' would be 'aq', 'j' would be 'ju', etc) along with a few other keys that were behaving differently (the ']' key brought the dashboard up lol). The Z row was fine. I've taken the steps of removing the affected keys and cleaning them out with Isopropyl Alcohol, and will let it dry in rice for a day or two.

    My question is, what exactly could be causing the keys to register incorrect/additional functions like this? Normally I've seen spills cause keys to not work, but haven't seen them affect the functions they were mapped to (maybe only one key doesn't work). I'd appreciate any possible insight on what could have gone wrong (with the liquid vs. keyboard/notebook).

    BTW it boots up fine, although it was a bit slow at first.
     
  2. mofunk macrumors 68000

    mofunk

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    Location:
    Americas
  3. Jexta macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    #3
    Why? Data corruption or bad blocks are highly unlikely to cause this issue.

    Back to the problem at hand, liquid spills rarely cause the same issue each time, and are capable of causing just about any problem you can think of.

    This is most definitely caused by a liquid spill, and I would suggest having your machine looked at by an Apple Service Tech sooner rather than later. If the corrosion is limited to the keyboard and topcase of your machine, then replacing these parts is significantly cheaper than if the corrosion has spread to your logic board.

    In the mean time, plug in an external keyboard, if this has the same issue, then the problem lies beyond the physical keys and instead indicates a problem with the signals being interpreted by your logic board.
     

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