Keynote - Presentation Control

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Jim Campbell, Apr 2, 2008.

  1. Jim Campbell macrumors 6502a

    Jim Campbell

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2006
    Location:
    A World of my Own; UK
    #1
    I have to admit, I haven't really tried to get to grips with Keynote beyond a few tentative test slides, but now I really want to start pushing to use the laptop and Keynote for work presentations ...

    Did I imagine it, or did Keynote recognise a click on the Apple Remote to be the same as a mouse click? Because since I upgraded to 10.5.2, it doesn't seem to respond to anything other than direct mouse clicks ...

    Cheers!

    Jim
     
  2. DaveF macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2007
    Location:
    NoVA
    #2
    Yes. Forward advances a slide. Backward goes backward a slide. Play will play any media in a slide. Menu brings up a slide-selector tool.
     
  3. southerndoc macrumors 6502a

    southerndoc

    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Location:
    USA
    #3
    If only the Apple remote was available in Bluetooth. The current remote requires a line of sight to the laptop, which makes it difficult to give presentations if you walk around the room much.
     
  4. JoshLV macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Location:
    Las Vegas
    #4
    Agreed! When i gave my recent presentation in Physics, I had to keep reaching around my hefty teacher to change slides.
     
  5. chatoyer macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Location:
    Te Wai Pounamu, New Zealand
    #5
    I generally use a Kensington wireless presenter rather than the Apple remote. I have this one, but I also have this one and like it better as it is slimmer. For both, the buttons are quieter and they each have a laser pointer. Note that these two options operate on different frequencies although I've not noticed a huge difference between the two in terms of reception. For both, I've found that you can have them in your pocket and change slides if you're reasonable close to the receiver (i.e., within 10 feet or so). Any further than 10-12 feet, though, and I've found that line of sight helps.
     

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