KisMac - MBP Unibody - late 2009

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by thetmyster, Nov 9, 2009.

  1. thetmyster macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    #1
    Hi Guys :D

    *just in advance, MoDs, if this is in the wrong section please move, im not sure :p*

    I have seen in other posts , here at macrumors there is talk of KisMac, that will allow AirPort Extreme card (active mode) drivers to load, the page that this points to is

    http://uneasysilence.com/archive/2007/06/11146/

    but, the download is broken, does anyone know of any mirrors?
    or can anyone e-mail me a copy... (Pm For Mail) :apple:
     
  2. Yixian macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2007
    Location:
    Europe
    #2
    I came in here hoping for late 2009 MBP unibodys xD
     
  3. DKatri macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    #3
    I had KisMac installed on my late 09 MBP but it wouldn't work properly at all. I'm not sure if its works with the current MBPs.
     
  4. thetmyster thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    #4
    Well, i got 1 pass for WEP Decrypted, but it has an impossible ASCII Key, and the raw key is like a mac adress, is there any way to decode this??:confused:
     
  5. grubworth macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    #5
    would be great if someone posted this to get it working :)
     
  6. thetmyster thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    #6
    Ya, KisMac is a very useful tool,

    it looks though for MBP Users you need a 10$ RT73 Chipset USB Dongle thing :p

    as i don't want to have to carry one around, please, is there a mirror to the link in the first post?
     
  7. cluthz macrumors 68040

    cluthz

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    Location:
    Norway
    #7
  8. Panzo macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    #8
    i have a rt73 dongle and kismac works on 10.6
     
  9. thetmyster thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    #9
    If you bought it online, can you post a link to where?

    i dont want to buy one and find it has the wrong chipset :p
     
  10. harperjones99 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    #10
    I know this is one of "those" questions but what are you guys using this for? To jump on other people's wifi free, to test security or both?

    If it is that easy how can I protect against someone using this against me?
     
  11. gorn macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    #11
    Don't use WEP. Use WPA/WPA2.

    WEP encryption is flawed and can be cracked in a number of minutes (depending on the circumstances). WPA/WPA2 are much better off however if you use a simple password you are still at risk. The password should not be a dictionary word. But an uncommon phrase with some numbers mixed will keep you safe. Also you should change the administrative password on the router web interface. If someone gets onto your network you'd rather they not be able to reconfigure your router for their torrents or whatever.


    Anyway back on topic, I just use linux via vmware and a USB dongle. The airport card in June 2009 UMBPs. Better tools that way. I use this one http://itrimming.com/gndslitead01.html but it was like $5 when I got it.
     
  12. harperjones99 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    #12
    I do use complicated passwords but KisMac claims to be able to beat them by brute force eventually regardless....is that not true?
     
  13. gorn macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    #13
    Brute force methods for WPA/WPA2 are really weak. Basically you capture a handshake (easy enough) then offline you can have your computer or multiple computers try every possible combination of passwords. Normally this would start with a password dictionary and if your key is included in the dictionary it will only be a short time before it's cracked. Especially if the attacker is using a "rainbow table" that includes your ESSID (basically precomputed passwords+essid combinations)

    But if it's not included and you have an 8 character password composed of random letters a-z (all lowercase) that gives us 26^8, or 20 billion possible combinations. Using a GPU-based WPA brute force attack, you can get roughly 400 keys per second. That means it would take a single computer a maximum of 16 years to crack the password, and an average of 8 years. Of course with 100 computers this is down to one or two months. But go up to a 9 letter password and the 100 computer attack now requires 4 years. Use uppercase letters and we're talking hundreds of years.
     
  14. thetmyster thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Nov 9, 2009
    #14
  15. thetmyster thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    #15
    It's For Testing my own network, i have a Router that uses WEP, because many Games Consoles do not support (easily anyway) WPA2 / WPA2personal

    it is to see how long and how much knowledge you need to piggyback me

    :D

    Here i have a green light (passive driver)

    [​IMG]

    on a WPA Network (my own)

    how would i decipher the key, If this is possible?
     

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