Know any Great Books for Learning Cocoa?

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by zophtx, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. zophtx macrumors member

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    #1
    sup im new here and im wondering if you know what book will be the best for learn Cocoa.... i got a few but i only have on that is working for me it is the

    Apress Learn Cocoa on the Mac book. i think that this book is nice. im one of those learners that like following somebody else project .. but i alter it for my on needs. do you guys think that you can give me some nice titles for Cocoa Books like this one and books that are up to DATE. like the Oreilly Learn Cocoa step-byStep book is like 10.1 OS. and it is hard to follow.

    i got a like 5+ Cocoa books and only 1 is on top.. i want more that can help!!

    thanks for the help.
     
  2. zophtx thread starter macrumors member

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    #3
    I have searched and searched for books. and now i would like others to give me suggestion for cocoa books. found Oreily Book. oh good reveiws i going to get it. wtf this is out of date >< to hard to follow. couple more books on cocoa. most of the books i found is out of date. that is why im asking you. so ill try this one more time think you can help? share what you read and if you think it works with me than give the title :)
     
  3. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #5
    Obviously you didn't even click on the link, which is a list of threads in which posters asked almost the exact same question you did.
     
  4. Gandolfmatt macrumors member

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    Jul 18, 2008
    #6
    The best thing besides reading books is jumping wildly into the field and getting right in the middle of the action. From there, you learn fast or die. A very useful tool(All I ever really needed) was Google.
    If you want a big head start, look at the bottom of my post. Though experimentation is definitely your friend.


    -Gan
     
  5. GorillaPaws macrumors 6502a

    GorillaPaws

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    #7
    Based on my experiences learning Cocoa through self-study, I would highly discourage this approach. There's a ton of great information in those threads linked via the google search, much of it from professional programmers who really know their stuff.
     
  6. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #8
    I use both approaches.
     
  7. jtara macrumors 65816

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    #9
    Another vote for this one. I feel this one works well for iPhone developers as well, though not as a primary source. Get a good iPhone development book and this one - it will flesh-out at lot of stuff that is glossed-over in most iPhone development books.

    As a second book, Cocoa Programming by Anguish, Buck and Yateman. Out of print but it can be found online, ebay, Amazon sellers, etc. (Unfortunately, often at jacked-up prices. I had mine shipped to the U.S. from a bookstore in England, because it was the only one I could find at a reasonable price.) Even though it is out of print, it is quite useful, as it goes into a great deal of depth on subjects that are barely covered if at all in other books.
     
  8. zophtx thread starter macrumors member

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    #10
    i already have and it isnt work out that well.

    oh i did cliclk on it but i didnt read what the thing are about. i give it a try thanks >.. :p

    same. well i most learn from others projects and than figure out what does what and than use it in my own project.
     
  9. Warhaven macrumors newbie

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    Mar 3, 2010
    #11
    Hehe. Hence, all my recent posts here. :)
     
  10. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #12
    Why not? Please elaborate.
     
  11. BigJimSlade macrumors member

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    #13
    The Hillegass book requires you to be marginally competent in a curly brace language (ideally C or C++). My guess is that the OP isn't.

    If this is the case then Kochan's "Programming in Objective-C might be a better choice as a first step before tackling Cocoa.

    It occurs to me that the choice has got a lot harder in the last year or so, with the high proliferation of iPhone programming books. We just used to say, "Buy the Hillegass, and shaddup!" Now there is actually more than *one* useful Cocoa book. Oh, the humanity! ;)
     
  12. idelovski macrumors regular

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    #14
  13. zophtx thread starter macrumors member

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    #15
    wow thanks for the link. i have like more than half of the books that are in this link is that all the books out there for Learning Mac Development....
     
  14. zophtx thread starter macrumors member

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    #16
    i wil agree with this.
    i got the Kochans OBJ-C book and the C book as well. i have been having a hard time learning things with kochans so i reread alot. like i read a page like 2 times before i go the the next but that doent happen if i get what he is talking about. but i think he describe everything logical. i like that because it makes me think. but when it comes to cocoa i need visual examples of what the project looks like. i like the cookbook stile for learning cocoa and the logical style for learning OBJ-C and C. cause C most goes with the terminal. and cocoa goes with the GUI.

    the GUI needs visual learning.
    the terminal needs logical learning.
    do you get what im getting at... i quess this is why the hillgass book is not working out that well. maybe i should allow a logical apporch to Cocoa and try use the same method that i used while readin kochans books.(reading a page 2 or more time at a time until i get the info tho my head into my mind and memory.)

    that what i think about learning programming
     
  15. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #17
    I had to read Kochan's book twice.
     
  16. idelovski macrumors regular

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    #18
    Well, today I bought on Amazon Learn Cocoa on the Mac.

    And later this year Hillegass/Big Nerd Ranch will have several Cocoa/iPhone titles ready, as it seems.

    What I would like to see this year are basically two titles:

    1. Foundation/Core Foundation book covering strings, arrays and other collections, networking/requests/connections and multithreading.

    2. Graphics book about Core Graphics/Core Animation/Core Image, Fonts and text rendering in Cocoa.

    Both of them should have 700 or more pages covering these things in depth and with useful examples.
     
  17. zophtx thread starter macrumors member

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    #19
    this book is very nice i just hope there more book like this one. the more resources you got for earning some thing the way you want to learn it is the most helpful way of lean the thing that you want to learn.

    this book is like a cookbook style and it is visual and a little logical but mostly visual
     
  18. nephilim7 macrumors regular

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    Jun 13, 2008
    #20
    if you want to be a serious programmer you're going to have to learn how to do your own research, work on that a bit...

    till then..

    Programming in Objective-C 2.0. Kochan Addison-Wedley

    Cocoa Design Patterns Addison-Wedley

    as well as the Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X and the other book already mentioned.

    what you want to *avoid* are books like Learn Xcode in 21 days or whatever. The only think you'll learn is how to give money to really bad publishers. There is no quick path to programming.

    To really grok Cocoa you need to know Objective-C, and object oriented programming. It really isn't a linear process. You have to learn a lot of things all at once.

    programming is not like painting a house, you can't pick up a 'good book' and run with it anymore than an aspiring 3D modeler can pick up 'maya for dummies' and become a master.
     
  19. zophtx thread starter macrumors member

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    #21
    ya i know that. but it doesn't hurt if you have "extra" resources to help you along the way. i been actually learning C, Obj-C and Cocoa at the same time now.

    Kochans C and OBj-C books i been reading

    Cocoa i been looking at and reading a couple books.
    1. Apress Learn Cocoa on the Mac

    2. Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X - 3rd Edition -

    3. Building Cocoa Applications - A Step By Step Guide

    4. and few more...

    i also have been experimenting with code as well.
    i know there isnt a "perfect" book for learning. but i was wanting to know if the was something close to it.
     

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