KVM library for OSX?

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by blueshogun96, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. blueshogun96 macrumors regular

    blueshogun96

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2012
    #1
    I read that up until OSX 10.5, it came with kvm.h. Nowadays, there doesn't seem to be any equivalents for this. I tried googling, but never did find any information as to why Apple decided to remove kvm.h from OSX.

    Any alternatives? Thanks.

    Shogun
     
  2. cqexbesd macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2009
    #2
    You might need to actually say what it is you want to achieve if you want alternative APIs proposed.
     
  3. cqexbesd macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2009
    #4
    I don't think the OP meant KVM, the virtualisation technology, but KVM, Kernel Virtual Memory. kvm.h, on BSDs usually contains definitions/APIs to access structs held by the kernel.
     
  4. blueshogun96 thread starter macrumors regular

    blueshogun96

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2012
    #5
    I was referring to the virtualization stuff. Sorry, I should have mentioned that.

    Basically looking into a simple virtualization project in an attempt to emulate a guest that has never been emulated before. I'm not new to emulation of x86 based machines (some will recognize my nickname and know what I'm talking about) and I would like to look into it.

    This is indeed what I am looking for, but unfortunately I do not own a 2010 Mac atm. So maybe when I finally get a new job I can afford a new comp.

    Thanks!

    Shogun.
     
  5. cqexbesd macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2009
    #6
    Well on the bright side the kvm.h that was removed probably wouldn't have helped you then :)
     
  6. jtara macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2009
    #7
    As pointed-out above, kvm.h has nothing to do with KVM, the virtualization technology. AFAIK, OSX never came with KVM.

    Also, AFAIK, KVM is not available for MacOS. It is Linux-specific, and MacOS is based on BSD.

    If you are just looking for a free virtual machine manager, consider VirtualBox:

    https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads

    If you don't mind spending a bit, also consider VMWare Fusion.

    I use both: VMWare Fusion for general use running guest OSs (Windows, Linux) and VirtualBox for running Android in GenyMotion. (I am an app developer.)

    Actually, VirtualBox comes packaged "under the hood" with quite a few products.
     
  7. Madd the Sane macrumors 6502a

    Madd the Sane

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2010
    Location:
    Utah
    #8
    I remember reading about a framework added to macOS named Virtulization.
     
  8. cqexbesd macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2009
    #9
  9. blueshogun96, Dec 29, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2016

    blueshogun96 thread starter macrumors regular

    blueshogun96

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2012
    #11
    Thanks, but that's not what I need for this intended purpose. This is for an emulation/VM experiment for an x86 based platform that has (to my knowledge) never been emulated, therefore not as simple as installing Windows or Linux. It's very hardware specific and only the x86 part gives it something in common with your everyday PC/Intel Mac.

    Either way, that framework, Xhyve, is precisely what I was looking for, even though I lack a Mac capable of running it. So for now I will stick to a simpler, yet more risky method.

    Shogun
     
  10. dyn, Jan 5, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017

    dyn macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Location:
    .nl
    #12
    Xhyve is not a framework, it is an application that uses the hypervisor framework in OS X. So does Veertu. Xhyve however is more like a combination of the hypervisor framework and bhyve from FreeBSD. Basically it is hypervisor.framework plus virtIO (which is what KVM uses as well).

    Hypervisor.framework is seriously lacking in features compared to Virtualbox which already is lacking in features compared to VMware Fusion and Parallels Desktop. If you want a free solution than Veertu/Xhyve (aka hypervisor.framework) or Virtualbox are the ones to look at. If you want very stable software from a company which has had years of experience with hypervisors then you should look at VMware Fusion. Parallels Desktop is a good alternative for Fusion but it doesn't support non-supported OS that well nor does it support as much operating systems as VMware products do.
     

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