Last year model that can be opened ?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Delmar, Mar 17, 2015.

  1. Delmar macrumors 6502

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    #1
    What is the last year model MacBook Pro that can be opened & change the RAM & hard drive?
     
  2. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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  3. Hieveryone macrumors 68020

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    #3
    That model is pretty good if someone needs the ports and cd drive.

    Think about it - change it out for a 1TB SSD and 16GB RAM and that thing is loaded. No retina but still good.
     
  4. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #4
    The lack of a retina display, heavy weight and a mediocre HD4000 iGPU doesn't make it all that worthwhile anymore. By the time you add in more RAM and SSD, it would've already cost almost as much as an rMBP.
     
  5. jclardy macrumors 68040

    jclardy

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    #5
    Uhh, maybe if you get it used for cheap. At $1099 that Apple is selling it for it is a complete rip-off. 7 hour battery, versus 12 on the Air, slower processor/GPU (3 years old now), low-res display, more weight (4.5 pounds), bigger footprint, and slower wireless.

    It should be priced at $799 at this point...but Apple doesn't want people to buy it, they just keep it around for people who still think they actually need a DVD drive with them 24/7.
     
  6. ps2sunvalley macrumors newbie

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    #6
    Umm, no. You can get 16 GB ram for under $200, and a 500 GB SSD for about $200, so we will take $400 as the estimate.

    You can't even touch a rMBP with 500 GB of storage until you get to $1799, and even with that you're only getting 8GB of ram, taking up to 16GB is gonna cost you another $200, so now we are at $1999.

    I picked up my non-retina MBP for $989 out the door, upgraded to 16 GB of ram for ~$180 and the next purchase is a 512 GB SSD for around $200, so I'm sitting at about $1389 for mine, yeah it doesn't have a retina display, but the display isn't 680x400 either.

    I'm really tired of the hate towards the cMBP around here.
     
  7. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #7
    How about let's use equivalent parts instead.

    Apple uses SM951-based SSDs in the rMBPs. The only comparable SATA3 part for the cMBP would be the Samsung 850 Pro. A 512GB 850 Pro would be around $300 itself already. But even the 850 Pro wouldn't come close, considering that it's not a PCIe part.

    RAM is RAM, so any brand could do. Make it around $180.

    So the upgrade for an almost-equivalent rMBP SSD for the cMBP plus 2x8GB sticks of RAM would push the cost to around $480.

    Say what you like, but the non-retina display is mediocre. Plus the HD 4000 iGPU. The additional cost for the retina display and far better iGPU makes up the remaining price delta. Oh, and also better battery life.
     
  8. Hieveryone macrumors 68020

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    Apr 11, 2014
    #8
    Yeah the main issue I see is the iGPU. You gotta at least get Intel Iris if you're on that 13" and Iris Pro if you're on that 15"

    Anything less isn't going to end well.
     
  9. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Auckland
    #9
    The spec chasers need to justify their own purchases LOL.

    Mine is better now than when I first got it 4yrs ago, I have a 1TB HDD and a 120GB SSD, an onboard spec you can't get at any price :) and I have onboard drive redundancy as well (only for media do I have to go to external backup, nothing work-related), none of the new machines can offer that.

    cMBPs rock!
     
  10. dyt1983 macrumors 65816

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    May 6, 2014
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    USA USA USA
    #10
    I agree with both of you.

    If the cMBP satisfies your needs and at a price you like, I think it's a fine machine and Apple still offers it for people that need either storage, optical drive, lower cost, of whatever feature attracts you. It still has it's place... unlike the iPod Classic (actually I think the iPod Classic has its place too, but Apple probably killed it because of parts availability problems).

    I really don't understand the people who actually SPEND THEIR TIME trying to tell others that they have no clue about their needs. This is a summation of how this thread looks:

    OP: What's the last model I can remove the bottom?

    Answerer: 2012. I like this because it is a less expensive route to the things I really need.

    Doubter: These other factors that probably aren't even important at all to you make the 2012 not worth it. And when you add a bunch of stuff in that you probably don't need, it's only a little cheaper.

    Answerer: Well here's what I found and it's significantly less money.

    Doubter: Oh, that stuff isn't good enough. Add this more expensive stuff. Then you'll see it's only a little cheaper. What you want isn't important, because the machine sucks. What I think is important is all that matters and should be requirements for everyone. Because I bought the better thing, and you didn't. So I am going to waste my time because I think I'm helping but I'm not really trying, and I'm not going to address the OP's original question, because that's not why I joined this thread. Good day.

    Really?

    I know, I know, "Welcome to the Internets". It still amazes me.
     
  11. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #11
    Nice summary :D
     
  12. Joelburman macrumors regular

    Joelburman

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    #12
    I really think its an underpreciated model. Sure its way overpriced new in the box. But I'd recommend it used for most people that want to jump ship from windows to OSX and if you really need the built in superdrive its by far the best lap-top out there.

    I would have loved a broadwell upgrade for this price but I realize its not according to Apple's business model.
     
  13. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #13
    Or the space and interface for a second SSD/HDD onboard...
     
  14. Joelburman macrumors regular

    Joelburman

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    #14
    True but in theory you could always upgrade to a bigger disk even tough its an expensive and rare thing to do because the disk limitations from apple. But the superdrive is something you always have to lug on if you have a retina version.
     
  15. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

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    Oct 17, 2014
    #15
    This. I'm surprised they still sell a MBP with a 3 year old integrated GPU, and the lack of a Retina display is a huge con compared to modern rMBPs. Not to mention it's thicker, heavier, and gets worse battery life.
     
  16. Joelburman macrumors regular

    Joelburman

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    #16
    Its a blessing in the sky if you want some freedom with your laptop. Then its the only choice. And in regardless to being thicker and heavier its still a very movable computer thanks to the form factor. As mentioned before I'd probably had gone for a cMBP Broadwell upgrade.
     
  17. happyfrappy macrumors 6502

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    Oct 14, 2007
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    Location eh?
    #17
    In the music industry several I know have stock piled 2012 Mac minis and bought a few "refurb" 13" cMBPs. Thunderbolt to FW800 adapter runs toasty when using a HDD or audio interface, if you use a rMBP/MBA with an audio interface may it be for live synths via MainStage or Ableton durability/reliability of that adapter will be a problem.

    Why not use USB 2.0 audio interfaces? Some you *need* to use a USB 2.0 hub on a 3.0 port or it just glitches/isn't detected. Experienced this USB 3.0 hell on Windows too.
     
  18. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

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    Oct 17, 2014
    #18
    I simply anticipate my future needs and spec my rMBP accordingly at time of purchase, enjoying a Retina display and all the other advantages in return. I don't see how this limits my "freedom" with my laptop.
     
  19. Joelburman macrumors regular

    Joelburman

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    #19
    The freedom aspect is mainly for us being OSD enough that we would go bonkers if a ram stick malfunctions and have to replace the entire computer.
     
  20. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Auckland
    #20
    Crucial word is "want". If you don't want that freedom then it has no purpose. Equally the fact that anyone doesn't want that freedom doesn't instantly write off those machines as garbage as some earlier posters quote...horses for courses.
     
  21. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #21
    Doesn't matter, whatever is currently the biggest single HDD (or SSD, or you can fit one of each like mine), you can likely fit 2 of them in a cMBP...
     
  22. Count Blah macrumors 68030

    Count Blah

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    Jan 6, 2004
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    #22
    I did the same thing, and bought a the 2012 cMBP, knowing I could upgrade it, when I needed to, for much less than apple would charge.

    You are happy with your choice, and I am happy with mine. Why does my happiness make you angry? I wish Apple was still making computers that were not all glued in. The new mini is an insult to consumers. At least the portables I can begrudgingly understand.
     
  23. mcarling macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2009
    #23
    I'm glad that works for you, but I would never go back to a non-Retina display. Never ever. That's not hatred. I just don't want one.

    If a non-Retina MBP were available with twice the speed, twice the capacity, half the weight, and half the price of the Retina MBP, I would buy the Retina MBP without any hesitation or regret.
     

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