Late 2011 MBP Heat Damage

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by lildrew, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. lildrew macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2011
    #1
    I am a professional photographer and use this computer daily. I have Crucial m4 SSD, 16 gb ram, optidrive with 750gb HD. The machine has been fantastic.

    I picked up the computer last night and it was scorching hot. My hand got burnt a little but nothing noticeable. I opened it and ran the fan at max speed to cool it down, went and photographed an assignment and came back and noticed there is heat damage to the screen and it got so hot that the aluminum on the unibody warped and caved in on the bottom right. I am bringing it into Apple tomorrow because obviously this shouldnt happen and will be replacing the computer back to stock today.

    Is this a normal thing?? Did the computer not go to sleep? I guess I am confused at what happened. If this has happened to others, will Apple replace the computer? If so would it be with a rMBP or is it possible to apply it to something like a Mac Pro?

    Thanks.
     

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  2. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

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    #2
    No it's not normal, and it's hard to say what caused it...All Macs have a shutdown temperature circuit which SHOULD have kicked in...Possibly a faulty Magsafe? Apple will be able to determine better when they have the machine back...Hope you get a replacement without any issues. But I can't see any...It's clearly faulty. I guess I've been lucky with my Macs...None of the 3 current machines has ever caused issues at all...I'm sure you were just unlucky.
     
  3. lildrew thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Nov 9, 2011
    #3
    Funny thing is, it wasn't connected to a power source.
     
  4. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

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    #4
    Bad battery / Logic Board I'd guess...Hope they fix you up.ASAP
     
  5. avalys macrumors 6502

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    Jun 4, 2004
    #5
    That is definitely a battery failure of some kind. Nothing else can generate that kind of heat. That would not happen from the computer simply not going to sleep, or any other minor malfunction. To my knowledge there are no components in that corner of the computer other than the battery. My guess is you will find quite a mess behind the back panel.

    Apple will not replace it with a rMBP - probably a refurbished model of the same generation, or a new cMBP.

    However, I would suggest re-installing the original optical drive before bringing it in for service. You never know what kind of **** they could give you about the Optidrive.
     
  6. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    Aug 5, 2010
    #6
    Given that they have a lot of refurbished stock, I'd guess that one, assuming they aren't just repairing whatever is necessary. If it is considered totaled, I'd ask if it's possible to pay the difference to a rMBP, although it's doubtful that would be granted. Getting something newer usually means the old one isn't fixable and they're no longer sold.
     
  7. w00t951 macrumors 68000

    w00t951

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    #7
    That's where the battery is located. The processors inside aren't capable of creating anywhere near the 1220F at which aluminum melts. On the other hand, I've seen faulty batteries burn holes through car hoods.

    And I doubt you would be able to get it replaced with a different model - maybe if you rushed them and said it was critical for workplace productivity they would give you a 2012 cMBP, but I doubt they'd give you a different product line entirely. I wouldn't ask specifically for a different model, or they might get suspicious that you've intentionally caused this damage.
     
  8. jkeekij macrumors regular

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    Oct 17, 2011
    #8
    The battery is located in the opposite end, and the hard drive is directly in that corner. The battery is a good 4 inches or more from that corner, and one would think that if it got that hot the hard drive would be damaged too. Is your drive OK?
     

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  9. lildrew thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Nov 9, 2011
    #9
    The computer is working and both harddrives functioning normally. I am transferring everything off it now.

    In terms of replacement, I could care less what Apple would give me. If they gave me a refurb 17 inch, then great cause I use the expresscard 34.
     
  10. A7ibaba macrumors regular

    A7ibaba

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    Sweden
    #10
    can u open down side panel and get a picture of internals so we can see what happened?
     
  11. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

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    #11
    I love my Macs... specifically my MBP's.

    So... I've learned via experience that the best gift I can give myself, is one that involves some patience and labor, but is worth every minute of the hassle.

    Upon receiving my new MBP each year, I unpack it and tear it down.

    I remove the gobs of excessive thermal paste, clean it up, and reapply a proper layer of paste.

    The reduction in temps is amazing, the fans don't have to work so hard, it runs quieter, cooler, and I have the peace of mind of having been inside and done the job myself.

    Now that I've done over twenty of them for myself and friends over the last few years, I've got the routine down quite well. It's not hard, just something that requires care, an uninterrupted block of time, and some high quality paste.

    Here's but one link of many from this forum that both verifies what I'm talking about, and if you do some more searching there are a more on here that have wonderful pictures and instructions that show you how to do it.

    This is a fine forum with endless help and support.

    Cheers :)


    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1124320
     
  12. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #12
    May I ask is it easy to do this without breaking any internal cables? That was always my biggest concern. I also wasn't sure where to buy a Y-type driver of suitable quality. Given that you mentioned consistently excellent results, what type of paste do you personally use? I'm asking about your habits personally as I've read the threads on this topic. They are covered with mixed results, but my 2011 17" gets ridiculously hot:mad:. Also what did you use to remove the old paste and clean in terms of cloth or other device and cleaning solution?
     
  13. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

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    #13
    Yes, if you have average mechanical dexterity, and take all the time you need, there is no reason to worry about breaking anything.

    The key is to take the time to visually inspect things, move the computer around once it's opened to view the components from a variety of angles. This will allow you to see how things are arranged.

    I use Q-Tips, denatured alcohol (any Home Depot or Lowes) to moisten a clean microfiber cloth, and carefully clean off all of the original thermal paste. The denatured alcohol doesn't leave any form of residue whatsoever and will not hurt any plastics wiring, or anything else.

    I buy microfiber cloths in any auto parts store. Sold as detail rags, they are the same high quality but at a much lower price than other sources. They are completely lint free which is why they are so valuable. I also use them moistened with distilled water to clean my displays and the rest of the outside.

    Here is where you can buy the proper screwdriver of high quality, for a reasonable price. This web site also has instructions on how to do the job.

    http://www.ifixit.com/Tools/MacBook-Pro-and-Air-5-Point-Pentalobe-Screwdriver/IF145-090

    Here is the brand of Paste that all the custom computer builders use. It's excellent and even keeps the over-clocked high end gaming systems cool.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835100007

    Hopefully I've answered your questions and got you off to a good start.

    Cheers :)
     
  14. alexander25 macrumors regular

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    Jul 17, 2012
    #14
    just be careful?

    i do the same thing, but not when i get the machine cause i'm too scared.
     
  15. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

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    #15
    I cannot stress enough... how important it is to simply block out lots of time and do not rush. Patience is your friend.

    This is indeed _easy_ when you are not stressed, rushed for time, ill prepared, or otherwise preoccupied.


    Even the first one that I did (and I'm very picky) was not very hard, just time consuming.

    Work on the largest clean surface you have so that you can spread things out and use a container to hold the various screws you remove.

    Go slowly, and look at the location and length of every screw or fastener you remove. Lay them out in order and you will be just fine.

    I have never broken anything. :)
     
  16. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    Aug 5, 2010
    #16
    I'd probably allow myself a couple hours for it. The guides seem to suggest something like a credit card or latex hand for spreading thermal paste. I've disassembled a lot of electronics, including smaller servers, yet somehow I've never repasted cpus.


    I'm better than average in that regard. I've just noted how fragile some of the cables look. I may practice on an older one which is out of service due to a swelling battery:p. It was my old travel notebook, as in old/cheap enough that if it was stolen or damaged while traveling, it wouldn't be a major issue. The newer one comes with me. I just wouldn't fly with it unless I needed to do work.



    I was wondering where to find those. I was just thinking isopropyl for cleaning. Both are non-conductive.

    I looked for reviews on their tools a while ago. They look okay. Supposedly the older sets weren't as good. I was looking at their interchangeable bit driver as I'm missing a couple of the smaller Torx drivers, and their kits include the non-standard bits.


    Yep. Thank you for writing that. It was awesome. That paste is rated quite well. The normal version of Arctic Silver 5 seems to be the most popular on here. I'd definitely like to take the temperatures down. I had one prior notebook that developed audible signs of fan wear, like the bearings were worn down (assuming they don't use sleeve fans).
     
  17. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

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    #17
    I'm a bit of a tool junkie since I do lots of computer work. The earlier drivers from iFixit were rather sub-standard, but the new ones are fine.

    Here's another source of pentalobe screwdrivers, you may like this one a bit better. It's a toss up.

    http://www.powerbookmedic.com/MacBook-Air-5-Point-Pentalobe-Screwdriver-p-20471.html
     
  18. lildrew thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Nov 9, 2011
    #18
    Here are the pictures...no visible issues...
     

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  19. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #19
    What tool brand do you personally use? I'm just wondering as you mention doing a lot of computer work.
     
  20. FuNGi macrumors 65816

    FuNGi

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    California
    #20
    Nice thread high-jack. By posting this I can only assume you are suggesting that this tedious reapplication of thermal paste would have prevented the OP's problem. HIGHLY DOUBTFUL. You gain what? 2-3 degrees from the one post in your link that actually has data. I think I'll leave it to the APPLE engineers thanks.

    OP: open the case up carefully. You could have a burst battery...but we would like to see pics...too slow now I see them!!! Is your battery on the opposite side of mine???
     
  21. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

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    #21
    I did NOT high-jack the thread.

    If I was "suggesting this tedious job" I would have said so.

    It's blatantly obvious you came to pick a fight... with nothing to contribute...nice try.
     
  22. filmbuff macrumors 6502a

    filmbuff

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    Jan 5, 2011
    #22
    That cannot be heat damage. It would take way over 500 degrees F to warp aluminum like that. The plastic battery would have burned through, the keys would have melted, the screen would have melted. You may well have an overheating problem but that damage must have been caused by a fall or something. Maybe a family member knocked it off the desk while you were gone? :)
     
  23. FuNGi macrumors 65816

    FuNGi

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  24. daneoni macrumors G4

    daneoni

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    Mar 24, 2006
    #24
    That looks like physical damage to me. As already mentioned you need 660C to melt aluminium.
     
  25. AzN1337c0d3r macrumors 6502

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    Sep 13, 2010
    #25
    Agreed. There is no way that is Aluminum heat damage. If the aluminum actually got hot enough to melt, you'd be also looking at melted plastic bits, possibly cracked screen, and definitely combustion from your Lithium-Ion battery.
     

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