Leopard + Windows 7 bootcamp...possible?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by 22Hertz, May 7, 2010.

  1. 22Hertz macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2007
    #1
    Im about to do some things that require W7 on my MBP

    After thinking it over I have three options:
    -Put W7 on Leopard
    -Upgrade to Snow Leo + W7
    -Not put Windows on at all and buy a separate cheap laptop

    My question is
    -Can I put W7 on a Leopard OS running machine?
    -If I upgrade to Snow Leopard are there any known issues that would make it more trouble than it's worth? Leopard is working %100 for me
    -Will Windows act quirky on my Mac/cause any unrecoverable problems? Especially will it run the hardware hot? I'm one of the unlucky ones that got the bad Nvidia chip...heat is the enemy.
     
  2. StruckANerve macrumors 6502

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    Rio Rancho, NM
    #2
    I say upgrade to Snow Leopard. It's only $29 bucks. That's what I did recently and the Win7 install went smooth for the most part. I still had some trouble installing the drivers but a quick google search fixed my problem.
     
  3. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #3
    Even if you don't want to install Snow Leopard, buying the $29 upgrade is the only legal way to get the Boot Camp 3.x drivers which themselves are worth the $.

    You can still use the Leopard Boot Camp Assistant and the firmware extensions are the same between 10.5 and 10.6.

    B
     
  4. 22Hertz thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 20, 2007
    #4
    So I buy Snow Leopard, install the bootcamp drivers and install W7 normally through bootcamp on Leopard?
     
  5. hpicracing macrumors newbie

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    Apr 10, 2010
    #5
    i just did this about a month ago... works flawlessly. just upgrade to snowy then install win7 through boot camp.
    EDIT: BTW, if you didn't buy windows 7 yet, you might want to consider buying an OEM version. I got mine online for $86 and it's Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit. It's cheaper then buying the retail verison, but there are some things different between retail and OEM. OEM won't come in a "pretty box" or include any manuals like the retail verisons too. With OEM the software is also tied to the motherboard it's installed on. With the retail version you can transfer your license to a new motherboard once. OEM is also specific to 32 bit or 64 bit when you buy it, it won't include both the 32 and 64 bit version like the retail. Last difference is OEM won't give you the 90 days of free tech support. If you can deal with these differences, OEM is a cheaper way to get Windows 7 (retail is $199... oem is anywhere from $86 to $99)...
     
  6. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #6
    If you really don't want to upgrade to SL.

    You will have to deviate from the script just a bit though. Create the partition with Boot Camp Assistant, but BCA will not recognize W7 as a supported version of Windows so you will have to boot manually. Just hold down Alt/Option during boot/reboot to tell it to boot from the W7 CD or HDD during the install process.

    Use OEM if you want to, but understand that you do so outside the license under which it is sold. It is licensed only for System Builders intending to resell the systems to a third party not for end users. It works yes, but just like a hackintosh works.

    B
     
  7. VPrime macrumors 68000

    VPrime

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    Dec 19, 2008
    Location:
    London Ontario
    #7
    ? What does this even mean? Are you trying to say an OEM copy is similar to a hackintosh? Because that is not true at all.

    The OEM copy is the EXACT same copy as a retail, except it has one file modified (which you can change) to only accept OEM license keys. The hardware is fully supported and works PERFECTLY. PLUS, if you want to be 100% legal you can buy a piece of hardware (any thing really.. keyboard, mouse.. ram) and you fall under the EULA.

    Where a hackintosh is an operating system running on UNSUPPORTED hardware. You run risks of having the OS not work at all, an update killing your install, and possible hardware not working properly or not detected at all.

    Unless you mean the licensing agreement.... Which I must say is still very different.
     
  8. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #8
    I mean you are using software without a valid license. If you prefer it is like using the $29 SL upgrade on a Tiger box. It'll work but you are outside the letter and spirit of the license.

    I suggest you read the current System Builder License, the Microsoft page 'licensing for hobbyists" and the fine article by Ed Bott I have linked to many in the past it is very clear that you MUST resell the system after you install the OS. The EULA does not apply, because you did not accept and follow the SBL.

    There are plenty of other differences between retail and OEM so it is naive to say it is "identical to full retail.

    Doesn't mean you should not consider OEM, just understand what you are doing.

    B
     
  9. 22Hertz thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 20, 2007
    #9
    I get the student discounted W7pro so no big deal on price.
    Your explanation of the differences was interesting though, thanks for that.

    I hold down ALT during boot and OPTION during reboot? Or is it OPTION+ALT
    Anything else I should be aware of?
     
  10. VPrime macrumors 68000

    VPrime

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Location:
    London Ontario
    #10
    Oh ok, that makes sense. I agree.

    But, there are no differences with the OS between retail and OEM. Only differences are the licensing. With OEM you can install on one computer hard ware only. So if you upgrade a motherboard, you pretty much need a new license (legally.. not technically). YOu also don't get a fancy box, or tech support.

    There are also "royalty OEM" copies, these are ment for the big companies like DELL. These have the typical "Other junk" that these companies put on. So trial software and what ever else.

    But the OS is still the same.:rolleyes: installing OEM instead of retail does not mean you will be losing features, a slower experience, or even a different experience at all. Once the disc is in the drive every thing is the same.
     
  11. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #11
    Alt/Option is one key usually found on the bottom row next to Command.

    B
     
  12. KeriJane macrumors 6502a

    KeriJane

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    #12
    Another thing to consider when buying an OEM version of Windows for use on a Mac:

    As stated, an OEM version of Windows gets tied to a specific machine and is never intended to be transferred to another. Otherwise it's functionally identical. An OEM "CD Key" cannot be changed to a full version, only the installation disc can.

    This should work out well enough if you use BootCamp exclusively.

    A problem arises if you then start using Parallels, Fusion or another virtualization program to run Windows from within Leopard or Snowie.

    The virtualization program will likely break the activation, requiring a phone call to Microsoft's Activation center in order to re-activate.

    If you tell them the truth (that you're using OEM software on a Mac or under Virtualization software) they will probably invalidate the license right then!
    Leaving you in the situation of having to buy another copy of Windows.

    The better option is to pay up for the "Full Retail Box" version of Windows which allows for this manner of use.
    The best option is to avoid Windows and other Microsoft products altogether.

    Good Luck,
    Keri
     
  13. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #13
    They are not functionally identical. For example, you can do an upgrade install with a full retail disc, you can't with OEM.

    NOTE: I have, myself, run Vista OEM activated in both Boot Camp and VMWare Fusion without issues, and folks have reported moving OEM licenses from one machine to another, so it's not that it won't work, just that you take a risk running anything other than "full retail".

    B
     
  14. KeriJane macrumors 6502a

    KeriJane

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    #14
    Hi Balamw

    The installation routine is different. The upgrade options are different.
    But once you have the Windows installed they operate the same with no differences to the user.
    Until you run afoul of Windows Activation, that is.
    That's the point I was trying to make.

    Microsoft does allow "Major Upgrades" to an OEM licensed computer.
    It's based upon time elapsed since most recent Activation.
    IIRC, it was 90 or 180 days for XP Pro.
    What it might be for Seven I don't know.
    The end result was: If you waited half a year or so, you could change out the whole computer and re-activation would go without a hitch.

    What MS considers "Minor Upgrades" usually isn't a problem. The ID of a specific machine was comprised of a "Hardware Hash", itself made up of a combination of all the components electronic S/Ns.
    Some components were considered more or less important depending upon likelihood of being upgraded. Memory= less important / Network adaptor= more important.
    Change too much too soon and POW.... you're out of business.

    The whole sorry mess (Windows) is best avoided.

    Have Fun,
    Keri
     
  15. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    New England
    #15
    I know. ;) I know you know the deal, but there are many folks who come here looking for "which Windows should I use?" and get an answer like "OEM is identical to full retail, but cheaper".

    It isn't. You know that, I know that.

    I'm just trying to make sure other less informed/experienced people reading this thread have enough information to decide for themselves if the real constraints/limitations of OEM are really worth the "savings".

    B
     
  16. 22Hertz thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 20, 2007
    #16
    I should have named this thread "Please deter me from wanting Windows"
    Its working...the more I read the more I realize the headache Microsoft is.
     

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