Lighting? Home Depot Work Lights?

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by jayeskreezy, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. jayeskreezy macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2005
    #1
    Are 1000 watt lights too much? I picked up a 500 watt portable work light from home depot today, but I was wondering if I should switch to 1000? Also, I hear people talking about filters...which ones should I get and why?
     
  2. -DH macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    Nashville Tennessee
    #2
    >>Are 1000 watt lights too much?<<

    Yes. No. Maybe. It all depends on what you're trying to light. Too much light is just as bad or worse than not enough light. The KEY to lighting for good video is to use PROPER lighting for the situation.

    Work or utility lights can be used in some situations, but given the fact that there often isn't any way to control the light source, they are mostly relegated to background or flood lighting. But if that's all you have to work with, you can use aluminum foil for improvised flagging ... and a pair of gloves for handling hot surfaces.

    By "filters," due you mean gels used with lighting? If so, check out Rosco and CMC. Gels are available for color correction, general coloring (stage or accent) and diffusion.

    -DH
     
  3. jayeskreezy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2005
    #3
    can you explain flagging?
     
  4. -DH macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    Nashville Tennessee
    #4
    Flagging is a method of controlling light by blocking (flagging) it. Most lights designed for film and video work will have "barn doors" installed that can be adjusted to control light from spilling on surfaces that shouldn't be lit. But you can also flag light with other methods.

    Here's a sampling of flags from B&H: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/3result...ch&A=search&Q=&shs=flag&ci=1334&sb=ps&sq=desc

    Other methods of controlling light include reflectors, diffusers, scrims, gobos and dimmers.

    -DH
     
  5. -DH macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    Nashville Tennessee
  6. kyleronan macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    #6
    your links are very helpful DH. Thanks!

    ______________________
    pendant lighting
     
  7. wonderspark macrumors 68030

    wonderspark

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Location:
    Oregon
    #7
    Make sure you employ some form of white balance with your light, if you care. I hate looking at horrible color-incorrect video, personally. It could be as easy as setting it off a piece of white paper.
     
  8. handsome pete macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    #8
    When using lights like these, it's a good idea to really use bounce lighting.

    Get yourself some foamcore and clamps and bounce away.
     
  9. jumpcutter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2011
    #9
    For bouncing, it can be simple - aim lights at white wall or ceiling to add overall diffuse light to the room.
    Ideally, you want more than one light on the subject, otherwise you end up with some harsh shadows, or they look like a deer in headlights.
    Play with the lights, get an idea of what works/doesn't. Also, think about what light is already there. If you have a window with sunlight coming in, don't put that behind your subject, use the light coming in. You need to be careful though, because sunlight and a standard tungsten or fluorescent light all have different colors, which affect your images.
    Good luck.
     

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