LINC computer designer dead

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by monokakata, Feb 27, 2016.

  1. monokakata macrumors 68000

    monokakata

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    Hilo, Hawai'i
    #1
  2. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    República Cascadia
  3. AlliePallie macrumors newbie

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    Feb 27, 2015
    #3
    I used the DEC version, the LINC-8, for a long time. Nice machine. Both the PDP-8 and the LINC used an order code roughly similar to that on the IBM 704 machines but a bit different. One used 1's complement arithmetic, the other 2's complement arithmetic. The DEC version used both processors, intertwined, which made assembler programming rather interesting. So was printing everything out on the ASR-33 teletype. Still, the Dectape drives were very reliable and the CRT display was well ahead of most at the time (1960s).
    It is also amazing that one could do a hell of a lot of interesting stuff with, on my machine, 8K of 1.4 MHz RAM and very, very careful assembler programming.
     
  4. I7guy macrumors G5

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    What Exit?/Saguaro Country
    #4
    Ah, memories of an era long gone.
     
  5. Sciuriware macrumors regular

    Sciuriware

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    Gelderland
    #5
    I started on an LAB-8/E (PDP-8 for laboratory).
    I read a lot about the LINK but never saw one.
    Btw.: there's also an ancient language LINC, by BURROUGHS.
    ;JOOP!
     
  6. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    Redondo Beach, California
    #6
    No, not gone. I'm using 8-bit processors and 4k to 8k of memory today. You can still do a lot of stuff, like for example control motion control of a robot motor. What's changed is the price and size of the 8-bit CPU. I'm using tiny chips the cost about $2 each. and are much smaller and cheaper than the electric motor they control.

    One of the last times I did this was to use two temperature sensors and a tiny 8-bit computer to control the speed of an exhaust fan so as to keep the temperature inside an enclosure constant. The electronics inside (an atomic clock) needed to be kept at some stable temperature. The total controller was about 1/2 inch square and costs practically nothing but it is very much the same as we did decades ago.
     
  7. I7guy macrumors G5

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    What Exit?/Saguaro Country
    #7
    Very cool stuff. Those components in 1974 cost thousands of dollars...lol.
     
  8. BittenApple macrumors 6502a

    BittenApple

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    Nov 29, 2008

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