Linksys Introduces 'Linksys Aware' Service for Sensing Motion Using Mesh Wi-Fi

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
7,399
8,478



Linksys today announced the launch of a new subscription service that lets you use some of the company's existing Velop mesh Wi-Fi router systems as motion-sensing security devices.


Dubbed Linksys Aware, the technology is initially compatible only with the company's Velop Tri-Band AC2200 routers, but will be rolling out to some of the brand's other mesh Wi-Fi products in a phased rollout.

Linksys Aware is able to sense motion in your house without the need to add cameras or other accessory devices, with the various mesh nodes detecting how movement in the vicinity affects Wi-Fi signals as the nodes communicate with each other.


Users can customize the sensitivity level of the system to filter out pets of various sizes, for example, and once the motion threshold is exceeded you'll receive a notification on your phone.

As the system doesn't involve a camera, there's no way to remotely check in on the detected motion to see what it is, but at least you'll be alerted if unexpected motion is detected in your home. Motion events are stored for 60 days, so you can check back to see a recent history by hour, day or week.


Linksys Aware is free for the first 90 days, after which a subscription priced at $2.99 monthly or $24.99 annually will be required. A firmware update and App Store app update will be rolling out today to add support for the feature.

With the discontinuation of its AirPort lineup of wireless routers, Apple has embraced Linksys as one of its primary third-party partners, selling several configurations of the Velop system online and in its retail stores.

Article Link: Linksys Introduces 'Linksys Aware' Service for Sensing Motion Using Mesh Wi-Fi
 

Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
30,307
30,543
I would probably test this for the first 90 free days to see how accurate it is. If I am alerted of a ‘motion’ in my house, I’d rather login to a Camera to see exactly what caused the motion, the fact that this doesn’t offer any type of visual indicating the motion where it can’t be tethered to my cameras, then I think that’s a dealbreaker for me personally. But 90 days is a decent length of a trial, but I don’t believe this will be popular due to the monthly fee/‘subscription’ type service.
 

nutmac

macrumors 601
Mar 30, 2004
4,169
2,032
The problem with these "security systems", beyond $25/year subscription fee, is lack of visual confirmation. If you are at work and you get an alert, are you going to drive home only to see that it was a false alarm?

Your money is far better spent on security camera, ideally one that would be supported by HomeKit Secure Video coming later this year.
 

Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
30,307
30,543
The problem with these "security systems", beyond $25/year subscription fee, is lack of visual confirmation. If you are at work and you get an alert, are you going to drive home only to see that it was a false alarm?
The only other viable alternative is if you have a separate camera system enabled to the Wi-Fi system alongside this type of motion alert. Now, the customization that you can set the motion setting is a really good idea, that way it prevents issues from false alarms if you have a pet or things of that nature. So in my situation, my cameras don’t have a motion detection alert, but I can login remotely anytime I want to, but I _could_ see this being a side advantage to let me know that there is a motion, but nobody wants a subscription service, not when there’s a monthly fee basically for everything today, including the WiFi you’re already paying for.
 
Last edited:

justperry

macrumors G4
Aug 10, 2007
10,119
5,184
Home is everywhere and nowhere.
Oh, screw you and the "recurring-revenue subscription-model" horse you rode in on, Slinksys.
Most people aren't even aware of the annual fee larger companies have to pay for using their expensive Wireless access points which they paid top $ for.
My company does this as well, stupid, invest in a new system like Ubiquiti and gone are those recurring annual licence fees, mostly annual software fees.

As for the above, Linksys sucks big time, this is just hilarious, should be included in the controller/software.
 

Analog Kid

macrumors 601
Mar 4, 2003
4,767
2,789
Cool tech, broken business model...

I like the idea of sensing motion without having to put cameras in my home. I’m sure this will start to get more sophisticated with time. I might have chosen Linksys over other vendors for this feature, but I won’t make recurring payments for a feature without a recurring cost...
 
  • Like
Reactions: mcdawg

Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
30,307
30,543
I like the idea of sensing motion without having to put cameras in my home.
I find this to be a strange response. Why wouldn’t you want cameras in your home? So you’re saying if a motion gets ‘detected’, yet you can’t visually see what the motion was, then how does that provide you any type of comfort/reassurance of what caused the motion in the first place? Also, most of these motion systems available already include Camera detection, unless you À la cart your own security. [Which also isn’t common.]
 
  • Like
Reactions: dysamoria

Analog Kid

macrumors 601
Mar 4, 2003
4,767
2,789
I find this to be a strange response. Why wouldn’t you want cameras in your home? So you’re saying if a motion gets ‘detected’, yet you can’t visually see what the motion was, then how does that provide you any type of comfort/reassurance of what caused the motion in the first place? Also, most of these motion systems available already include Camera detection, unless you À la cart your own security. [Which also isn’t common.]
For the same reasons people install glass break detectors, door and window sensors, and IR and ultrasound motion detectors-- so you can tell if someone is intruding without turning your life into the Truman Show.

The point of detecting motion isn't to be comforted, but to respond. I have no pets, so there aren't a lot of things that should set off a well tuned motion sensor-- if there is a person size motion in the home, it's probably a person.

Cameras everywhere are creepy. Why bring the surveillance state into my own home? Connecting a camera from your home to the internet is just dumb-- if you don't have complete control of that image from end to end, there's no reason to have an expectation of privacy in your own home.

And even if you do have end to end control, do people really want to visit your home knowing they're being watched everywhere they go? And if they're not being watched everywhere, what's the point? I'm making some assumptions about what this system is, or will eventually be, capable of but my expectation is that there's motion sensing in most areas where there is strong WiFi coverage (I'd guess weak coverage doesn't have enough diversity to measure much with any reliability). If you have a window in your bedroom, bathroom, or basement with no camera there, having one looking at your front door doesn't do much good-- but if you have WiFi coverage there then presumably you'd know if someone's prowling around.
 
Last edited:

MacFan23

macrumors 6502
Feb 17, 2010
360
313
For the same reasons people install glass break detectors, door and window sensors, and IR and ultrasound motion detectors-- so you can tell if someone is intruding without turning your life into the Truman Show.

The point of detecting motion isn't to be comforted, but to respond. I have no pets, so there aren't a lot of things that should set off a well tuned motion sensor-- if there is a person size motion in the home, it's probably a person.

Cameras everywhere are creepy. Why bring the surveillance state into my own home? Connecting a camera from your home to the internet is just dumb-- if you don't have complete control of that image from end to end, there's no reason to have an expectation of privacy in your own home.

And even if you do have end to end control, do people really want to visit your home knowing they're being watched everywhere they go? And if they're not being watched everywhere, what's the point? I'm making some assumptions about what this system is, or will eventually be, capable of but my expectation is that there's motion sensing in most areas where there is strong WiFi coverage (I'd guess weak coverage doesn't have enough diversity to measure much with any reliability). If you have a window in your bedroom, bathroom, or basement with no camera there, having one looking at your front door doesn't do much good-- but if you have WiFi coverage there then presumably you'd know if someone's prowling around.
What if I told you it’s possible to put motion sensing cameras outside of your home?
 

macduke

macrumors G4
Jun 27, 2007
10,566
14,057
Central U.S.
How long before a router company such as Eero, which is now owned by Amazon, starts doing this without telling you to track how many people, animals and children are in your house for targeted advertising?

This is precisely why Apple still needs to make routers. Creepy.
 

bikeoid

macrumors newbie
Jul 3, 2010
16
3
This will create a problem for movie producers - how to create the scene where the thief wears cool googles or sends in a fog to view the laser beams guarding the valuable exhibit?
 

Analog Kid

macrumors 601
Mar 4, 2003
4,767
2,789
What if I told you it’s possible to put motion sensing cameras outside of your home?
If, hypothetically, you told me such a thing then I would likely find myself fighting the urge to cuttingly feign shock that such technology exists while truthfully wondering how it is relevant to the discussion...
 

dysamoria

macrumors 6502a
Dec 8, 2011
837
431
When are they going to force us to rent all hardware we used to buy? I can’t wait for this new level of our dystopia.
 

DoctorTech

macrumors 6502
Jan 6, 2014
493
910
Indianapolis, IN
For the same reasons people install glass break detectors, door and window sensors, and IR and ultrasound motion detectors-- so you can tell if someone is intruding without turning your life into the Truman Show.

The point of detecting motion isn't to be comforted, but to respond. I have no pets, so there aren't a lot of things that should set off a well tuned motion sensor-- if there is a person size motion in the home, it's probably a person.

Cameras everywhere are creepy. Why bring the surveillance state into my own home? Connecting a camera from your home to the internet is just dumb-- if you don't have complete control of that image from end to end, there's no reason to have an expectation of privacy in your own home.

And even if you do have end to end control, do people really want to visit your home knowing they're being watched everywhere they go? And if they're not being watched everywhere, what's the point? I'm making some assumptions about what this system is, or will eventually be, capable of but my expectation is that there's motion sensing in most areas where there is strong WiFi coverage (I'd guess weak coverage doesn't have enough diversity to measure much with any reliability). If you have a window in your bedroom, bathroom, or basement with no camera there, having one looking at your front door doesn't do much good-- but if you have WiFi coverage there then presumably you'd know if someone's prowling around.
Good points. I have 4 cameras (all with built in motion detection) at my house. 3 of them are mounted outside to monitor doors and the 4th one is in my garage but it is also just pointed at the service door in the garage. I have clear security film installed on all of my windows which holds the glass in place even if someone breaks the window so getting into my house via a window would be a very time consuming and noisy process. I intentionally avoided putting cameras in the living space for the reasons you mentioned.
 

DoctorTech

macrumors 6502
Jan 6, 2014
493
910
Indianapolis, IN
How long before a router company such as Eero, which is now owned by Amazon, starts doing this without telling you to track how many people, animals and children are in your house for targeted advertising?

This is precisely why Apple still needs to make routers. Creepy.
I agree 100%. The same thought was going through my mind as I was reading the article. I was watching a review of the Eero mesh router on the "Undecided with Matt Ferrell" YouTube channel. As he was describing the pros and cons of the router I was really interested in getting one until at the end of the video he mentioned Eero had just been purchased by Amazon. I used to have several Amazon echo devices in my home but I have replaced them with HomePods. I really liked Alexa's ability to find answers to obscure questions but I trust Apple / Siri much more on privacy and that is much more important to me.