Linux

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by jwolf6589, Dec 11, 2018.

  1. jwolf6589 macrumors 65816

    jwolf6589

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    #1
    What is Liniux used for these days? Why would anyone want to use this OS when Windows 10 and Mac OS dominate?
     
  2. SandboxGeneral Moderator emeritus

    SandboxGeneral

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    #2
    Is this a serious question?

    Linux is an open source operating system with numerous distro's available. Most of the world's supercomputers run on Linux as do many enterprise class companies use Linux for their servers.

    I use Linux at work for my desktop PC and I like it far better than Windows.
     
  3. jwolf6589 thread starter macrumors 65816

    jwolf6589

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    #3
    Yes. Most companies use Windows I bet for their servers.
     
  4. chrfr macrumors 604

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    #4
    That's definitely not the case for web servers.
     
  5. SandboxGeneral Moderator emeritus

    SandboxGeneral

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    #5
    Right. CentOS is a pretty popular one for web servers as well as Debian.
     
  6. jwolf6589 thread starter macrumors 65816

    jwolf6589

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    #6
    I did not know this.
     
  7. Shadow Jolteon, Dec 11, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2018

    Shadow Jolteon macrumors regular

    Shadow Jolteon

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    #7
    Linux certainly doesn't have anywhere near the user base as Windows or macOS as far as your everyday users go, but it is pretty big in enterprise, and especially with web servers, supercomputers, and research, as @chrfr and @SandboxGeneral mention. It's often used for the security it provides as well as its capacity for customizability and extensibility. Those who use it on their personal computer are generally developers of some kind, or just the type who prefer a particular distribution or like tinkering with and customizing things. Linux can also be useful in reviving or keeping older machines running where there's not support from Microsoft or Apple, or just avoiding their license fees.

    Other systems that gets a fair amount of use, but not much recognition, would be UNIX-like BSD systems such as FreeBSD and OpenBSD. FreeBSD in particular is used in a lot of situations, and is even the OS running on both the Nintendo Switch and Playstation 4. It is also what Darwin (the base system of macOS, iOS, etc.) is based on.

    There's also a TON of miscellaneous devices around that use Linux or FreeBSD to function, though we may not realize it due to their application. Basically, just because we don't see these operating systems around your home or office everyday, they are pretty big and much of the tech industry still relies on them, and they're frequently used in environments where there are very specific needs to be met that closed-source operating systems may not easily be able to provide.

    If you're interested, I'd definitely at least take a look at the Wikipedia articles for Linux and FreeBSD if you're interested! There's a long and pretty interesting history behind them.
     
  8. SandboxGeneral Moderator emeritus

    SandboxGeneral

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    #8
    Even the Android OS by Google is built on a modified Linux kernel. That's kind of a popular system, too.
     
  9. MacDawg macrumors Core

    MacDawg

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    #9
    For me personally... I spun up 2 web servers running Ubuntu Server in Azure for my work

    I have another as a VM on my MBP that runs PHPServerMonitor to monitor over 100 servers and POS devices on our network

    And I have another VM of Kali Linux to learn more about pen testing

    But yeah, enterprise Linux solutions are strong and only getting stronger
     
  10. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #10
    The linux desktop never truly came into its own, for years pundits proclaimed this was the year of linux. As we turn the page of 2018, and 2019 is around the corner, the desktop flavor of Linux is a niche, and it will probably never get beyond the 2% that it sits on now.

    Servers, that's a different question, many enterprises have multiple Linux servers, and it's been quoted as running the internet. I can't say that it does or doesn't but server installations are by far more popular. What will be interesting is IBM's purchase of Redhat. While I don't expect anything major to happen short term, its a seismic move in the industry.
     
  11. thisismyusername macrumors 6502

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    #11
    Software development is another area where Linux is widely used. Ever wonder what the software engineers who write all those web apps and web servers you encounter on a daily basis use to do their job? It's almost always Linux or a Mac. I don't think I've ever met a web frontend or backend developer who prefers Windows although I'm sure they exist. As for why do some prefer Linux to using a Mac? The answer is very similar to why lots of people prefer Android phones to iPhones (e.g. Macs are expensive, some just don't like Apple, Linux allows for more customization, etc).

    Lots of big data centers also use Linux. I wouldn't be surprised if Apple even uses Linux, instead of MacOS, for some of their data centers.

    Linux is all over the place. It's pretty much what the internet runs on.
     
  12. jwolf6589 thread starter macrumors 65816

    jwolf6589

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    #12
    Does FB and twitter use Liniux for their websites? It appears I am ignorant of Liniux usage as I was only looking at consumer and business usage in which I only see Windows or Mac.
    --- Post Merged, Dec 11, 2018 ---
    What is IOS built on?
     
  13. Shadow Jolteon, Dec 11, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2018

    Shadow Jolteon macrumors regular

    Shadow Jolteon

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    #13
    Facebook and Twitter both use Linux, and both contribute to open source projects themselves. I wasn't able to find what particular distributions they each use with a quick search, but I'm assuming they're both probably a custom build tailored more to their specific needs. There is likely some blend of operating systems across their networks, especially if you're wanting to include networking equipment in that count.

    iOS (and macOS, tvOS, etc.) is built on Darwin, which is based on FreeBSD, as I mentioned in my post above. (Unless it's Cisco IOS, which is completely proprietary.)
     
  14. Altis macrumors 68030

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    #14
    Desktop Linux isn't nearly as common as Windows and macOS primarily because those ship on nearly all computers and have for ages, so those people would have to go out of their way to install and use it despite already having access to Win/mac. Software availability ultimately prevents even users who otherwise would switch to it from doing so, though there's an argument to be made that software would be available for it if people used it. :p

    It certainly has more of a user-base in the science and engineering fields.

    Ultimately, though, as other users have pointed out, variations of Linux are used for network infrastructure. It's also common to see it used in custom devices (such as embedded or supercomputers) due to it being open source and easily customized to specific hardware.

    It's fairly common to use Linux for web development as well. Windows now includes a Subsystem for Linux (which is confusingly named, IMO) that lets you work with Linux shell commands from within Windows.
     
  15. SandboxGeneral Moderator emeritus

    SandboxGeneral

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    #15
    iOS was built on the kernel of OS X, which was also built from FreeBSD.
     
  16. jwolf6589 thread starter macrumors 65816

    jwolf6589

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    #16
    I see thanks
    --- Post Merged, Dec 11, 2018 ---
    Interesting thanks. What was the old (pre OSX) Mac kernal built on? You know the OS that used to crash allot and was referred to as OS 7.x-OS 9.x?
     
  17. SandboxGeneral Moderator emeritus

    SandboxGeneral

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  18. Shadow Jolteon macrumors regular

    Shadow Jolteon

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    #18
    The classic Macintosh operating systems were completely made by Apple.

    There were also some projects Apple was involved in during that era that involved bringing Linux and UNIX to the PowerPC platform, such as MkLinux (Linux) and A/UX (UNIX).
     
  19. SandboxGeneral Moderator emeritus

    SandboxGeneral

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    #19
    And if one wants to go back to the beginning, it all started with AT&T's Unix in the 1970's. That's where (Berkeley Software Distribution) BSD, or BSD Unix came from which violated AT&T's trademark on Unix. Which in turn was then called FreeBSD. That is where Apple took its start from and later on Linux distro's.
     
  20. jwolf6589 thread starter macrumors 65816

    jwolf6589

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    #20
    I see. So I guess before Power PC and 68K we had the Apple II which was based on proDOS (?)? I ask because thats when I first started using Apple products was during the Apple II days and as I recall those apps would not run on a 68K Mac my first being the LC III without a compatibility card which shipped with some Macs before the LC III.

    But during those days before Windows 3.11 we had MS DOS and Windows has for many years been able to run MS DOS apps until Windows 98 which was the end of MS DOS.
     
  21. SandboxGeneral Moderator emeritus

    SandboxGeneral

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    #21
    Technically, MSDOS 6.22 was the last version which ended 18 years ago, in 2000, with Windows Millennium.

    I never saw more BSOD's before or since than I did with WindowsME. :confused:
     
  22. Shadow Jolteon macrumors regular

    Shadow Jolteon

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    #22
    Sort of. PowerPC and 68K were processors, Apple II was a computer, and ProDOS was an operating system. AppleDOS, ProDOS, and SOS were all operating systems developed by Apple around that time.

    The switch in processor architecture between the two machines is likely the main reason that software didn't work on the newer computer, probably along with the operating system and other hardware differences.
     
  23. jwolf6589 thread starter macrumors 65816

    jwolf6589

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    #23
    I am glad we are out of those days except that I miss some old games and apps from the Mac 68K os 7.x days that have seen no OSX replacement.

    Lunatic Fringe from After Dark
    Prince of Persia
    Many other games

    Where in the world is Carmen Sandiego?
    Oregon Trail
    Redshift
    The animals and many others that I used to play in school.
     
  24. Shadow Jolteon macrumors regular

    Shadow Jolteon

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    #24
    Indeed, compatibility across various platforms (even within the same brand) could be a pretty complex issue back then, and a lot of great software has become extremely difficult to find and run as a result, along with various advancements and changes to computing since. Lack of archival of software and its source code is also another huge factor in software being lost in time.

    Even if you have the software, it can be quite the challenge to get it working through emulation of those old systems. At least some of those classic PC games like Prince of Persia and Oregon Trail have survived in some way since then.
     
  25. jwolf6589 thread starter macrumors 65816

    jwolf6589

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    #25
    Not the Prince of Persia classic version from 1992 that ran under OS 7.1. Not the Oregon Trail CD-ROM version from 1995.
     

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