Liquipel - Waterproof MacBook Pro. I want.

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Radiating, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. Radiating macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    #1
    They say they are working on certifying the MacBook for their process.

    http://www.liquipel.com/

    I for one can't wait for them to do so. I've had too many close calls that I would prefer to avoid with a $150 service.

    Anyone else looking forward to this being released?
     
  2. Schranke macrumors 6502

    Schranke

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    #2
    Love the idea.
    But didn't look like they have a shop set up somewhere in Europe.
    Sending my stuff to US will be to long of a time without it.
     
  3. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #3
    This wouldn't be worth it on a MacBook Pro. Think about it. An iPhone doesn't have USB ports, and vents exposed, the MacBook does. Not to mention your keyboard.
     
  4. Radiating thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Dec 29, 2011
    #4
    The Liquipel treatment makes the item waterproof inside and out. The iPhone has a 30 pin port and plenty of holes for water to leak in.

    The water will get in the device and sit there until it dries out causing no damage.

     
  5. ybz90 macrumors 6502a

    ybz90

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    #5
    I briefly looked at the tech so I'm not entirely familiar, but I'm fairly certain that it will not work with something large and complex like a MacBook, and even if it did, it would be prohibitively expensive.

    Unlike an iDevice with its relatively dense and compact build, laptops feature many small parts that cannot be coated as well as tons of exposed wires, etc. Furthermore, there are moving parts such as the fans, which obviously cannot be coated, or the heatsinks would become seriously hindered, not to mention other problems as far as components fitting together and various junctions. All in all, just not feasible for the MBP.
     
  6. BlaqkAudio macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2008
    Location:
    New York
    #6
    Looks cool, but I don't think it's worth it on a laptop. If you ever need to get the logic board replaced for some other reason, you pretty much wasted your money on the treatment.
     
  7. Arnezie macrumors 65816

    Arnezie

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    #7
    I don't know if I would want to void my warranty and AppleCare :(
     
  8. Radiating, Jan 11, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2013

    Radiating thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Dec 29, 2011
    #8
    In the US it is prohibited by federal law to void your warranty for any reason. They can only chose not to honor certain warranty claims on a case by case basis. It is also prohibited for any company to not honor a warranty for a modification to a product. There are only two exceptions. 1. If the modification makes the warranty prohibitively expensive (for example welding your MacBook shut so they can't work on it). 2. Any damage caused by the modification itself is not covered under warranty (ie if you replace your screen with a cheap Chinese one and burn your laptop to the ground, they won't cover it). But, if they think your modification damaged their product, they must have undeniable proof. They can't just verbalize a cause and effect and make guesses, so this is very strict.

    I've noticed an overwhelming number of people and far too many companies have completely absurd misconceptions about how US warranties work and what is legal and what is not, people just make up rules about how warranties work without every reading through any laws on the subject and making wild assumptions.

    Liquipel would have no effect on your warranty unless it damages something (which it won't), or you need your laptop replaced under warranty, where you'd have to pay to re-liquipel it at your expense.

    And how often does that happen? Not often.
     
  9. spoonie1972 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2012
    Location:
    Toronto
    #9
    factory pre-coated on the keyboard surface and underneath, so spills into the speakers and keys are moot... that'd be nice.
     
  10. Arnezie macrumors 65816

    Arnezie

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    #10
    Your incorrect but ok. If you allow them to crack open your MacBook Pro and apply a chemical to all of the parts and then you have an issue I can tell you your warranty is over !!!!
     
  11. Radiating thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Dec 29, 2011
    #11
    I've researched this issue and gone to court and successfully sued a company for $14,000 over it, so you can feel free to tell the judge, jury, and both lawyers that you know the law better.

    The liquipel chemical treatment is safe for electronics, and won't cause any problems. If it does cause any problems (which it won't) then you would have to cover the repair yourself.

    If the laptop malfunctions for any other reason after it has been treated with liquipel Apple is required by law to repair it or provide a replacement.

    It's also my understanding that they don't open up your item when they coat it.
     
  12. BlaqkAudio macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2008
    Location:
    New York
    #12
    Same could be said about spilling liquid on a MBP. I've had to replace the logic board once on my early '08 (due to the Nvidia defect) and twice on my early '11.

    Maybe you should look up the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.
     
  13. Arnezie macrumors 65816

    Arnezie

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    #13
    Your unrelated unsubstantiated case means nothing. You think that because you won a case that you could win against apple when they don't cover your MacBook because its been tampered with? Your obviously very ignorant as to how the laws in the United States work.

    ----------

    Familiar with it
    Although the Act covers warranties on repair or replacement parts in consumer products, warranties on services for repairs are not covered.

    The federal minimum standards for full warranties are waived if the warrantor can show that the problem associated with a warranted consumer product was caused by damage while in the possession of the consumer, or by unreasonable use, including a failure to provide reasonable and necessary maintenance.
     
  14. Radiating thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Dec 29, 2011
    #14
    Oh that's funny because I've filled cases against BMW, HP, AT&T and FedEx in small claims court and got what I wanted every single time.

    It's funny you say that I'm ignorant, because you're just some random person who has third hand knowledge about what they're talking about trying to post negative comments to be hateful.

    The law is the law. One of two things situations will happen if a company violates it.

    If it's an individial violation or some kind of mistake that they reffuse to honor, you can simply take them to court and you will get a letter a week or two before the court date where they will make everything right, plus the $75 court costs. It takes 15 minutes to file a case like this, and it's cheaper for them to follow the law than pay someone to represent them.

    If it's a systematic violation of the law, then it will be about a few months before the class action lawyers start a feeding frenzy and start seeking multi million dollar judgements.

    You're making an absurdly pointless argument. Nobody is talking about Liquipel damaging your laptop and then having Apple pay to fix the damage, except you, because you're trying to derail the thread.

    We're talking about having the service done and then the SSD module turns out to be faulty due to being manufactured with a deffect. Apple would replace it under those circumstances without issue.


    Now if you don't mind we'll get back to talking about how great this service is.
     
  15. 86nji macrumors member

    86nji

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2012
    #15
    ..I would pay for my logic board to be aquapel'd for sure
     
  16. KPOM macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #16
    What level protection did they say it would be? It would be nice if Apple incorporated this into their production process in the first place.
     
  17. 86nji macrumors member

    86nji

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2012
    #17
    my god, if I was them I would have picked up the phone to apple by now and got out of there!
     
  18. Arnezie macrumors 65816

    Arnezie

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    Oct 10, 2011
    #18

    Maybe you should take the bar exam. http://www.apple.com/legal/warranty/products/mac-english.html
    This warranty does not apply: (a) to consumable parts, such as batteries, unless failure has occurred due to a defect in materials or workmanship; (b) to cosmetic damage, including but not limited to scratches, dents and broken plastic on ports; (c) to damage caused by use with another product; (d) to damage caused by accident, abuse, misuse, liquid contact, fire, earthquake or other external cause; (e) to damage caused by operating the Apple Product outside Apple’s published guidelines; (f) to damage caused by service (including upgrades and expansions) performed by anyone who is not a representative of Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider (“AASP”); (g) to an Apple Product that has been modified to alter functionality or capability without the written permission of Apple; (h) to defects caused by normal wear and tear or otherwise due to the normal aging of the Apple Product, or (i) if any serial number has been removed or defaced from the Apple Product.
     
  19. KPOM macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #19
    To be fair, I don't think that is inconsistent with his statement. If they damage the product while servicing it, they can deny a claim, but they have to show that the product failure was caused by that damage. Small claims courts tend to be plaintiff-friendly. If I go and buy a 128GB rMBP and install an Apple 256GB SSD that someone sold me, technically I've made an unauthorized upgrade, but it may be very difficult to prove that it caused, for instance, an image retention issue on the screen.
     
  20. BlaqkAudio macrumors 6502

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    Jun 24, 2008
    Location:
    New York
    #20
    I don't get how hard it is to understand. No one is saying Apple should repair your MBP for free if Liquipel ends up damaging it. But Apple has to explicitly prove that Liquipel damaged your machine and it wasn't just a coincidence.
     
  21. Arnezie macrumors 65816

    Arnezie

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    #21
    Its not hard to understand at all , if anything goes wrong after application of Liquipel and you take it to Apple , Since you had someone (NON APPLE) modify or alter you macbook they are NOT going to cover it if they know about it.
     
  22. uhslax24 macrumors 6502

    uhslax24

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    Jul 21, 2012
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    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania USA
  23. Newfiejudd, Jan 13, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013

    Newfiejudd macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2010
    #23
    If you don't mind dismantling your MBP you can do it yourself with a treatment called Corrosion X. Look it up on youtube, it's used in the RC world all the time. And a spray can would only cost you about $19 USD.

    I use it to waterproof all my RC electrical parts. And drive them through just about everything you could imagine and it works.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyXTNYmj6ME
     
  24. Radiating thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Dec 29, 2011
    #24
    It's not that hard to understand, except for you.

    "damage caused by service ".

    Notice the word "caused". This word isn't used for fun, it's used for a very specific purpose, to exclude cases where the service caused the damage, and to cover cases where the service did not cause the damage. In fact you should have already read that when you read my first reply:

    I'll just leave it at that.
     

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