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Lockitron Introduces New $99 App-Enabled Smart Deadbolt Lock 'Bolt'

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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Lockitron today announced a new product in its lineup of smart keyless home locking system devices, the $99 Bolt. Lockitron previously entered the market a few years back with the somewhat rocky launch of an earlier smartphone-enabled deadbolt lock, and the company is now shifting gears to focus on Bolt.

The basics of the device allow users with the free-to-download app to unlock and lock their home deadbolts via Bluetooth Low Energy, meaning a user must be near the lock to interact with it, but the lock will keep working in event of a power outage.

As reported by TechCrunch, Lockitron co-founder Cameron Robertson assures customers the company has learned a lot from the problems faced with its last product. The team simplified component costs by sourcing high quality parts elsewhere, and subsequently got both the lock's price and size reduced.

Bolt is smaller, more elegant and more robust than the crowdfunded Lockitron. It has a better battery life, more fault tolerant embedded architecture and includes Lockitron's most popular features like sharing access, activity logging and Sense. Most importantly, however, Lockitron Bolt has been designed with mass manufacturing in mind from day one.
The Bolt also features sharing access to other smartphone users, activity logging to track when someone interacted with the lock, and "Sense," which either automatically unlocks the Bolt when you walk up to the door, or prompts the user with an easy-to-confirm notification. Lockitron will also sell the Bolt Bridge, which connects the Bolt to the internet and acts as a middle man to send a Bluetooth signal via a user's phone to the Bolt itself, meaning customers could unlock the deadbolt for someone else while away from home.

The new device replaces a deadbolt on a user's door altogether, versus the original's attempt at universality in fitting over an existing deadbolt. While the company's aims were admirable, many users found difficulty in setting up and properly using the slotted-on device. Lockitron decided to look to learning thermostat Nest as an example of a product that requires a signifcant amount of setup but leaves its users with a far more agreeable experience upon completion.
"Basically, as long as we could break the setup down into 20 tiny, doable steps, it didn't really matter that it required removing the old deadbolt," Robertson told TechCrunch last week.
The Lockitron Bolt can be pre-ordered from the company's official website. A Preview Edition, with a limit of 1,000 units, will begin shipping in March. A final consumer-ready edition is slated for "late Spring" and will arrive in a variety of finishes to match a user's door.

Article Link: Lockitron Introduces New $99 App-Enabled Smart Deadbolt Lock 'Bolt'
 

HackerJL

macrumors regular
Sep 19, 2009
212
62
Thank you for making a product that will work, even if there is a steeper curve to getting it there.

Smart, and a point some need to look at. So many products try to go too simple, and they turn out to be crap for 95% of the world.

Learn from Nest is a good example, yes, Grandma isn't going to replace her thermostat, but have someone do it for her, and the benefits are there!
 
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ButteryScrollin

macrumors 6502a
Jul 29, 2014
844
1,566
intertested in it, as well as the August lock.
Will see what the reviews are like.

Will this work with home kit?
 
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apple.snapple

macrumors regular
Jun 3, 2014
205
3
I refuse to buy anything until HomeKit comes to market. I don't want to buy something now and then find out it will never work with homekit.
 
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avanpelt

macrumors 68030
Jun 2, 2010
2,932
3,802
Not a smart move to require a separate piece of hardware to enable interacting with the lock remotely. Why didn't they just charge $25 or $30 more for the lock and build that functionality in? That's one of the main reasons someone would want a "connected" lock in the first place. The whole "add our proprietary bridge to your network" idea is getting old.
 
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Simm95

macrumors newbie
Sep 10, 2013
14
0
Sorry, no homekit = no buy for me.
Been waiting to buy any smarthome products until homekit integration.
 
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bbeagle

macrumors 68040
Oct 19, 2010
3,419
2,683
Buffalo, NY
This will be interesting. I sell my house - the new owners ask for the keys. Ummm... no keys. Just an iPhone app.

You don't have a smart phone? ..... Awkward!
 
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critter13

macrumors 6502
Aug 23, 2010
371
476
AppleTV

I home the appleTV homekit integration solves the "buy a hub to access this device remotely" problem. If the Apple TV could share an internet connection via bluetooth to devices like these then manufacturers could really keep the cost down.
 
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roland.g

macrumors 604
Apr 11, 2005
6,865
2,199
I originally crowdfunded Lockitron and was charged and promised a shipping date in Oct 2013 and then in Nov 2013. I finally had them refund me in fall 2014 when the product still hadn't shipped and more importantly their product was not working as advertised.

While it is interesting that they have attempted to circumvent their WiFi issues by adding a Bluetooth to WiFi bridge add-on, I cannot seriously believe or trust in the reliability of this company to deliver a product that will work as advertised. Well intentioned, but out of their league.

Truth is we are not quite there yet with smart locks for residences. I haven't seen too much out of August Lock and whether that product is working well and reliable nor whether Kevo is either. The biggest issues are battery life, reliability, and remote locking and unlocking. It isn't enough to use NFC or Bluetooth, these locks need remote monitoring and the ability to operate via WiFi.
 
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avanpelt

macrumors 68030
Jun 2, 2010
2,932
3,802
This will be interesting. I sell my house - the new owners ask for the keys. Ummm... no keys. Just an iPhone app.

You don't have a smart phone? ..... Awkward!

They'll probably just request that you reinstall the traditional lock before you leave. That's what I would do if I was buying a house with a connected door lock today.

I love the "internet of things". I have a house full of Insteon hardware that works very well. However, from what I've seen of the connected door lock market over the past few years, that specific technology has a long way to go to be reliable enough that I'd trust it to secure my home.
 
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shaark

macrumors newbie
Feb 22, 2011
6
0
Not a smart move to require a separate piece of hardware to enable interacting with the lock remotely. Why didn't they just charge $25 or $30 more for the lock and build that functionality in? That's one of the main reasons someone would want a "connected" lock in the first place. The whole "add our proprietary bridge to your network" idea is getting old.

Probably because battery life would be reduced on the lockitron if wifi was implemented. They can use Bluetooth LE to increase the time before requiring it recharged.
 
Comment

OldSchoolMacGuy

Suspended
Jul 10, 2008
4,197
9,049
I refuse to buy anything until HomeKit comes to market. I don't want to buy something now and then find out it will never work with homekit.

Can't happen with this product. Has to be all HomeKit or nothing if it's in any way a security product.

There are restrictions on which accessories can be bridged to HomeKit. For starters, Apple will not allow home automation accessories connecting over Wi-Fi, such as a Nest Thermostat, to be bridged. Those will have to go the HomeKit protocol route and become licensed MFi products.

Apple will allow some Bluetooth LE accessories to be bridged, but only those that don’t offer users control of the home. For example, a non-MFi Bluetooth lightbulb product must not be bridged. Instead, like Wi-Fi products, it would have to go through the HomeKit protocol and get MFi certification. Apple’s restrictions on bridged accessories appear to be at least partially security-related. The company also notes, for instance, that any accessory regardless of how it connects cannot be bridged if it allows physical access to a home, such as a door lock.

That doesn’t leave a lot of products that will work with a HomeKit bridge, but Apple will permit bridging of Bluetooth products that don’t provide control of the home and only provide data to HomeKit, such as a reading from a sensor. In addition, accessories that use alternative transports like ZigBee or proprietary RF sensors can be bridged, so long as they use an MFi-certified HomeKit bridge. All others wanting to support the platform will have to go through Apple’s MFi program, which will require manufacturers follow Apple’s usual long list of guidelines for connecting to the platform, use only Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, and include a MFi authentication chip.

Apple’s specs will also allow bridges to connect to other bridges, and each can connect up to 100 accessories, according to Apple’s specs. Allowing an accessory to connect a HomeKit bridge will require a MFi product approval, which means accessories that work with bridges will have to be approved first by Apple.


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Not a smart move to require a separate piece of hardware to enable interacting with the lock remotely. Why didn't they just charge $25 or $30 more for the lock and build that functionality in? That's one of the main reasons someone would want a "connected" lock in the first place. The whole "add our proprietary bridge to your network" idea is getting old.

$99 pricepoint is attractive. Just raising it $30 to $129 would have taken a HUGE cut out of sales. If they can come in sub-$100, they have a much larger potential market. As it's a feature not everyone would use, why not cut it out if it means that you can reap a ton more sales.

Is it idea? No but from a business standpoint it makes sense.
 
Comment

avanpelt

macrumors 68030
Jun 2, 2010
2,932
3,802
Probably because battery life would be reduced on the lockitron if wifi was implemented. They can use Bluetooth LE to increase the time before requiring it recharged.

Good point. I wonder if it's feasible from a technological perspective to put a solar charger on the lock? It would add to the cost of the device, no question, but perhaps it would address the battery issue -- at least for locks that face outdoors.
 
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jocamero

macrumors regular
Jul 11, 2008
140
71
Battery life. I have the current gen and it lasts a month or two. When you take out the WiFi it lasts much longer (6 month estimates).

Not a smart move to require a separate piece of hardware to enable interacting with the lock remotely. Why didn't they just charge $25 or $30 more for the lock and build that functionality in? That's one of the main reasons someone would want a "connected" lock in the first place. The whole "add our proprietary bridge to your network" idea is getting old.
 
Comment

RMo

macrumors 65816
Aug 7, 2007
1,220
215
Iowa, USA
Not a smart move to require a separate piece of hardware to enable interacting with the lock remotely. Why didn't they just charge $25 or $30 more for the lock and build that functionality in? That's one of the main reasons someone would want a "connected" lock in the first place. The whole "add our proprietary bridge to your network" idea is getting old.

Probably because battery life would be reduced on the lockitron if wifi was implemented. They can use Bluetooth LE to increase the time before requiring it recharged.

Shaark is right. The current Lockitron does have Wi-Fi built in, but they underestimated its power consumption, so it can't constantly stay on and connected. Instead, by default it turns on and checks every 30 minutes or so, or when you turn the lock (by hand or Bluetooth) or knock on the door (unlike this one, it does have a knock sensor).

This "new" Lockitron is actually pretty similar in concept to the original (pre-2012) Lockitron in that it is a full deadbolt replacement, albeit the communication methods are a bit different now. I guess it's also similar to Kevo, minus the key fobs and whatnot. August seems like a compromise between the 2012 and 2015 Lockitrons: unlike the new Lockitron, it's compatible with your existing deadbolt, but unlike the old one, it interfaces more directly with the deadbolt rather than sitting on top and trying to turn it that way. Assuming it works well, however, Lockitron now has a distinct advantage: it is the least expensive of any of these options, even more so than what I'd consider its best competitor, August (which it was still cheaper than before, too).
 
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John.B

macrumors 601
Jan 15, 2008
4,148
655
Holocene Epoch
This will be interesting. I sell my house - the new owners ask for the keys. Ummm... no keys. Just an iPhone app.

You don't have a smart phone? ..... Awkward!

You'd need to leave a generic lock for the new owners.

In fact, the realtors will need a generic lock in order to show the house to potential buyers.
 
Comment

dukeblue219

macrumors regular
Dec 18, 2012
146
257
You'd need to leave a generic lock for the new owners.

In fact, the realtors will need a generic lock in order to show the house to potential buyers.

From the article: "The team also decided to go back to their original design of replacing the deadbolt altogether (while still letting you use your old keys as a backup)"

Can't the agent just use one of your old backup keys to show the house? Same thing if you need a friend to check your pets, etc.
 
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John.B

macrumors 601
Jan 15, 2008
4,148
655
Holocene Epoch
From the article: "The team also decided to go back to their original design of replacing the deadbolt altogether (while still letting you use your old keys as a backup)"

Can't the agent just use one of your old backup keys to show the house? Same thing if you need a friend to check your pets, etc.

Missed that, thanks. And, yes, I think that's a better design.

The other thing we looked were the deadbolts with the additional keycode combinations that can easily be changed, which is what we ultimately went with despite wanting one of the cooler solutions. We just decided none of the options available were quite ready for prime time (features, reliability, cost, etc.)

When I solve this problem for good, it will probably be something that feeds a low power connection to the lock through the strike plate via the door jam (to charge a battery in the door large enough to power the servo to open the bolt).
 
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ipedro

macrumors 603
Nov 30, 2004
5,408
6,491
Toronto, ON
Aren't some people still waiting for Lockitron to deliver their lock reserved 3 years ago?

I was an original backer of Lockitron but once August Smart Lock was announced, I felt tempted to switch. I stuck with my commitment to Lockitron but they never did deliver so I was happy to go to August.

Despite some initial software kinks, I'm very happy with my August. It's beautifully built and the hardware is solid and reliable. Some bluetooth issues that I first blamed on August were in fact an iOS Bluetooth cache bug on iPhone 6 and 6 Plus.
 
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rdlink

macrumors 68040
Nov 10, 2007
3,226
2,434
Out of the Reach of the FBI
intertested in it, as well as the August lock.
Will see what the reviews are like.

Will this work with home kit?

I have an August lock, and I would not recommend it. This lock looks like it will be better than the August, but given their track record I would not buy one until they hit the market and reviews/tests start rolling in.

Personally, I'm psyched that Schlage is getting into the field, and I plan on waiting until their product gets to market before deciding which device I use to replace my August.
 
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