Logic Board Problems Due to Heat?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Crash1234, Mar 18, 2009.

  1. Crash1234 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2008
    #1
    A couple of days ago my late 08 mbp's Ethernet port stopped functioning and I had to send the computer in to apple to get a logic board replacement. I now have the computer back in my hands and it's working fine, but my concern is why the issue occurred in the first place and will it happen again? I spend a lot of time playing a game on my mbp that causes it to run close to 80degrees Celsius for many hours at a time. My computer never shut down b/c of heat or showed any other signs of issues but is it possible that having it run that hot for so long could have caused damage? I'm asking b/c I'm wondering if I should bother buying one of those laptop cooling pad things. Or maybe the damage was caused by something out of my control? Any input would be appreciated.
     
  2. SHADO macrumors 6502a

    SHADO

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Beach
    #2
    If you're worried about heat, download SMCFanControl which allows you to set the rpm's of the fans so it will stay cool. Imo, those cooling pads are a waste of money. Another thing that would help would be to prop the back of the notebook up slightly with anything, such as a thin book or a small stack of paper or something that will let air circulate underneath the MBP.
     
  3. RKpro macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2008
    #3
    A cooling pad couldn't hurt, but 80C is normal. In fact it's cool. Mine gets in that the 80-100 range when I stress the machine.

    My old windows notebook had a low end nvidia graphics, that chip got as high as 120c, and it lasted me 2 years, and it still works.
     
  4. w00t951 macrumors 68000

    w00t951

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    #4
    Actually, the normal (high) temperature for Mac is around 60, 70 degrees C, even when Photoshopping. However, in Windows, the normal idle temperature is around 70 degrees C, and in a game, it should stop rising at around 80 C. Any hight, and its time to 1) get a fan replacement 2) Clean the crap out of the computer's innards, or 3) install Boot Camp manager on the computer.
     
  5. w00t951 macrumors 68000

    w00t951

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    #5
    Actually, the normal (high) temperature for Mac is around 60, 70 degrees C, even when Photoshopping. However, in Windows, the normal idle temperature is around 70 degrees C, and in a game, it should stop rising at around 80 C. Any hight, and its time to 1) get a fan replacement, 2) Clean the crap out of the computer's innards, or 3) install Boot Camp manager on the computer.
     
  6. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Location:
    Yay Area, CA
    #6
    you know you're just getting the diode temperature and not the ambient temperature inside the casing right? the CPU temp has nothing to do with the ambient temperature of the entire motherboard.
     

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