Logic Pro 9.1.6 - Lion or Snow Leopard?

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by loby, Dec 19, 2011.

  1. loby macrumors 6502a

    loby

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    Jul 1, 2010
    #1
    Which OS X is the best to use with Logic Studio and Logic Pro?
     
  2. thestickman macrumors regular

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    Nov 21, 2010
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    Jacksonville, FL
    #2
    Unless you are using older plugins either will be fine, IMO. I had plugin issues when Lion 1st came out but those have been updated.
     
  3. John.B macrumors 601

    John.B

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    #3
  4. loby thread starter macrumors 6502a

    loby

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    #4
    Thanks for the spec's link. I reloaded my system and I am debating on staying with Snow Leopard or going with Lion. Apple will not recommend to stay with Snow Leopard if there are bugs in Lion since usually they want you to upgrade to the latest and greatest.

    If I stay with Snow Leopard, will it boot to a 64 bit and access my 8 gigs or does it mimic 64 bit since Snow Leopard boots 32 bit by default and only access 4 gigs?
     
  5. John.B macrumors 601

    John.B

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    #5
    OSX works differently from Windows w/r/t 64-bit and memory ceilings.

    Even if you boot Snow Leopard into 32-bit mode, you can still run 64-bit applications which may use more than 4GB of memory. The dependency turns out to be more hardware related than OS dependent. It really comes down to your Mac processor:
    • Core Solo or Core Duo Macs are going to be a problem (and wouldn't run Lion in any case).
    • Older Core 2 Duo Macs without 64-bit kernel or 64-bit EFI support have to boot the 32-bit kernel, but will happily run 64-bit apps, and those can access more than 4GB of RAM. IIRC, the exception is the Core 2 Duo White Macbooks.
    • The iCore processor Macs shouldn't have any problem at all.
    Also be aware that, even though Snow Leopard booted the 32-bit kernel by default, that was to maintain compatibility with third-party extensions. Depending on your particular Mac model, you may be able to run Snow Leopard in 64-bit mode, as is.
     

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