Logitech Announces HomeKit-Compatible POP Smart Button For Controlling Smart Devices

Discussion in 'iOS Blog Discussion' started by MacRumors, Apr 18, 2017.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    #1
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    Logitech today announced a new POP Smart Button, its first Apple HomeKit compatible programmable smart button for controlling connected devices around the home.

    The idea behind the original POP is to free up control of smart devices so that anyone in the home can operate them regardless of whether they have a smartphone and the associated app for each device. The latest POP builds on that premise by introducing HomeKit support, enabling it to be customized through the Apple Home app and integrate with other iOS smart home accessories.

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    The Logitech POP Smart Button Kit includes one smart button with three customizable gestures and a POP bridge to connect the button onto a WiFi network. Users can then extend control throughout their home with additional POP Add-on Smart Buttons, which are available in four colors. Each POP bridge can connect to an unlimited number of buttons.
    The POP Smart Button can also be used with non-HomeKit devices, like Sonos wireless music systems, or Logitech Harmony hub-based remote controls by using the companion Logitech POP app. In addition to compatibility with Apple HomeKit, the Logitech POP Smart Button offers the ability to control Osram lighting, Hunter Douglas and Lutron blinds, and more, extending interoperability beyond existing integrations including August, Philips Hue, and Logitech Harmony.

    The POP Smart Button will be sold in four colors: White, Alloy, Coral, and Teal. According to Logitech, the POP Smart Button Kit ($59.95) and POP Add-on Smart Button ($39.95) will be available exclusively at Apple stores and Apple.com soon, while availability in other retailers will come later this year. Owners of first generation POP Home Switches can update their software to take advantage of the new integrations, but not the HomeKit support.

    Article Link: Logitech Announces HomeKit-Compatible POP Smart Button For Controlling Smart Devices
     
  2. Kiro macrumors member

    Kiro

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    #2
    How are these buttons powered? via battery? or via magnetic impulses/piezo etc. (like the hue tab)?
     
  3. ryanwarsaw macrumors 68000

    ryanwarsaw

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    #3
    I don't understand exactly what these things do? I read the explanation in the article and still not sure what function they achieve? Is it meant so your kids who don't have smart phones can activate devices or something?
     
  4. gsmornot macrumors 68030

    gsmornot

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    #4
    It appears it is meant for anyone that is near a smart device without a smartphone. I have two Hue dimmers that I use with a pair of lamps which makes it easy. I don't see how I would use this device here though since the examples named each have something already and for about the same price, like the Lutron shades control.
     
  5. Robert.Walter macrumors 65816

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  6. gsmornot macrumors 68030

    gsmornot

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    #6
    "Using POP Smart Button with Apple HomeKit is easy when paired with Apple's Home app--POP already comes pre-paired, so discovering the device with the Home app is simple and secure."
     
  7. QuarterSwede macrumors G3

    QuarterSwede

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    #7
    Is it just an on/off button? How does it physically work?
     
  8. coolfactor macrumors 68040

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    #8
    I know, eh? $40 for a button. This world is getting crazy.
     
  9. gsmornot macrumors 68030

    gsmornot

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    #9
    If you're asking about the subject of the article I'm not sure. It looks like it would be a CR battery powered single function button that does whatever you trigger it to do. If its like the Hue Tap then each button can be one of many different functions like a scene or an action or just on/off. I don't see myself with one.
     
  10. - rob - macrumors 6502

    - rob -

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    #10
    Just dipped my toes in smart lighting w the Nanoleaf kit. It is pretty cool. There are situations when a well placed extra switch that controls scenes would be very useful.

    Smart lighting is a whole different way to think about lights in your home. You get used to the Siri control quickly, it is quite novel. I def recommend trying it out.

    I am also curious about the details of how these particular devices work.
     
  11. CarlJ macrumors 68020

    CarlJ

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    #11
    The article title and the first two paragraphs all say HomeKit-Compatible. Has the article changed that much since you commented? Or are you just guessing the article relates to home automation somehow and complaining without reading?
     
  12. CarlJ macrumors 68020

    CarlJ

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    #12
    Having to take out your phone, unlock it, and open an app to turn your lights on or off gets old quickly, whether you're a kid or not. I have Hue lights in my living room, and a Hue Dimmer Switch by the front door, and often use that physical switch to turn the lights on/off or set a scene (tapping "on" cycles through five scenes). It gets used often when coming in or going out the front door.

    FWIW, if I'm in the living room and the TV is on, I'm more likely to pick up the Siri remote and ask the Apple TV to change the state of the lights than I am to pick up my iPhone to do it (or I'll reach over and push the appropriate colorful rectangle on the touchscreen of my weather station / home automation display, but that's a different story).
     
  13. fhall1 macrumors 68040

    fhall1

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    #13
    From the article: "The Logitech POP Smart Button Kit includes one smart button with three customizable gestures" - so no - it's not just an on/off button.
     
  14. ryanwarsaw macrumors 68000

    ryanwarsaw

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    #14
    Thans for replying. I wasn't being a smart ass just didn't know. So now we need an extra button to get normal functionality back to our smart devices?
     
  15. CarlJ, Apr 18, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2017

    CarlJ macrumors 68020

    CarlJ

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    #15
    Your question didn't sound like someone being a smart ass, I hope my reply didn't either. As to need, it's a matter of what works for any given person/situation.

    My living room has a dual switch plate by the front door - one switch runs the porch light (which is now also HomeKit controlled - different story), and the other switch controls ... the ceiling fan (which could have a light - many do - but this one doesn't). So getting light when coming home at night used to involve walking across a dark room to turn on a floor lamp. Now there's a Hue dimmer switch next to that wall switch by the front door, that will turn on (or off) lights in (roughly) the four corners of the room simultaneously. Much better.

    The front porch light, BTW, was controlled by a photosensor for a long time, with fairly poor results (frequently didn't trigger at the right times, often on during the day, not always on in the early evenings). So I replaced the photosensor with an "iDevices Socket", and told HomeKit to turn it on at sunset, dim it by 10% every hour (down to 10% output at 3am) and then off at sunrise. Provides welcoming light in the evening, maneuvering light all night, and I don't have to pay any attention to it any more. I could have chosen a less involved pattern, but this one amuses me. (And it's running a rope light string that's only perhaps a dozen watts to begin with, so I'm not too worried about the couple dollars it costs to run it all year).

    FWIW, one of the most common complaints I read about Hue lights is, "well I'm not going to rework my home to accommodate them, so I plugged them into my normal wall-controlled lamp sockets and then turned them off with the wall switch, and now the hub can't control them". Well, yeah, they're tiny always-on computers. Give some thought ahead of time to how you'll make them work in your home. And people act like, "but I paid a bunch of money for these, so they should work how I expect", without having reconciled their expectations with how the technology works before spending the money (throwing money at things doesn't change the laws of physics). I have always thought one should research larger expenditures more before taking the plunge. Anyway, I'm very happy with the bits of home automation I have.
     
  16. - rob -, Apr 18, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2017

    - rob - macrumors 6502

    - rob -

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    #16
    I get where this question is coming from. "Isn't the point to get away from physical switches?"

    I can already see situations where a wireless multi-gesture scene setting "button" would make these systems much more powerful. It is not always nice to have to talk to siri to do scene changes.

    It is hard to convince someone that a lightbulbs should reasonably cost $30 each. "Why not just use the switch?"

    The setup, and even describing the components of the setup is fiddly and sounds like a big barrier to entry. Apple sells and promotes the Nanoleaf Smarter start kit but I just set that thing up and the setup is not a great experience. The app is bad.

    But once you have installed homekit lighting and get a feel for what the future of lighting is like I think you would be sold and not dismiss bringing a physical 'smart' switch back into the picture.

    Particularly in homes with older electrical systems and lighting controls, you can sort of magically bring them into the future with what previously would have required some other expensive changes that required you to shut down power at the circuit breaker and do light wiring duty.

    I think the impact is big and the difference in life experience for some will probably be similar to "I don't need or want an iPhone" to "How weird it was that I used to not have an iPhone." The corollary being, "I don't want smart lighting" to "How weird it was when I used to have to go room to room turning off all the lights."

    Homekit lighting it really is something you have to see and experience to realize the value.
     
  17. splogue macrumors 6502

    splogue

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    #17
    Each button has three functions: single-click, double-click, and long-click.

    They have a coin battery inside that lasts around five years before replacing it, and can be either stuck on a wall or object using the included tape on the backs, or placed on a table for portability.

    When pressed, the buttons send signals to a small hub that plugs into an electrical outlet.

    The beauty of them is that they can then be tied into a smart home to control several devices across multiple manufacturers.

    For example, I have one stuck on the front of my fireplace mantel that, when pressed, turns on the television, soundbar, and sets all the correct inputs. Press it again and it turns everything off.

    Double-clicking it also turns on and adjusts the brightness and color for the six different lights in that room.

    No fiddling with smartphones, remotes, or apps, and anyone can easily use it after they know the button is there.

    It is great news that all I need is a new hub to add HomeKit control to my existing POP switches, because I have a lot of them. I'll be buying that as soon as it comes online at the Apple site so I can add my HomeKit devices, like my door locks, into the mix of things they can control.

    Sean
     
  18. Fer Oz macrumors newbie

    Fer Oz

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    Apr 19, 2017
    #18
    --- Post Merged, Apr 19, 2017 ---
    This means that with this new Pop switch you'll be abble to use Siri to activate every function of the button eventhou the smart things connected aren't HomeKit compatible?
     
  19. QuarterSwede macrumors G3

    QuarterSwede

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    #19
    Ah, I missed that when reading it. Thanks!
     
  20. - rob - macrumors 6502

    - rob -

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    Oakland, CA
    #20
    It appears this still is not available for sale on apple.com. The Amazon ones are not homekit ready.

    Anyone seen this in stores?
     

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