iPad Logitech Lightning keyboard turned my air 2 into a full fledged computer

Discussion in 'iPad' started by MikeCBR, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. MikeCBR macrumors member

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    Dec 5, 2014
    #1
    If you really want a good typing experience on the Air 2 I will have to point you to the wired logitech lightning keyboard. This keyboard has been amazing. No pairing nonsense of bluetooth, no small tiny keys you have to deal with, just a nice keyboard to type on with the reliability of being wired.

    This keyboard has turned my Air 2 into a full fledged computer. With pages to create documents, and a wired printer, what more do you need?

    I didn't even turn on my computer last week. The Air 2 is in reality, a productivity workhorse. If not for the need of itunes to transfer files every now and then, I would of thrown the desktop pc in the garbage already...or donate it to charity(does have a quad core cpu).

    The one issue with the keyboard is that you can't charge the ipad air 2 while it's plugged in. I'm not sure if there is an adapter that you can get. But since the air 2 battery lasts well over 20 hours...unless you plan to type for 20 hours straight...it's probably not an issue as long as you keep your ipad air charged regularly.
     
  2. Rocket Man macrumors member

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    Oct 28, 2014
    #2
    The Logitech hinges tend to have a rather troubleling failure rate. My girlfriend had one give up on her. Hang on to that warranty. She now enjoys a Clam Case Pro on her Air 1. I really want one for my air 2. They are not cheap however...
     
  3. MikeCBR thread starter macrumors member

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    #3
  4. sracer macrumors 603

    sracer

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    #4
    Very nice. I like their Ultrathin keyboard cover for my iPad 4. The thing that I really miss is some kind of support for a pointing device... mouse, trackpad, or more important, trackpoint. That's not Logitech's fault, that's on Apple.
     
  5. Skika macrumors 68030

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  6. ephemeralreason macrumors regular

    ephemeralreason

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    #6
    No, Dropbox does that.
     
  7. kingtj macrumors 68020

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    #7
    Sure....

    Until your broadband internet connection is lost for whatever reason.

    I really do like DropBox (and use it along with Google Drive on my iPad fairly regularly).

    But the file system comment makes a very valid point, IMO. There are reasons tablets really don't cut it as complete computer replacements, and lack of mass storage and a true file system is a big part of it.

    Lack of screen space is another. (No matter how many pixels they cram in with high-res retina displays, you still fight the problem that everything has to be designed so your finger can easily navigate and select options.) A mouse pointer is a LOT thinner than your fingertip - so traditional OS's can fit a lot more in a given amount of screen space. That's why so many iOS versions of apps are watered down compared to the Windows or Mac editions.

     
  8. JuryDuty macrumors 6502

    JuryDuty

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    Sep 22, 2014
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    Texas
    #8
    Or OneDrive. That's what I use, along with Office 365 for the Mac/iPad.

    It's amazing that you really can pretty much replace your desktop experience with an iPad.

    My favorite keyboard is the Logitech K760 solar bluetooth keyboard. It's a full-sized keyboard that connects to up to three devices via bluetooth. I use it for my MBPro, my iPad and my iPhone. Never needs charging because it's solar and super easy to carry around. Love this stuff!

    PS. You can get it new for about $35 on ebay--easily half the price of Amazon.
     
  9. oneMadRssn macrumors 68040

    oneMadRssn

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    #9
    I'm not sure I understand why this is superior to Bluetooth. I have the Logitech K810 keyboard, and it's paired to my work laptop, my iphone, and my ipad at the same time, with easy switching between those devices, and no connectivity problems.

    What is the benefit of a wired keyboard? Especially for an ipad?
     
  10. JuryDuty macrumors 6502

    JuryDuty

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    Sep 22, 2014
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    Texas
    #10
    True, and for this reason I wouldn't get rid of my desktop in place of my iPad--there are still things a desktop does better.

    But between wifi and LTE, I can pretty much have a good Internet connection anywhere, so that's not an issue for many of us.
     
  11. MikeCBR thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 5, 2014
    #11

    The issue with bluetooth at times is that it disconnects and goes into standby mode. Bluetooth can also have sync issues and input lag which is common. You can also have interference issues from the bluetooth connection. Additionally there is a security factor. Since Bluetooth transmits wirelessly someone in the vicinity can capture your key strokes and digitally Eavesdrop on whatever you are typing. This is a common practice in corporate/government espionage. Police, CIA, FBI, also are able to capture bluetooth transmissions...as well as sophisticated thieves that hang out at your local starbucks.
     
  12. sracer macrumors 603

    sracer

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    #12
    Not everyone has that keyboard (which is pretty pricey). But in addition to that, there's the benefit of not having yet another device that needs to be charged. Keep the wired keyboard in a backpack and it is always ready to go.

    My experience with BT keyboards is that they don't hold a charge for extended periods of time. When I plan on using a keyboard with my iPad, I'll make sure that it's fully charged.
     
  13. oneMadRssn macrumors 68040

    oneMadRssn

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    #13
    I agree it is pretty pricey. I got both of mine used, for about $50 each. One in the marketplace section here, and another from Amazon warehouse deals. As for charge, the one at work I use for 10+ hours a day, and it's going strong 3 weeks now. The other keyboard (K650-something?) I considered was solar, obviating the need for charging.
     
  14. ephemeralreason macrumors regular

    ephemeralreason

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    Apr 9, 2012
    #14
    Since my Air 2 has cellular service I find access to Dropbox not to be an issue. If one plans to use the iPad as their primary device, it's wise to get the cellular model and T Mobile's free 200 mb of data per month means that I don't have to buy a plan.

    ----------

    Definitely lots of good services; I managed to grab a deal for Box and have 50gb of storage for free.
    I'm partial to Apple's BT keyboard, but I really only use that at home. Out and about, or in my office I just use the on screen keyboard, which I think works well.
     
  15. scaredpoet macrumors 604

    scaredpoet

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    #15
    This all of course boils down to what some users need in a computer, versus others. The assumption here is being made that ALL users require a traditional file system. However, that's not the case. Certainly you are accustomed to one, and I am as well. However the fact remains that not all users of computing devices require something that sophisticated, or their workflow could be quite advanced but totally agnostic of a filesystem-based workflow.

    And to be fair: if I lose my broadband internet connection, 98% of the work I do on my MacBook Air or iMac is pretty much dead in the water, and 100% of the stuff I do as part of my job. I'll have a filesystem, sure, but an inability to move those objects in or out of that filesystem would kill any usefuleness of the work done.

    In this regard, my iPad is actually better: mine has a cellular connection built in. The Macs don't. If my home broadband goes down, my MBA and iMac are dependent on my iOS devices and their hotspot capability to stay functional.
     
  16. TacticalDesire macrumors 68020

    TacticalDesire

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    Michigan
    #16
    If one is an incredibly light user with no need for physical media such as USB, firewire etc., no need for real programs, no need for a file system (drop box is a work around not a replacement), and no need for an external/larger display then an iPad makes a viable replacement to a desktop/laptop. For every other use case it falls flat on its face. I personally wouldn't cripple myself with one unless I absolutely had to. If in some other dimension my only option was a tablet to get work done, I would choose a Windows one anyway.
     
  17. donnaw macrumors 65816

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    #17
    Well said. I'm retire now and my iPad fulfills all my needs such as email, browsing, light games, even simple Word docs (we have a subscription because others in my family unit have the need for complex work), etc. but if I were still working it would not even come close.

    To add to your requirements:
    1). Capability to attach multiple docs to an email (I can't even imagine the confusion my team would have had I sent 10 emails, each with one of the docs associated with a project, let lone their requirements to keep them together).
    2) Capability to attach a doc to an email reply. Again, confusion all over the place.

    The business world has more muscular requirements. Those who say that the iPad replaces a full-fledged computer just have more simple needs.
     
  18. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    Hawaii, USA
    #18
    Check out the application called Documents, developed by Readdle. It's free, and serves pretty nicely as a file system replacement. With the application open you can mount the iPad (or iPhone) to your computer as a removable drive, loading what ever you want into it. Documents can open many file formats natively, otherwise you can use the "Share" button to open the file in another app. Use Airdrop to send files to other iOS devices (or computers that support it), and send files received through Airdrop to Documents for storage.

    It's one of my most-used applications. Readdle makes some very nice software, but Documents is probably the most useful, and I can't think of any competing applications. It's still amazing to me that they're not charging for it.
     

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