Ywaismann

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 19, 2017
6
0
Hello, some questions regarding temperature

1) What is the long term damage of high temperature on a MBP? i just know that it shortens battery life.

2) I game from time to time and my MBP gets up to 71-75 Celsius degrees, (2 hours a day).
2.1) is that too high and its the damage range?
2.2) i know i could play with fans manually to decrease it to 60, but ive hears it will just wear out fans over time, so im not sure whats worse - Manualy increasing fans or letting it run on 72 celsius degrees

3) When im not gaming and studying ( pdf, youtube, office, etc) im at around 41-43, is that ok?


Thanks fellas, ive stopped gaming altogether untill i get an answer as i dont want to damage my mac
 

Nixir

macrumors member
Jul 15, 2011
94
92
Toronto
Keep the fan up. The fan wears out a lot slower than the damage to internal components caused by chronic high heat.
 

Ywaismann

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 19, 2017
6
0
Keep the fan up. The fan wears out a lot slower than the damage to internal components caused by chronic high heat.
thanks!

at which temperature internal components are damaged? even at 70?
what is the temperature i should keep my MBP at while gaming?
 

Trusteft

macrumors 6502a
Nov 5, 2014
666
655
You are fine, don't worry about it.
But if you game or do anything else that heats it up and you manually not let it cool itself with the fans, you are asking for trouble.
 

Ywaismann

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 19, 2017
6
0
You are fine, don't worry about it.
But if you game or do anything else that heats it up and you manually not let it cool itself with the fans, you are asking for trouble.

Manualy dont let it cool? im not sure i understood.

my fans control are systemic, so that fans work as apple wanted them to,

you mean i SHOULD manualy control them when it heats up? if so, from which temp?
 

Trusteft

macrumors 6502a
Nov 5, 2014
666
655
Manualy dont let it cool? im not sure i understood.

my fans control are systemic, so that fans work as apple wanted them to,

you mean i SHOULD manualy control them when it heats up? if so, from which temp?
Misunderstanding. I thought you were manually switching them off.
 

missyagogo

macrumors newbie
Oct 9, 2016
24
17
Hello, some questions regarding temperature

1) What is the long term damage of high temperature on a MBP? i just know that it shortens battery life.

2) I game from time to time and my MBP gets up to 71-75 Celsius degrees, (2 hours a day).
2.1) is that too high and its the damage range?
2.2) i know i could play with fans manually to decrease it to 60, but ive hears it will just wear out fans over time, so im not sure whats worse - Manualy increasing fans or letting it run on 72 celsius degrees

Thanks fellas, ive stopped gaming altogether untill i get an answer as i dont want to damage my mac

When I game on my tMBP, I raise the back of it up using these: http://usa.just-mobile.com/lazy-couch-594.html They work great and are cheap! I don't use a case on my MBP while gaming. I wouldn't recommend blocking any portion of the MBP's vents when gaming and make sure there is plenty of air flow underneath the MBP. I don't use an app to increase my fan speed. I just let the fans work as intended in their default setting.

Good luck and hope you get back to gaming soon!
 

ZapNZs

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2017
2,310
1,158
Which MBP do you have?

I think the risk of higher temperatures will vary by individual model revision more than by brands/product lines because there is so much variation by individual model revision. For example, high-heat with the 2011 15/17-inch MBPs are equated with severe GPU issues, where as the 13-inch 2011 has proven itself in being able to cope with prolonged heat. Further, the late 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017 15-inch models have also established themselves as doing a solid job coping with the heat (obviously there are no long term reports yet on the most recent models.) (I also would not be that surprised if the long-term thermal implications had at least some variances determined by individual specimen, given how the quality of the thermal paste/solder jobs vary, and even to some degree the CPU efficiency can vary.)

I would estimate that my 15-inch has spent about 10,000-ish hours at around 100C (well around 190-200F - damn you metric system!) with the fans at 6200 RPM and during the past 3 years I think it has been turned on for all but about 24 hours, and 98% of that time it is connected to two displays (meaning dGPU is running and producing more heat.) My buddy just hit it with the full evaluation with his goodies in the Apple Service Toolkit and gave it a clean bill of health. I do not use software to override the fan settings. (I do occasionally clean the fans.)

(It definitely does shorten the service life of the battery somewhat, but the way I see it is the system is designed to be used!)
 
Last edited:

Ywaismann

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 19, 2017
6
0
ive got a macbook pro 15 touchbar 2017, so i realy shouldnt mess with my fans manually?

Ive managed to keep my mac at 60 celsius during gaming with fans manualy set to around 3700 rpm , should i just let the mac take care of the fans itself? if i do that the MBP keeps itself at 72 celsius with 2800-3000 rpm.

Im still not sure whats worse, chronic high temperature or chronic high fan rpg (manualy)
[doublepost=1512211054][/doublepost]
Which MBP do you have?

I think the risk of higher temperatures will vary by individual model revision more than by brands/product lines because there is so much variation by individual model revision. For example, high-heat with the 2011 15/17-inch MBPs are equated with severe GPU issues, where as the 13-inch 2011 has proven itself in being able to cope with prolonged heat. Further, the late 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017 15-inch models have also established themselves as doing a solid job coping with the heat (obviously there are no long term reports yet on the most recent models.) (I also would not be that surprised if the long-term thermal implications had at least some variances determined by individual specimen, given how the quality of the thermal paste/solder jobs vary, and even to some degree the CPU efficiency can vary.)

I would estimate that my 15-inch has spent about 10,000-ish hours at around 100C (well around 190-200F - damn you metric system!) with the fans at 6200 RPM and during the past 3 years I think it has been turned on for all but about 24 hours, and 98% of that time it is connected to two displays (meaning dGPU is running and producing more heat.) My buddy just hit it with the full evaluation with his goodies in the Apple Service Toolkit and gave it a clean bill of health. I do not use software to override the fan settings. (I do occasionally clean the fans.)

(It definitely does shorten the service life of the battery somewhat, but the way I see it is the system is designed to be used!)
oops, i ment to replay to you
 
Last edited:

leman

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2008
13,820
9,589
The damaging effect of heat is greatly exaggerated. If you are using your laptop normally, it operates within its design parameters, meaning that it’s built to tolerate any heat buildup it itself can produce. Sure, higher temperatures accelerate the deterioration of electronic components, but your laptop will most likely fail because of some preexisting weak points long before it dies from heat.
 

ZapNZs

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2017
2,310
1,158
ive got a macbook pro 15 touchbar 2017, so i realy shouldnt mess with my fans manually?

Ive managed to keep my mac at 60 celsius during gaming with fans manualy set to around 3700 rpm , should i just let the mac take care of the fans itself? if i do that the MBP keeps itself at 72 celsius with 2800-3000 rpm.

Im still not sure whats worse, chronic high temperature or chronic high fan rpg (manualy)
[doublepost=1512211054][/doublepost]
oops, i ment to replay to you

72C is not very hot at all. The model MBP you have does a very good job at dealing with heat. Personally, I do not feel in most cases that it is worth modifying the default fan behavior. YMMV.
 

evec

macrumors regular
Jun 8, 2016
228
68
The weakest point of laptop for temp is Battery, and your body:cool:, so system will monitor the temperature to prevent the metal case overheat and battery without limit (<42C).
The CPU tend to withstand very high temperature, up to 100C operating temperature and normally the strongest part of the system, the mainboard will maintenance around 50-60C at full power, by theory will degrade the capacitor faster, but actually MacBook use polymer and MLCC will easy with endurance for more that 20years @ 7x24 working.
 
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buran-energia

macrumors 6502
Oct 9, 2017
284
104
70C for cpu cores while gaming? It's nothing... The 13' 2015 I have gets to 90-100C during some 3D games. I've actually seen it get to 105C - the maximum allowed. But I don't use it for gaming. I'd do that on the 13' TB (let alone 15' TB), though, due to it having 2 fans and much better gpu.
 

Queen6

macrumors G3
Hello, some questions regarding temperature

1) What is the long term damage of high temperature on a MBP? i just know that it shortens battery life.

2) I game from time to time and my MBP gets up to 71-75 Celsius degrees, (2 hours a day).
2.1) is that too high and its the damage range?
2.2) i know i could play with fans manually to decrease it to 60, but ive hears it will just wear out fans over time, so im not sure whats worse - Manualy increasing fans or letting it run on 72 celsius degrees

3) When im not gaming and studying ( pdf, youtube, office, etc) im at around 41-43, is that ok?


Thanks fellas, ive stopped gaming altogether untill i get an answer as i dont want to damage my mac

Your Mac has no issue regarding temperature, best you can do is purchase a passive cooler to elevate the rear of the notebook to help the convection effect. No need to manually override the cooling fans as your not really pushing the MBP to it's limits.

Q-6
 
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