Other Longer cable means longer charging time?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by novetan, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. novetan macrumors 6502

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    Sep 3, 2010
    #1
    Generally question.

    Is it true the longer the cable, the longer the charging time to devices such as iPhone or iPad for whatever model?
     
  2. Strelok macrumors 6502a

    Strelok

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    #2
    Depends on the quality of the cable, most cables should be fine no matter the length.
     
  3. novetan thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #3
    Sorry, double posting. Pls reply to the other thread. Tks
     
  4. orev macrumors 6502

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    #4
    There is no other thread/double post.

    Yes, it can be true. A longer cable causes more voltage drop, and that can affect charging speed. Google around and some have done tests showing that it is true.
     
  5. BigMcGuire Contributor

    BigMcGuire

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    #5
    As long as you have a heavy duty wall plug, shouldn't matter. I have a 60w Anker 6 port charger and I can't tell the difference if I use an Anker 6ft or 3ft cable.

    Cheap no-name brand cables (non-mfi certified) definitely cap out at under 1 amp in my experience.
     
  6. noobinator macrumors 603

    noobinator

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  7. orev, Jan 9, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 12, 2018

    orev macrumors 6502

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    #7
  8. cbreze macrumors 6502

    cbreze

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    #8
    My 6 foot cable takes roughly twice as long to charge my 7 as my 3 footer. Not a problem as I prefer a slow over nite charge anyway.
     
  9. joeblow7777 macrumors 603

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    Sep 7, 2010
    #9
    Unless this cable provides considerable resistance I wouldn't have thought that it makes a difference.
     
  10. bigjnyc macrumors 603

    bigjnyc

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    #10
    Unless you're being sarcastic or joking, you need a new cable. Even if there was a difference, no way it would be that significant.
     
  11. cbreze macrumors 6502

    cbreze

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    #11
    I'm serious and have used the cable for over a year now and plugging in for an overnite charge. I've always had good luck with batteries and prefer a slower charge. On those rare occasions I need a quicker charge during the day the oem 3 footer charges about twice as quick by my estimation. Nothing wrong with the cable or slow charging. If there was I'd have certainly had issues by now. I only commented because I thought the OP might be interested in hearing about it.
     
  12. barjam macrumors 6502

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    Jul 4, 2010
    #12
    Absolutely true. You want as short as cable as you can on the USB side.

    The iPad chargers allow you to swap out for an extension cord on the 110 side, do that for a longer overall cord.
     
  13. novetan, Jan 11, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 12, 2018

    novetan thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #13
    Tks all for replies. Interesting abt the positive constructive argument here
    --- Post Merged, Jan 11, 2018 ---
    Tks for the link. Both seems to be well researched.

    However, most normal electrical stores simply carried a tonne of cables without any spec and those are very affordable. So does it means to have a reliable cable without getting quick breakdown, is to purchase fr Apple itself or very reliable specialist shop which obviously will burn a hole in our pocket. Perhaps getting a cheap cable and change it when necceasry is more worthwhile.
     
  14. cynics macrumors G4

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    Jan 8, 2012
    #14
    Higher resistance due to poor quality or damaged cable will increase charging times. For a QUALITY cable length wont matter assuming we are talking reasonable lengths.

    If you notice a significant difference in charging time than replace the cable. Also inspect the pins on the ends, if any are burnt/discolored/corroded replace the cable. If the cable works on in one direction again replace it. Cable can actually increase stress on components and/or damage the charging port of the iPhone. Not worth the risk.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 11, 2018 ---
    Just get MFi certified Lightning cables. Amazonbasic cables are fairly afforded and are certified from Apple. While they feel a little cheap the only failures I've had with them have been my fault. I have yet to wear the cable out like I do with Apples own cables.
     
  15. NoBoMac macrumors 65816

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    Jul 1, 2014
    #15
    The Anker brand of cables deliver the same power-load over all their lengths, and they are cheaper than anything Apple sells. Sold on Amazon. Hear good things about Monoprice. I also use Amazon Basics and have been happy with them.

    That said, I have a 6ft cable from some no-name company and it too can charge my phone quickly on a 12w 2.4A charger (about 1:20 for 0-100%).
     
  16. novetan thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 3, 2010
    #16

    To extend the topic, will fast charger damage the battery? I read some articles and appears there are 2 camps. May not hv read enough. I hv asked Apple this q an its obvious their answer is No.

    I believed Apple has a fast charger which is 29W as against the stock socket which is abt 5W. Whats your opinion if I get a charger higher than 29W . Not sure whether is it available though. Sorry am not tech savvy.
     
  17. cynics macrumors G4

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    Jan 8, 2012
    #17
    The internal circuitry prevents over current. So it will only use so much power as it needs without damaging itself.

    Technically speaking, heating a battery up isn't great for it and sometimes high wattage chargers will do that. Effect on battery health would probably be negligible though.

    Personally I wouldn't worry to much about it. Just avoid doing dumb stuff like using frayed and burnt cables and junky chargers.
     
  18. Relentless Power, Jan 12, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018

    Relentless Power macrumors Core

    Relentless Power

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    #18
    Just want to add, that it's important to make sure that any offbrand of cable used for any iOS device is MFI certified. If it's not, they can be problematic In providing inconsistency with charging.
     
  19. NoBoMac macrumors 65816

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    #19
    This.

    When I said "no name" t was some brand other than the usual suspects, but, was labeled as MFi and bought from reputable store (Home Depot).
     
  20. HallStevenson macrumors 6502a

    HallStevenson

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    #20
    "Research" isn't really necessary - it's physics. Voltage drops occur over distances. The thinner the wire, the more it drops.
     
  21. Saskat macrumors member

    Saskat

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    Mar 27, 2017
    #21
    In theory, yes. But the difference should be neglectable unless there is something else going on. Copper has very low resistance.
     
  22. IHelpId10t5 macrumors 6502

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    Nov 28, 2014
    #22
    For all of our education, I would like to hear from an actual electrical engineer about this because your physics understanding is different than mine. My limited electrical knowledge tells me that DC voltage only drops over great distances (which is why the future of the distance power grid will likely involve cross-country DC high-voltage transmission lines). And, if a cable that is being used over only a few feet has enough resistance to cause a charging difference, then this would generate heat that could be really dangerous and cause a fire.

    Therefore, I guess what I am saying is that with a quality cable (with a suitable conductor size and quality), I can't imgaine that a few feet can make any difference at all. However, with a cheap cable, anything is possible including cable heating or even damage to the device due to inferrior circutry.
     
  23. adamhenry macrumors 65816

    adamhenry

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    #23
    Blog discussing this subject.
    As the above article discusses, the wiring does have a resistance that affects charging rate. You can check the resistance yourself using this resistance calculator. The trick is finding the size of the wiring used in a cable.
     

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