Looking for an app to organize documents (help me remember the name of it)

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Rockoar, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. Rockoar macrumors regular

    Rockoar

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    Mar 8, 2012
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    Paris (France)
    #1
    Hi there, I was looking for an application/software to organize the documents I have on my Mac. A few weeks ago I found one which name I can’t seem to remember. The only thing I remember is that it had a shell-shaped logo and that it was kind of expensive. Can someone help me remember the name of that application or recommend me another one?

    I tried iDocument Plus (available on the AppStore) but I wasn’t quite satisfied…

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Michaelgtrusa macrumors 604

    Michaelgtrusa

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    #3
    The dev of iDocument is lacking on the up to date side. I wouldn't bother with them, not a serious dev.
     
  3. Rockoar, Jan 7, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015

    Rockoar thread starter macrumors regular

    Rockoar

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    #4
    Thanks! It was Devonthink, I’ll give it a try. And thanks too for the input regarding iDocument Pro, the idea is great but the application not so…
     
  4. Cassady macrumors 6502a

    Cassady

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    #5
    Well worth paying a visit to Devonthink's forums -- plenty of information there about what it can do. DTPO remains one of my core applications on my Mac, although (obviously) YMMV.
     
  5. BrianBaughn macrumors 601

    BrianBaughn

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    #6
    Just heard about a new(?) document organization app, DocMoto (docmoto.com). Might be worth a look.
     
  6. robgendreau macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    #7
    FYI I think the Winterfest 2014 promo is still going; you can get DevonThink Pro (and some other great applications like Nisus Writer, Scrivener, etc) for 25% off.

    DTP is WELL worth it. One of the best applications I ever invested in. I keep finding new uses for it (the latest is to use its indexing function to index/catalog the contents of bare drives I use for offside backup and storage; that way I know what's on them without having access).

    Rob
     
  7. Rockoar thread starter macrumors regular

    Rockoar

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    Location:
    Paris (France)
    #8
    Thank for all the replies! I wasn’t unable to connect to the forums until recently. I’m currently evaluating the option of purchasing DevonThink due to the fact that they offer a student special price. Any recommendations on why should I jump to the Pro version versus the standard one?
     
  8. onekerato macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    #9
    The big difference is you can have multiple databases in the Pro version. Keeps your content organized.

    You can buy Personal edition now, and get the upgrade from Personal to Pro later if you wish by paying the difference in cost ($30.)
     
  9. Cassady macrumors 6502a

    Cassady

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    #10

    The Pro version also includes AbbyFineReader for OCR'ing PDF's etc., which might be very useful as a student, depending on what you're studying, of course. It also allows integration with the Mail App - and RSS feeds.
     
  10. Rockoar thread starter macrumors regular

    Rockoar

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    #11
    What’s the advantage of having multiple databases? I don’t really understand… do you care to explain to me, please?
     
  11. Cassady macrumors 6502a

    Cassady

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    #12

    Simply means you can have a Work, Personal, Academic etc etc database. You could throw it all together - but certain of the AI features in DTP work better when your DBs are organised according to themes - I.e your personal db has certain 'trends'/patterns in it that the AI will recognise easily, as its unique to the files you put in that personal DB. Your Academic DB will have different patterns, as opposed to your Work DB.

    As mentioned, you could put them all together- but being able to use separate DBs is really useful!
     
  12. Rockoar thread starter macrumors regular

    Rockoar

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  13. Basilfawltyone macrumors regular

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    Sep 2, 2013
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #14
    I have used Devonthink Pro Office for a week now and I am very impressed.

    Can not find anything that I can not get the application to do for me.

    Learning curve is long so you need time, but I already feel now that this is my app. I store music in iTunes, photos in iPhoto but more or less the rest in Devonthink.

    Pdf, png, mail, .pages, .numbers, Ebooks, webpages, clips, you name it and it fits.

    I understand why lawyers and doctors use it, it keeps ALL files containing my information in one place with a fantastic search function.

    On top a great support and an active users forum.

    Syncs to iOS over WiFi. Though first that was bad, wanted ICloud, but realize now that I really don't want all my files just a password away in a cloud I don't control.

    Recommended, even if the user interface is slightly dated.
     
  14. IHelpId10t5 macrumors 6502

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    Nov 28, 2014
    #15
    The application(s) you want are built into the Mac OS -- they are called "Finder" and "Spotlight Search". Learn how to use the built-in features and directory structure of your Mac and you will simply not need to resort to 3rd party applications. Put simply, if you can't organize or find your files on your Mac then you either need to invest some time in learning how to use the OS or you are "doing it wrong".

    In managing Macs and PCs for thousands of people over my career I have seen this over and over. Users that refuse to organize their documents when saving them then want some magical software solution that can read their minds and find anything instantly. Unfortunately, both Apple (Finder "All My Files"), and Microsoft (Explorer "Libraries") have attempted to cater to these users but have instead just perpetuated the issue. I can't tell you how many times I've asked someone where they saved a file and received an answer of "on my hard drive".

    To instantly elevate your status as a Mac power user you simply need to learn the [command]-[spacebar] shortcut to using Spotlight to instantly find or launch anything on your Mac in a few keystrokes.
     
  15. Cassady macrumors 6502a

    Cassady

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    #16
    I beg to differ.

    I am in academia, and have always been meticulous with storing my data. Nested folders, naming regime, tagging. Yes, Finder/Spotlight does a fine job of locating individual files, or several that meet a range of criteria >> IF you know what you are looking for...

    By that I mean, all the nested folders and proper storage methodology in the world is still limiting when you are faced with 2000/5000/10000 documents. It's like walking into a public library, without really knowing what you want, only that you want to find something interesting. Or sitting down at your computer with the Google search bar open before you – yes, you can find anything, but what to look for?

    The above is not directly related to what you were saying – yes, Finder/Spotlight can locate the file, just like the library catalogue will. But where Finder/Spotlight fall flat, and where any decent document/information manager will excel, is placing you, the user, in control of that library.

    I needed something like Devonthink to finally give me access to my information. It was always there, I could always find what I thought I needed, but I didn't have true access. The moment you cross the threshold of a couple hundred documents, your ability to 'control' that library diminishes exponentially. That is where a document manager becomes essential. It unlocks all that information, and provides access to it in any which way you need it – and often times, in ways you never realised you needed.

    No doubt any Mac Power User can use Finder/Spotlight/Alfred/Launchbar/QuickSilver to find stuff. But if you need to manage stuff, and gain control over what exactly that stuff is – then Finder/Spotlight is the beginning – not the end.

    To be clear, if you're simply needing a system to occasionally find where you saved that last utility bill, or funny attachment, or work Report – then yes, applying sensible storage mechanics in conjunction with Spotlight/Finder (and OSX tags) will be more than sufficient. Anything more rigorous than that, and I'd reason you need to careful that you don't end up limiting what is possible, simply by virtue of not appreciating what is possible.
     
  16. Basilfawltyone macrumors regular

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    Sep 2, 2013
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #17
    I agree with the fact that if I could I would use just Apples software.

    Hands down.

    I erased Microsoft Office from my MBP and LOVE Pages even if not so advanced according to many people, I like iTunes and iiPhoto. Easy to work with and to sort and present my stuff.

    When it comes to finder and Spotlight what Apple lacks, and that's a big lack!, Is I would like to have all info re. I.e. A law case in ONE easy to sort, read and edit folder. So, files made by Mail, Pages, QuickTime, .pdf and so on in ONE AND THE SAME FOLDER on my Mac, iPhone and iPad.

    When looking at the presentation Apple first did about ICloud Drive I though that was what was going to happen.

    But Apple is not there yet, and on top of it, I realize now that I want my sometimes sensitive information encrypted on my physical unit and not in a cloud a password away.

    I get most of this with Devonthink and OneSafe.

    i also like the fact that Devonthink "reads" the new files that I drag over or scan to it, uses its Artificial Intelligence and proposes a folder/group to store it in. Smart and saves time.

    Finally, to search in the database of emails on my iPhone takes minutes, sometimes hours and needs a lot of cellular data. To search inside the Devonthink database normally under 0.1 seconds.

    So I agree, Aplle have the tools but they are not to be used yet.
     
  17. robgendreau macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    #18
    Gee, one wonders why anyone bothered to invent Mac database software since all we need is Spotlight and the Finder....:rolleyes:

    Sorry for the snark, but I think the OP got JUST what they were looking for. Spotlight doesn't index everything. Images need metadata added, and although Spotlight indexes some exif/IPTC metadata, Finder does a poor job of organizing and displaying it. Finder doesn't do OCR. It doesn't sync with mobile devices. It doesn't have a browser built in. It won't store virtual copies of things with other things, short of using aliases. And on top of that, the Mac filesystem is outdated, and so is the Finder (geez, I can even do some things in Windows File Explorer that I can't in the Finder).

    I agree with you that people should get to know the filesystem and Spotlight better. And I strongly believe in tags too, although it seems they just aren't catching on with Mac users, which is a pity.

    But no way no how could I manage photos, mail and documents in the Finder as I do with something like DevonThink. Not even close.

    And BTW, other good alternatives are Yep and Leap.
     

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