Looking for an up-to-date guide on installing Windows XP

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by Saladsamurai, Dec 8, 2009.

  1. Saladsamurai macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    #1
    Hi there folks! :)

    I have been searching around the forum in the hopes of finding a sticky of this sort, but no luck yet. Google is returning a lot of results, but the dates are mostly circa 2006.

    I have recently upgraded to OS X 10.5.8

    I am looking to install Windows XP Professional and was hoping to find a step by step guide to the install including what kind of XP disc I need.

    From what I gather, I need a 'full retail' version. After some searching, I found that this 'full' version retails in a lot of places for about $250. I don't mind shelling out the money, but is this really the best price?

    Anyone have any luck finding a good price on XP pro from a 'not-shady' seller?

    Thanks for any input :)
     
  2. Saladsamurai thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    #2
    Any thoughts? I am doing my final searching online now as I would like to be installing this by the weekend. I was just hoping to get some input from people who have already done this. Thanks!
     
  3. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #3
    May I ask, why XP? If it is just compatibility, you might be better off using XP Mode under Windows 7 Professional since you are essentially going to be paying the same $ for 7 than XP.

    I was going to suggest exercising downgrade rights, but apparently retail licenses don't get them.

    The blow-by-blow is in the Boot Camp Instruction manual http://manuals.info.apple.com/en/boot_camp_install-setup.pdf and hasn't changed because both XP and Boot Camp 2.x are just old.

    B
     
  4. Saladsamurai thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    #4
    Thanks for the reply balamw :)

    As for 'why xp' it is just because I am used to it. I never got into Vista and thus have only used XP. And I'm not so sure about the pricing. A quick search turned up Win XP Pro = $250 and 7 Ultimate = $320.

    Seems like XP is relatively cheap?


    Also, what about OEMs? I realize that they are quite restricted regarding licensing, but if I only ever plan on installing it on 1 computer, is that a viable option? Newegg has Windows 7 Ultimate OEM for $190.

    Does Boot camp support an install from OEM?

    And I found this. Would this work? Or is it a scam?
     
  5. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #5
    NewEgg has 7 Pro retail for $275 which is close enough to $250. (I'm assuming you need something in Pro (domain access? VPN? remote desktop services?) otherwise you should consider the mainstream Home Premium for $185 full retail. IMHO there really is nothing MOST users would ever need in Ultimate, so save your $70 unless you need BitLocker or Multi-Language operation things which you would not get in XP Pro either.).

    With Windows Anytime Upgrades, you can go up a version if and when you have to.

    OEM/SBE will work, but it is not licensed for end users, only for system builders for resale to third-party end users, so you are essentially in the same licensing boat as someone who buys OS X for install on a non-Apple PC.

    B
     
  6. Saladsamurai thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    #6

    Ok! This all great info. Thanks for your time :) You are right, I should probably go with the Home edition. I initially was thinking about Remote Desktop services, but it just occurred to me that I am building a new PC in 2010, so I should probably let that be my host since it ill run faster.

    I think this would be a great opportunity for me to experiment with Windows 7 Home edition. That way when I build my PC, I will at least have that option well weighed.

    Thanks again,
    Casey
     
  7. Saladsamurai thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    #7
    Actually, while I have you here: do you know if the Home edition of 7 is available in both 32 and 64 bit? If so, do you recommend one over the other for install with Boot camp?
     
  8. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #8
    Retail versions (both full and upgrade) come with separate discs for both versions in one box. You can even switch between them by reinstalling.

    You didn't say which Mac you were installing this on, so I can't really say which version is most appropriate. In general if your Mac has (or can have) more than 4 GB of RAM go with 64 bit, 2 GB stick with 32 bit. 4 GB depends on the specific Mac.

    NOTE: You can upgrade from Home Premium to Professional anytime for $89. http://store.microsoft.com/microsof...-6FCD-DE11-974B-0019B9C043EB&mr:referralID=NA

    B
     
  9. Saladsamurai thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    #9
    I see. I have a late 2008 (i think) with the 2.33 Ghz processor (Intel). The manufacturer spec is a maximum of 3 GB RAM.

    After some searching, I decided to install the 4 GB anyway. The Mac recognizes it all, but I have yet to really see any performance increase.

    But then again, I am only basing this on little thinks like startup time and then amount of time it takes to open up an app like Excel or something.

    Now that I am a (very) little bit more knowledgeable about computers, I believe that this might not be a fair way to evaluate whether my system is running faster or not since the upgrade.

    I would probably have to do something more computationally strenuous on the system to really test it.

    Any thoughts on the matter?

    Thanks again :) You have been very helpful.

    Casey
     
  10. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #10
    Usually the RAM above 2GB only really comes into play when you do something memory intensive like have many applications open at the same time or edit video or large photographs. No need to benchmark it if the system is fast enough for your needs.

    Doesn't sound like you stress the system too much, so stick with 32 bit for now. You can always reinstall 64 bit if you have a reason to.

    B
     
  11. Saladsamurai thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
  12. ahm macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2009
    #12
    uhh... to answer your original question, installation is pretty much the same as always. You put the disc in, set up the partitions and follow the instructions. With Boot Camp telling you how to do it, it's even easier. If the 10000 page Boot Camp "manual" isn't good enough, search around on google for information on dual booting. It can be intimidating the first time I guess if you didn't back anything up, otherwise it's just a computer. You won't break it or anything.
     

Share This Page