Looking for TV tuner/DVR solution

Discussion in 'Apple TV and Home Theater' started by spectre51, Feb 7, 2009.

  1. spectre51 macrumors 6502

    spectre51

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    #1
    Okay so I am sick of our cable companies DVR. I am thinking of getting a tv tuner for my iMac and using it as the DVR then streaming the tv shows to my AppleTV.

    I am lookng for a couple things one it must support clear QAM for HD shows, and I am also hoping I can find one that has multiple tuners so I can record more than one show at the same time.

    I know about the Elgato tuners but don't know if they support multiple recordings. Also is the 250 from elgato just the hybrid with built in encoder or does it do more than just that?

    Anyone have any other suggestions for tuners? Remember I have an iMac so no internal cards.
     
  2. spacecadet610 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    #2
    hdhomerun and eyetv works great for me and satisfies your requirements
     
  3. spectre51 thread starter macrumors 6502

    spectre51

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    #3
    Okay was looking at the site and stuff for it. Question real quick. I'm not up on the whole NTSC/ATSC/clear QAM stuff so excuse my ignorance.

    With my cable subscription (Time Warner) If I plug the cable line into the HD Homerun into both jacks on the HDHR I should be able to get the normal cable stations as well as the local HD stations correct?

    I kept reading how the HDHR doesn't support NTSC so does that include my non HD cable stations or is all the cable stations not analog?

    How was your setup with the HDHR and EyeTV? Pretty simple to get setup and working. I'm not looking to watch TV through the EyeTV software just use it to setup recordings and download then I will encode for the AppleTV
     
  4. sab46 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    #4
    I don't own an HDhomerun so take this with a grain of salt.
    The HDHR can only tune digital stations - QAM (cable) or ATSC (over the air). If you plug cable into the HDHR, it will get any digital stations that the cable system broadcasts. I don't know if all cable companies broadcast digital signals, but most do.
    Note: These digital channels over cable are not the same as digital cable. You're only going to get the basic network/local/pbs stations. Stations like ESPN may be broadcast digitally, but will be encrypted and unusable by the HDHR.
    2nd Note: All HDTV stations are digital, but not al digital stations are in HD. So some of the stations you may get using the HDHR will be digital but not in HD.

    Most people that get a HDHR also get an analog TV tuner (non-HD) to get the rest of the stations if they have more than basic cable.

    Good luck.
     
  5. spectre51 thread starter macrumors 6502

    spectre51

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    #5
    So there is no way of knowing if my cable company is broadcasting the regular stations in analog or digital? ( I doubt their customer service would even know this)
     
  6. jaw04005 macrumors 601

    jaw04005

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    AR
    #6
    The FCC requires cable companies to broadcast local stations digitally without encryption (in the clear) if they also carry the analog signals (which practically all do).

    I suggest you read up on QAM tuners.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QAM_tuner

    FCC Sec. 76.630 and CFR Title 47, §76.901

    If they are encrypting your local stations, you can file a complaint at

    http://esupport.fcc.gov/complaints.htm
     
  7. spacecadet610 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    #7
    yeah all cable companies should have qam HDTV channels for free. i've had success with charter and comcast. check out my sig for tips on how to check what channels might be available. hdhomerun won't tune the regular ntsc channels, but eyetv will allow a 3rd (in addition to the 2 that hdhomerun offers) usb tuner for analog tv (i.e. eyetv hybrid).
     
  8. spectre51 thread starter macrumors 6502

    spectre51

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    #8
    I know they carry the local stations (FOX, NBC, CBS) unencrypted but I am wondering about the other basic cable channels (FX, TBS, Spike) Guess I could give it a whirl and get a analog usb tuner later if I don't get all the channels.

    Anyone know of any dual tuners that also support analog?
     
  9. almostinsane macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    #9
    That's not true at all and is just some internet myth. All the cable companies have to do is provide you with a means to access the content on their system if they do choose to encrypt it. This is a cable card or cable box. There is no FCC mandate that says they cannot encrypt local stations.

    There are current a few carriers who are encrypting everything.
     
  10. spacecadet610 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    #10
    FWIW, I haven't been able to get very many non-basic channels
     
  11. Tilpots macrumors 601

    Tilpots

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Carolina Beach, NC
    #11
    wrong. From wiki:

     
  12. almostinsane macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    #12
    ugg, Wikipedia. Not facts.

    STATEMENT OF
    CHAIRMAN KEVIN J. MARTIN
    In the Matter of Carriage of Digital Television Broadcast Signals: Amendment to Part 76 of the
    Commission’s Rules

    Importantly, in the item we adopt today, we do not dictate how cable operators must fulfill their statutory requirement to make all broadcast signals viewable to its subscribers. Rather, we give them a choice. Accordingly, the Commission is not forcing consumers to purchase or lease a set top box to
    continue watching their favorite channels. This decision lies in the hands of the cable company. They can avoid the need for new boxes by choosing to downconvert the digital signal into analog at their headend. This downconversion would permit analog cable subscribers to continue watching broadcast television just as they do today without disruption. Of course, to the extent that a cable system is all- digital, like DBS systems are, all consumers are given a box that allows them to watch all of the broadcast stations.


    PDF info:


    http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-07-170A1.pdf


    We also proposed that the cost of any down conversion rendered necessary by these rules be borne by the
    cable operators.41

    18. We adopt these proposals, and note that they apply to all operators, regardless of their rate- regulated status.42 In sum, cable operators must comply with the statutory mandate that must-carry broadcast signals “shall be viewable via cable on all television receivers of a subscriber which are connected to a cable system by a cable operator or for which a cable operator provides a connection,” and they have two options of doing so.43 First, to the extent that such subscribers do not have the capability of viewing digital signals, cable systems must carry the signals of commercial and non-commercial must- carry stations in analog format to those subscribers, after downconverting the signals from their original digital format at the headend.44 This proposal is in line with the approach already voluntarily planned by many cable operators, as described in testimony byTime Warner CEO Glenn Britt before the House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet.4

    To fulfill its must-carry obligations in cases where a cable operator uses digital-to-analog converter boxes that do not have analog tuners, the operator can deliver a standard definition digital version of a must-carry broadcaster’s high definition digital signal, in addition to the analog and high definition signal, or use boxes that convert high definition signals for viewing on an analog television set, or use other technical solutions so long as cable subscribers have the ability to view the signals.


    17. In the Second Further Notice, we sought comment on proposals that would ensure the viewability, for all subscribers, of signals carried pursuant to mandatory carriage. To that end, we proposed that cable operators must either: (1) carry the signals of commercial and non-commercial must-carry stations in analog format to all analog cable subscribers, or (2) for all-digital systems, carry those signals only in digital format, provided that all subscribers with analog television sets have the necessary equipment to view the broadcast content.40

    f a cable operator authorizes subscribers to install Additional receiver connections, but does not provide the subscriber with such connections, or with the equipment and materials for such connections, the operator [is only required to] notify such subscribers of all broadcast stations carried on the cable system which cannot be viewed without a converter box and . . . offer to sell or lease such a converter box to such subscribers at rates in accordance with section
    623(b)(3).”59
     
  13. hotrod54chevy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2009
    #13
    that's the interesting thing about wikipedia...anyone can edit it...i mean,it's on the internets,it MUST be true,right?:p
     
  14. Tilpots macrumors 601

    Tilpots

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Carolina Beach, NC
    #14


    So you're saying they encrypt it but are forced to give you a box that unencrypts which then means you get it sans encryption?:rolleyes:
     
  15. almostinsane macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    #15
    No, what the FCC says is if they choose to encrypt their content then they must offer you a way to decrypt it, either a cablecard or a box. They do not have to give this to you for free.
     

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