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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
64,104
31,782


The first M4 iPad Pro bend tests are in, and the initial consensus appears to be that Apple has managed to make its thinnest device ever just as durable as the previous generation M2 iPad Pro that it replaces.

bend-test-ipad-pro-1.jpg

Two approaches were taken in bend tests by prominent tech YouTubers. JerryRigEverything for example forcibly applied pressure by bending the new device with his hands, while MobileReviewsEh took a different tack by placing the iPad under a force meter and applying gym weights on top to exert pressure within a limited contact area.

When bending the iPad Pro from the back in the horizontal position, JerryRigEverything found that the device held up "surprisingly well," as if "suspicious levels of black magic structural integrity" were going on.

When forcibly bent from the back, the glass screen eventually rippled away from the frame, yet the display and operating system continued to function normally. When it came to putting pressure on the device vertically, however, it was a different story, and the iPad Pro quickly suffered a catastrophic split up the middle, originating from the USB-C port.


JerryRigEverything then removed the display to reveal and remove the internals, including the new metal cowling that runs down the middle of the device. "If Apple could add another more perpendicular spine running width-wise near the charging port, this thing probably would have survived," he added.


JerryRigEverything concluded that the central spine of the new iPad Pro is "definitely providing enough structure for horizontal bends," and should stand up to everyday use in a backpack or luggage. In his own AppleTrack test, Sam Kohl agreed: "Is [its thinness] a durability risk? The answer is no. The spine that Apple put along the logic board is very good unless you are bending the corners in."


After placing in excess of 70 pounds of weight on the center of the iPad Pro display until complete structural failure, MobileReviewsEh concluded that the new iPad Pro is "just as tough if not a little bit tougher" than the one it replaces, despite being 18-20% thinner than the M2 iPad Pro.

All in all, another "bendgate" looks unlikely. For those unfamiliar with the controversy, Apple in 2019 admitted to shipping its then-new models with a "very slight bend in the aluminum chassis," which it blamed on a "side effect of the manufacturing process."

Despite videos indicating that the 2018 iPad Pro models bent more easily than other models, Apple said the bend did not worsen over time or negatively affect the iPad's performance, and that concerns over the device's durability were unfounded. Nevertheless, some iPad owners were understandably upset to find defects in devices that cost hundreds of dollars.

Article Link: M4 iPad Pro Bend Tests: Durability Equal to M2 Model Despite Thinness
 

gnipgnop

macrumors 68020
Feb 18, 2009
2,239
3,069
They always have to do three-point bends...force in middle + force on each end in the opposite direction.. in order to cause damage. The reality is that three points bends are highly unlikely to ever happen in real world use. It's not going to happen in a backpack or on the couch.
 

maverick808

macrumors 65816
Jun 30, 2004
1,144
154
Scotland
Looks like horizontal strength is great, but the first video shows it broke easily vertically, and in the second whilst he was trying to apply horizontal pressure it actually broke vertically. I think we'll see a lot of folk breaking these vertically and near that charging port.
 

DMG35

Contributor
May 27, 2021
2,317
7,327
I used to really like the JerryRigEverything YouTube channel. But man has Zach's head gotten big. He comes across so smug and his "I know so much more than you about everything" attitude is unbearable for me to sit through now.
 
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gco212

macrumors 6502a
Jul 21, 2004
546
187
Philadelphia
They always have to do three-point bends...force in middle + force on each end in the opposite direction.. in order to cause damage. The reality is that three points bends are highly unlikely to ever happen in real world use. It's not going to happen in a backpack or on the couch.

It needs to be able to handle repeated tosses in a backpack to the floor and a few accidental times I've sat on it for a second when it was on the couch. That's about all I want to see.
 

jarman92

macrumors 68000
Nov 13, 2014
1,506
4,682
Two approaches were taken in bend tests by prominent tech YouTubers. JerryRigEverything for example forcibly applied pressure by bending the new device with his hands, while MobileReviewsEh took a different tack by placing the iPad under a force meter and applying gym weights on top to exert pressure within a limited contact area.

Wow, someone actually used science and reliable methods instead of clickbait BS like JerryRigEverything.
 

Bogstandard

macrumors regular
Aug 24, 2018
196
220
Mid West
This is irrelevant BS to me.
I am concerned that the company is inspiring this bending tat to distract from the reduced battery size.
I remain a sceptic regarding the touted increased efficiency being able to maintain battery stamina vs smaller battery and more complex power hungry apps.
I personally have observed reduced battery life/stamina with each successive iPad generation that I have owned.

I'm looking forward to battery stamina tests by grown ups, as opposed to pointless expensive wasteful tests by destructives.

I have to admit though, that Monty is a cool Canine.
 

HobeSoundDarryl

macrumors G5
YouTubers that made bend tests popular are a cancer to society

There's whole entities that crash many brand new cars every day to apparently gauge the safety of passengers in collisions.


Shame on them. Let them pesky humans die in car crashes. Why waste some perfectly good cars or tablets in pursuit of some kind of consumer benefit analysis? What's important is company products & profit! /s*

Besides, when it comes to Apple stuff, if anything at all goes wrong, it has to be the users fault, cheap Chinese chargers, someone else's ancillary product, etc. Apple cannot make any mistakes. /s*

IMO: if they purchased these devices to use them in this way, that's THEIR business. Once purchased, Apple no longer owns them. Anyone should do with their owned things whatever they want to do with them... as long as they don't harm others.

*middle 2 paragraphs are sacarsam in case some of us are not getting it.
 
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andonemorething

macrumors member
Sep 3, 2022
54
29
There's whole entities that crash many brand new cars every day to apparently gauge the safety of passengers in collisions. Shame on them. Let them pesky humans die in car crashes.

Why waste some perfectly good cars or tablets in pursuit of some kind of consumer benefit analysis? What's important is company products & profit! ;)

Beat me to it. Lol these comments are so stupid. I'm so glad so many people can save their precious money by making informed choices thanks to these folks but noooooo, let's feel bad for the trillion dollar corporation.
 

Unregistered 4U

macrumors G4
Jul 22, 2002
10,257
8,250
They always have to do three-point bends...force in middle + force on each end in the opposite direction.. in order to cause damage. The reality is that three points bends are highly unlikely to ever happen in real world use. It's not going to happen in a backpack or on the couch.
To do it PROPER, to do it for SCIENCE, they shouldn’t do all the deformations on a single iPad. They should start with a new one each time. Since all the stresses are compounded, by the time they finally got it to bend, it’s due to already being weakened.
 
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