Mac and Computer Science

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by BigMacUBC, Sep 3, 2010.

  1. BigMacUBC macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    #1
    Hi guys.

    I'm about to start my computer science major and was wondering if my current MacBook pro would be sufficient. I currently have the 13 inch 2.4 GHz MacBook pro. The thing is I have no idea what programs I will be using. Also what specs should I aim for if I do decide to replace my current laptop. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. TEG macrumors 604

    TEG

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Location:
    Langley, Washington
    #2
    Nearly any Mac will work, since most CS programs utilize Unix and Linux to teach you about programming. OS X is based on Unix, so programming in JAVA, C, and C++ will work with no issue. C# will require installation of Windows, and Objective C/Cocoa, will work with just XCode in OS X.

    I would recommend a MacBook Pro, simply so the machine will still be relatively new by the time you are done with school.

    TEG
     
  3. bigjobby macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Location:
    London, UK
    #3
    I don't think there's any need to replace your current MBP. A 15" would be nice for the extra real estate but that's about it really. You shouldn't have a problem with the 13" lasting you through your course IMO.

    Do consider a good backup device if you haven't already got one.
     
  4. BigMacUBC thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    #4
    Thanks for all the help everyone!

    Just curious is the backup device just incase my MacBook pro has issues?
     
  5. bigjobby macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Location:
    London, UK
    #5
    Any hard drives regardless of brand and age of unit can fail. Its a very good idea to have a backup strategy in the event of a hard drive failure and could also be a good archiving solution should you need to release some space from your local machine. Carrying alot of data solely on one machine is a huge risk especially on a laptop and getting into a routine of backing up is best practice.

    Best be safe than sorry I'd say.
     

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