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acader

macrumors regular
Jun 19, 2018
141
166
West
I try to follow a simple rule for all software. If it is made in China/Taiwan/Far East, ignore it. Software is a black box, which savvy users also cannot figure the internals. If I am not mistaken, there was a mobile phone using Android software that was pinging servers in China every 24 hours. Android itself had nothing to do with it, but the pinging software was a layer that was sitting on top of the OS.
 
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BuddyTronic

macrumors 68000
Jul 11, 2008
1,879
1,481
Why does it always have to be a server in China?

Yah Exactly, shouldn't we be pinning it on Russia? lol!


It isn't China - it's California disguised as a Chinese IP address. Convenient to do it that way :)

No questions asked after that - it's either "China" or "Russia" - then we don't have to do any thinking, and that's a *good thing*
 
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1050792

Suspended
Oct 2, 2016
2,515
3,991
You clearly have no idea of how businesses work nor how the Mac App Store works. The $1.50 that Apple receives is not pure profit, there are card processing fees, hosting and other expenses to be taken out of Apple's cut. Their profit is less than you might think.
That sadness me as Apple's not making enough profit they barely can't keep the company running.
 
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JosephAW

macrumors 603
May 14, 2012
6,123
8,203
Why does it always have to be a server in China?
Not always. I used to use a clock app on my iPhone and my router kept reporting traffic to a Middle East country and I discover it was the clock app. Who knows what it was transmitting. Deleted it and problem solved.
 

Naraxus

macrumors 68020
Oct 13, 2016
2,156
8,715
I think the last app I got from the MAS was Star Wars:KOTOR.

Unlike the iOS version, the Mac App Store is pretty useless
 
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FrenchRoasted

macrumors regular
Sep 21, 2016
215
1,196
It's a Mac app, not an iOS app. There are tools that give performance metrics about disk and network activity, but how would the OS possibly monitor what Apps are doing at the file level? The system would be useless if the OS was constantly doing that level of monitoring, not to mention the OS has no concept of context, i.e. it doesn't know if files contain sensitive data or not.

Ultimately, Apple can only do so much to vet Apps in the App Store, Mac or iOS. Apple doesn't have the source code for each app, and that's the only way they can *really* discover everything the app is doing. Even if they did have source code, they couldn't possibly review every app (and every update to the app) simply because of the time and effort involved (think in terms of many months and many hundreds of skilled staff).
You can tell I'm not a coder, thanks for the info.
 

Labyrintho

macrumors newbie
Aug 21, 2017
25
29
We should be wary of a rush to judgment here.

I think we are forgetting China's legitimate need to blackmail or spear-phish selected Americans into providing them with critically important classified information.
 
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barthrh

macrumors member
Jan 11, 2005
58
38
You clearly have no idea of how businesses work nor how the Mac App Store works. The $1.50 that Apple receives is not pure profit, there are card processing fees, hosting and other expenses to be taken out of Apple's cut. Their profit is less than you might think.

Not to mention that the true golden goose is being a trusted source for applications that don't steal data or otherwise compromise your system. That, along with licensing across all of your Macs, is the real value proposition of the App Store.
 
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VulchR

macrumors 68040
Jun 8, 2009
3,444
14,349
Scotland
Apple wants consumers to pay higher prices because of the secure premium experience of macOS and iOS. Well, OK then, but: (1) Why wasn't this caught at the level of the App Store when the app was submitted? and (2) Why didn't macOS's security features flag suspicious activity?
 

macintoshmac

Suspended
May 13, 2010
6,089
6,992
Funny, I wondered why they only took the browser histories then...

Maybe they were able to utilise a loophole in app access to Safari. Apple will obviously now inspect and plug this, making it a teeny tiny bit more secure. Baby steps. :p

On a more serious note, ad blockers and trackers can read pages, browser data and other things. Very few are there who do not and claim so.

Wipr is one. I use it, and it just works.
 

BuddyTronic

macrumors 68000
Jul 11, 2008
1,879
1,481
First, Chinese companies started investing in US companies, then owning real estate (some iconic structures in the USA are owned by Chinese conglomerates), next they bought car companies, now it is data. With data, they can theoretically own the people. The End.


Or it could be Mark Zuckerberg! :) Make it look like China or whoever, but if you follow the trail, it ends with Mark Zuckerberg I bet :). Just as much reason to believe that, wouldn't you say? I mean nobody needs any proof - so pick a theory, any theory.
 
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needsomecoffee

macrumors 6502
May 6, 2008
471
1,051
Seattle
Love the 5-star stats. App has over 10x the number of review rankings vs. all the other top apps - nearly every one 5-stars. Surely no one is capable of review Apple's ranking/review system.
 

brofkand

macrumors 68000
Jun 11, 2006
1,638
4,332
There's big money in these types of apps. Many Windows switchers buy them because they never learned proper internet hygiene and are trained to think they're needed. Even Mac Rumors did a story on Mac Cleaner the other day because they get a spiff. Apple stores sold antivirus software on their shelves for years.

Mac Cleaner may or may not send your data to China like this one does, but it's still a useless app that's a waste of money.
 
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TheBearman

macrumors 6502
May 23, 2008
445
87
Cary, NC
If this is available on the European App Store Apple and the developer may find themselves is violation of GDPR compliance. The fines for which are crippling to say the least.
 

FCX

macrumors member
Jul 15, 2016
98
224
"Adware Doctor is also currently the number five top paid app on the entire store in the U.S."

Why would they kill the golden goose? They get paid $1.50 every time someone downloads it, which is pure profit.
Peanuts compared to the loss of trust. Kill it, or lose all credibility.
 
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