Mac Classic Questions

Discussion in 'Apple Collectors' started by DrakkyAures, Aug 19, 2014.

  1. DrakkyAures macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2014
    #1
    I recently acquired a Macintosh Classic which is in quite good condition, but had a few questions concerning it. (FYI, I have the original System 6.0.7. Startup and System Additions floppies.)

    1) When I first boot it up, and I have the Startup disk in the drive, it just sits on the grey screen with a movable cursor. However, if I do the Command+Shift+Option+Delete key combo it goes to the Happy Mac and continues to the desktop as normal. I was wondering if there's a reason it doesn't automatically go to the Happy Mac even though it's the original startup disk? My guess is that it might not have a hard disk installed in it? I do have a T-15 coming sometime soon so I can open the case and check if that is the issue.

    2) I wasn't sure how to even install the HDD in the first place? From what I gathered, I need a 50 pin SCSI drive (which I have a working/compatible spare that I got recently, just not installed in anything) and a Disk Tools floppy (which I can't find the disk image for online?) and I'm not sure what else to do?

    3) If there's a way to format a PC floppy (WinXP) to my Mac's format using software or otherwise.
     
  2. MacTech68 macrumors 68000

    MacTech68

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2008
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #2
    If it is labeled on the front as a "Mac Classic", try powering it on without a floppy in the floppy drive. Leave it for as long as it takes to either boot, OR until you see a floppy icon with a question mark in the middle of the screen.

    If the PRAM battery is flat, or the PRAM has been reset to defaults, it will count down from SCSI ID 6 to zero, looking for a SCSI hard drive to boot from. It should eventually boot or give you the floppy icon with the question mark, but it may take some time.

    There may already be an internal HD that has failed or is suffering from 'stiction'.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stiction#Hard_disk_drives
     
  3. David Schmidt macrumors 6502

    David Schmidt

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Location:
    Southeastern USA
    #3
    It's not set up to automatically go to the MacOS in ROM (hence the fancy key sequence to get there). As MacTech68 noted, your real hard disk is either missing or stuck.

    You unscrew the old one, and screw the new one in. There's not a lot more to it than that. You will need a patched version of the HD tools app that will "see" disks other than the Apple blessed ones, unless you have a third-party formatter. Now, if you want to install the OS on the disk, if the built-in MacOS can see the new hard drive once you've formatted it, you could potentially drag/drop the system folder from the internal OS to the new hard drive, and boot from that. Otherwise, you get to make boot floppies:
    http://download.info.apple.com/Appl...System_6.0.x/SSW_6.0.8-1.4MB_Disk1of2.sea.bin
    http://download.info.apple.com/Appl...System_6.0.x/SSW_6.0.8-1.4MB_Disk2of2.sea.bin
    This will be complicated by the fact that you need a Mac to unpack the sea files. http://rescuemyclassicmac.com/ will sell you pre-made floppy disks.

    There are ways since you can use HD disks; I'm not familiar enough to help with them, though. It's infinitely simpler to have another Mac to do that job.
     
  4. DrakkyAures thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Aug 19, 2014
    #4
    Ok, I did that, and it took awhile, but it finally reached the screen with the question mark. Also I kept hearing something spinning up and then I hear a single beep. Then the process repeats again. So would it be safe to bet it's either a lack of HDD or a stuck one?
     
  5. David Schmidt macrumors 6502

    David Schmidt

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    Aug 22, 2006
    Location:
    Southeastern USA
    #5
    A variation on Click of Death. The drive is dead.
     
  6. DrakkyAures thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Aug 19, 2014
    #6
    Ahh, so that's what it is. I'll have to take the one out of the other Mac then and install it. So all that really is, is unscrewing the old one and screwing the new one in?
     
  7. David Schmidt macrumors 6502

    David Schmidt

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Location:
    Southeastern USA
    #7
    Well, I'm making some assumptions about your experience, and so I left out some details. Here's what you'll actually have to do:

    1. Dismantle the case. You'll need that long Torx screwdriver to get the screws out; you may need a case spreader (a handy little tool) or some elbow grease to get the case halves split.
    2. Get the old drive out of the drive cage. That'll involve unscrewing the drive from the side rails, and unplugging the 50-pin SCSI cable as well as the power plug. You may have to use some ingenuity in getting at all the parts and cables, and you'll have to do that while being very careful to avoid the picture tube - it has a nasty charge stored up that will knock your socks off if you touch it. Observe the electrician rule here - keep one hand in your pocket.
    3. Get the new drive out of the other machine, and reverse steps 2 and 1.

    If any of this is a surprise to you - this might not be the job for you. You may want to seek local help.
     
  8. DrakkyAures thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Aug 19, 2014
    #8
    So what specifically part-wise about the picture tube should I avoid?
     
  9. MacTech68 macrumors 68000

    MacTech68

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2008
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #9
    The black cap on the side of the tube with the red cable coming out of it. DO NOT attempt to lift the cap or probe it with anything. It is clipped into the tube, so it will resist, but there can be a nasty charge underneath, even when the machine is powered off.

    Another part of the tube to be careful of is the circuit board that is plugged onto the back of the tube. Take great care NOT to knock it when working/pulling cables, as this can break the nipple off the tube, allowing air to enter, rendering the tube useless. The inside of the tube is essentially a vacuum, which allows electrons to flow from the guns to the front of the tube, producing a picture.

    Of course, you will do all this with the power removed completely to avoid dangerous "mistakes".
     
  10. DrakkyAures thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2014
    #10
    I'm happy to report that I got the working HDD into the Mac with no trouble at all, and it booted instantly from it and the icon is showing up on the desktop. :D

    Thank you both again for your help.
     
  11. MacTech68 macrumors 68000

    MacTech68

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2008
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #11
    Well done. :)

    Enjoy!
     

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