Mac desktop advice

Discussion in 'iMac' started by jquest68, Sep 1, 2016.

  1. jquest68 macrumors member

    jquest68

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2016
    Location:
    Georgia
    #1
    Hello gang,
    I'm planning on buying a Mac 27in Desktop for school and for creating cartoons and graphics. I don't know if buying one now is right, I don't know if Apple is coming out with a new one this Conference or is it safe to buy one now? Plus I was reading a post of the fusion drives. I don't know whats that but if I don't pick that choice then I'm getting 256GB flash storage. I don't know whats best.
    I was approved for $2000 so I can't really go all out on buying stuff on the Mac that I don't really need. Can someone help me? Thanks.
     
  2. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    #2
    But the iMac with the 1TB hard drive.

    Buy a 500GB Samsung 850 EVO for $160 and put it in your iMac.

    It's even cheaper that the iMac with 256GB SSD from Apple and you get twice the storage.
     
  3. vapourtrails macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2016
    #3
    Opening up a brand new iMac is not a task for the faint of heart. While it might be cheaper damaging the iMac could prove costly.
     
  4. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    #4
    It's not exactly difficult to follow the very detailed instructions.
     
  5. vapourtrails macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2016
    #5
    Have you done it? What about reapplying the adhesive? I think most people would not want to do this.
     
  6. Deane2000 macrumors member

    Deane2000

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2014
    Location:
    Southern California
    #6
    There is never a "right" time to buy. If you get a new Mac when it first comes out and pay top dollar, you know it will become outdated at
    some point. Wait and the clock is ticking on the release on a new model that will make you feel like you've bought yesterdays news. What is the solution?

    Buying a Mac is like choosing to go swimming. You're either going to go swimming or your not. If you choose to go, well, you have to just jump right in.
    A whatever point you feel it's time to make a purchase, choose the best model to meet you needs and jump right in. I would check the refurbs on Apple's site if you're looking to maximize the value of your purchase. They have some good deals for what is essentially a brand new computer.

    Good luck!
     
  7. jquest68 thread starter macrumors member

    jquest68

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2016
    Location:
    Georgia
    #7
    Thank you guys.
    Now another question; I saw some refurbished models I was thinking of getting instead but wasn't sure if I was getting yester-years model. How can I tell? would it be the 4K or 5K retina that I'm looking at? I'm new to understanding Mac even though I still have my Mac Classic from when they first came out
     
  8. IngerMan macrumors 6502a

    IngerMan

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Location:
    Michigan
    #8
    They tell you the release date of the iMac. The current model was October 2015 release. Then early 2015 was the one prior.
     
  9. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    #9
    Yes, we have.

    We have the Late 2013 and considered upgrading to the Late 2015, but decided to upgrade our current units with SSDs instead.
     
  10. Glockworkorange macrumors regular

    Glockworkorange

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2015
    Location:
    Chicago, Illinois
    #10
    All 5K retina iMac's are 27 inches. The 4K models are 21 inches. 5K started in 2014 and the 4K was introduced in 2015.
     
  11. agustinbg macrumors member

    agustinbg

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    #11
    If the guy knows how to do it and doesn't care about voiding the warranty; it's a good idea.
     
  12. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    #12
    Upgrading the hard drive doesn't void the warranty (assuming that he/she didn't break anything).

    Here's a video:
     
  13. IHelpId10t5 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2014
    #13
    Yep. And as an illustrator doing cartoons and graphics, the 5K display will be simply stunning when you see it! Even the smallest text is legible and buttery smooth! I've used many displays over the years including Apple 4K, Dell UHD, etc, and the 27" iMac 5K blows them out of the water. I didn't think that I would ever say this but if I had to choose between two 4K UHD monitors or a single 5K iMac I would take the iMac. The latest iMac 27" models are worth every penny. I've got one at home with a 3GB fusion drive and one at work with 512 SSD and both have exceptional performance so far.
     
  14. agustinbg macrumors member

    agustinbg

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    #14
    I don't know, man; according to Apple's warranty; it might void your warranty. Probably in real life, they aren't so strict buy if they wanted to void your warranty, they could.

    • This Warranty does not apply: (a) to consumable parts, such as batteries or protective coatings that are designed to diminish over time, unless failure has occurred due to a defect in materials or workmanship; (b) to cosmetic damage, including but not limited to scratches, dents and broken plastic on ports unless failure has occurred due to a defect in materials or workmanship; (c) to damage caused by use with a third party component or product that does not meet the Apple Product’s specifications (Apple Product specifications are available at www.apple.com under the technical specifications for each product and also available in stores); (d) to damage caused by accident, abuse, misuse, fire, liquid contact, earthquake or other external cause; (e) to damage caused by operating the Apple Product outside Apple’s published guidelines; (f) to damage caused by service (including upgrades and expansions) performed by anyone who is not a representative of Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider (“AASP”); (g) to an Apple Product that has been modified to alter functionality or capability without the written permission of Apple; (h) to defects caused by normal wear and tear or otherwise due to the normal aging of the Apple Product; (i) if any serial number has been removed or defaced from the Apple Product; or (j) if Apple receives information from relevant public authorities that the product has been stolen or if you are unable to deactivate passcode-enabled or other security measures designed to prevent unauthorized access to the Apple Product, and you cannot prove in any way that you are the authorized user of the product (eg. by presenting proof of purchase).
     
  15. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    #15
    In order to void the warranty, Apple has to prove that whatever you did caused the product to fail (i.e. improper installation, etc.).

    In a Consumer Alert issued by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the agency confirmed that “The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act makes it illegal for companies to void your warranty or deny coverage under the warranty simply because you used an aftermarket part.”
     
  16. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #16
    Is it worth the risk of damaging a very expensive computer? Personally, I'm of the opinion that its not - just my $.02
     
  17. tkwolf macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2012
    #17
    I've watched countless videos on it and the adhesive part is what scares me. This is why i have not attempted to replace the drive yet lol
     
  18. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    #18
    Cutting the adhesive is probably the least scary part.

    iFixit has even released an iMac Opening Wheel that makes it easy. It's literally like cutting a pizza!

    [​IMG]

    And here's the video to reapply the display.



    And here's the in-line Digital Thermometer to control the fans.
    https://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/DIDIMACHDD12/
     
  19. Fishrrman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #19
    Mike wrote above in post 16:
    "Is it worth the risk of damaging a very expensive computer? Personally, I'm of the opinion that its not - just my $.02"

    Words of wisdom here, worth more than just two cents.

    I would NOT advise an end-user to break open a new iMac that he/she just spent big bucks for, to install an SSD internally.

    You WILL void your warranty.
    And if you break something, Apple probably won't help unless you're willing to pay.

    Do you want to take this risk?
    Or, as Clint Eastwood would say... "well, kid... do you feel lucky?"

    As an alternative, I'd plug in an external SSD via USB3, and boot and run that way, at least until the warranty had expired...
     
  20. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    #20
    Installing an SSD does NOT void the warranty unless it can be determine that you installing the SSD caused computer to stopped working.

    Obviously, if you break something, then Apple won't be responsible.

    Common sense 101.
     
  21. AlexGraphicD macrumors regular

    AlexGraphicD

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Location:
    New York
    #21
    What about the dust that is going to get inside the parts and the body when you open the Mac? Is this of any concern? It seems very easy to open the Mac and it probably won't void the warranty but I'm really curious about the dust in the air how it is going to affect the process after it is completed.
     
  22. Floris macrumors 68020

    Floris

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Location:
    Netherlands
    #22
    The dust struggle is real. Even if you bring it to unofficial resellers who do it for 25 to 75 bucks, .. they should know better, have the experience, and know how to clean a room. Even THEN there are people I know that had to go back a couple of times just to get the ridiculous amount of dust cleared as reApplying the screen caused it to suck it back in behind it. Static and big surface and dust in the air = dust behind the screen. Sometimes it's pretty bad
     
  23. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    #23
    The iMac has a fan that intake air from the surrounding. There is already plenty of dust inside. I highly doubt that removing the screen is going to add any more.

    I. I don't know what you mean by "know better". There are plenty of instructions available.

    II. Most places don't have "clean rooms" unless they are semiconductor fabrication plants.

    III. On the Slim Unibody iMac, the screen is fused to the glass so that is no way dust can be stuck between the two.
     
  24. Floris macrumors 68020

    Floris

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Location:
    Netherlands
    #24
    I appreciate your following up on my post. In regards to the first one. Knowing better as in, if it's their business to repair stuff, doing their best to do so in a clean(er than usual) environment is something I'd expect. Unofficial or official reseller aside. If I pay for a service like that, I'd expect them to do a better job than my dad in the garage. Online instructions available or not. Point II, kinda just covered that I guess. okay, last one. III, okay, i didn't really knew that, clarified, my imacs still require suction cups to pull the glass off, detach monitor, do the swaps, reapply the monitor, and then there's usually dust behind them.
     
  25. tubeexperience macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    #25
    That only applies to the old (non-Slim) iMac.
     

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