Mac for go pro 4k

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by unixphone, Feb 24, 2019.

  1. unixphone macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    #1
    Hello,

    I have an entry MacBook 2015... it is a perfect laptop for me.
    However, it is very laggy when I try to do some video editing on my go pro 4k 120FPS. I tried to play them on iPhoto, Go Pro Quik and iMove. No luck.

    Do you think an iPad pro can handle 4k with 120FPS or 960 with 240FPS?
    Can Mac mini or iMac handle it?
    I am pretty new on the video editing...
     
  2. Fishrrman macrumors P6

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #2
    I don't do 4k editing.
    There are some here who do, and who are very knowledgeable, perhaps they'll enter the conversation.

    Having said that...
    For 4k, you probably want a 27" 5k i7 iMac.
    Or perhaps a 2018 Mac Mini with an i7.

    You'll want to use Final Cut Pro X and use the "create proxy media" option.

    Trying to edit 4k WITHOUT creating proxy media must be unbelievably slow on a 2015 MBP...
     
  3. ColdCase macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    NH
    #3
    As a data point, I have an iMac Pro with FCPX and work with 4k 30fps go pro video now and then. Thats the limit of my camera. The Mac doesn't break a sweat editing, no stutter, no lag, no need for proxy. I routinely work with 2K, however, as the intended destination works well with 720p and 2k gives me the best scaling/cropping compromise for my workflow.

    If you intend to stabilize or use other CPU intensive effects, you'd appreciate as much CPU horsepower as you can afford.
     
  4. Gwendolini macrumors 6502

    Gwendolini

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2015
    Location:
    random
    #4
    The current GoPro 7 can record in 4K at 50/60 frames per second and in 1080p the fps are 200/240, depending on regional setting.

    Where do you get the 4K 120fps from?

    As an aside, my 2016 MacBook struggle with the HEVC encoded 4k 50fps material, but if you have the time, you can let FPC X create proxies.
     
  5. unixphone, Feb 27, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2019

    unixphone thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    #5
    My bad.. it is 1440 with 120 and 960 with 240.

    Maybe I am not supposed to use 4k? Sorry, I am kind of new at this. I heard 2.7k with 60 is good for snowboarding.
    I have 2015 early MacBook. What settings can it handle? Do I need a new mac?
     
  6. e1me5 macrumors 6502

    e1me5

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2013
    Location:
    Cyprus
    #6
    It depends of what codec you record. If it's h264 then your mac is fine playing it, but if it's h265 (HEVC) then only newer macs can efficiently decode it.
     
  7. iluvmacs99, Apr 11, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2019

    iluvmacs99 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2019
    #7
    You need a video editing software that supports built-in GPU and none of the software you described do so effectively.

    Which is why I use VideoProc as it supports 4K and supposedly 8K editing (I haven't tried this) and works with Macs that support a GPU even with my 8 year old Mac Mini. Prior to VideoProc, I could not even play a 4K footage recorded with my Lumix camera with my 2011 Mac Mini. But when I use VideoProc, it not only played the footage perfectly, it also converts 4K to high quality 1080p really fast. It can up and downscale video formats really fast as it supports GPU rendering. VideoProc will analyze what GPU you have and will tell you what video resolution that it could render effectively, or it'll use proxies. Obviously the better the GPU, the higher video resolution it can render.

    I use VideoProc to basically downscale the 4K video to 1080p or Full HD, which is pretty high quality and then use for iMovie with 720p footage (my older Contour) to make action movies. Work really well! Wish I have a better GPU than what I got now so I could take even better advantage with VideoProc. The beauty of VideoProc is that it is very friendly to older hardware. You can get a really old Mac Pro with a power GPU (Radeon or GeForce with lots of video RAM) as it runs even on Snow Leopard, Mavericks and needs only 1Gb of ram. It's not resource intensive.

    If you like VideoProc, they are offering free giveaway licensing with no further updates to that software until this end of April. You need to look for the giveaway portal to earn your free copy so to speak.
     
  8. Fishrrman, Apr 12, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2019

    Fishrrman macrumors P6

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #8
    "If you like VideoProc, they are offering free giveaway licensing with no further updates to that software until this end of April. You need to look for the giveaway portal to earn your free copy so to speak."

    What's the URL for this?
     
  9. iluvmacs99 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2019
    #9
    https://www.videoproc.com/giveaway/
     
  10. k2focus macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2018
    Location:
    Scotland
    #10
    if you want a mac, then you are probably going to get a speced out mini or higher end iMac. neither of them are going to be amazing for that. if you truly only care about editing, and you are happy using your laptop for your main computer you should just buy a PC tower. anything with a new desktop i7 or i9 - 8th or 9th gen, along with desktop RAM, and a desktop GPU will do great. you'll also have the luxury of having multiple HDD bays so you can just install cheap storage.
     

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9 February 24, 2019