Mac G5 Xserve virtualazation

codman1004

macrumors member
Original poster
Mar 21, 2011
69
0
Iowa
So I have aquired this xserve and its a beast, could run anything I throw at it. EXCEPT its ppc :mad::mad::mad: I have thought about:
esxi: intel
virtual box:intel
Q:windows only(I need linux/s)
PearPC:eek:utdated and unsupported
is there anything out there that would work? I know that the xserve has basic server admin tools, but what I need for a small buisness network is:


firewall(xserve)(pfsense or something similar)
DNS(xserve)
File(xserve)
mail(xserve)

I need all this on one machine. virtulazation is really my only option....other then buying a new server which isn't in the budget. Any ideas?? Any and all help is much appreciated.
 

codman1004

macrumors member
Original poster
Mar 21, 2011
69
0
Iowa
So I have aquired this xserve and its a beast, could run anything I throw at it. EXCEPT its ppc :mad::mad::mad: I have thought about:
esxi: intel
virtual box:intel
Q:windows only(I need linux/s)
PearPC:eek:utdated and unsupported
is there anything out there that would work? I know that the xserve has basic server admin tools, but what I need for a small buisness network is:


firewall(xserve)(pfsense or something similar)
DNS(xserve)
File(xserve)
mail(xserve)

I need all this on one machine. virtulazation is really my only option....other then buying a new server which isn't in the budget. Any ideas?? Any and all help is much appreciated.
I must also say that the services, file dns etc can also be ran in a virtual scene or using xserve built in services... All I need is a firewall in front of the Xserve. With esxi I could say this is in front of that but i have no way of saying that. I looked, maybe not a hard as I should have but does the Xserve have a firewall for passing threw connections? I don't want to stick another box just for a firewall...... Sorry for rambling... Thanks
 

Wildy

macrumors 6502
Jan 25, 2011
323
0
Virtualizing a firewall on the same machine as your services is just not a done thing. pfSense and m0n0wall will both run on anything - so find another machine for this.

Realize that virtualization is different from emulation, and you will be taking a performance hit. While they both achieve the same thing (isolating one thing from the rest of a machine), virtualization solutions have been built with security in mind.

I'm not sure where you got the idea that Q is Windows-only. Q is just a graphical frontend for QEMU, which emulates command-line Linux just fine. If you really think it wise to do this, here is how it's going to work:

1. Use some command-line fu to create a virtual network interface for OS / application traffic.

2. Install the latest version of QEMU (my build is here, or install from Macports).

3. Install your firewall into QEMU (pfSense or m0n0wall).

4. Bridge the virtual network interface with that of QEMU.

5. Profit.

I'm not sure what your network throughput will be like, but I guess you'll find out. If you're security conscious enough to be running pfSense, you really shouldn't be using the solution above though. Consider a pf frontend instead - http://www.hanynet.com/icefloor/index.html.
 
Last edited:

codman1004

macrumors member
Original poster
Mar 21, 2011
69
0
Iowa
Virtualizing a firewall on the same machine as your services is just not a done thing. pfSense and m0n0wall will both run on anything - so find another machine for this.

Realize that virtualization is different from emulation, and you will be taking a performance hit. While they both achieve the same thing (isolating one thing from the rest of a machine), virtualization solutions have been built with security in mind.

I'm not sure where you got the idea that Q is Windows-only. Q is just a graphical frontend for QEMU, which emulates command-line Linux just fine. If you really think it wise to do this, here is how it's going to work:

1. Use some command-line fu to create a virtual network interface for OS / application traffic.

2. Install the latest version of QEMU (my build is here, or install from Macports).

3. Install your firewall into QEMU (pfSense or m0n0wall).

4. Bridge the virtual network interface with that of QEMU.

5. Profit.

I'm not sure what your network throughput will be like, but I guess you'll find out. If you're security conscious enough to be running pfSense, you really shouldn't be using the solution above though. Consider a pf frontend instead - http://www.hanynet.com/icefloor/index.html.
Thank you, icefloor is just what I need and I can still use the Mac services. Thanks!