Mac (iMac) PCI ports

Discussion in 'iMac' started by Yopladas, Nov 25, 2009.

  1. Yopladas macrumors newbie

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    Sep 4, 2008
    #1
    Was thinking about what PCI ports Macs use. In particular, aluminum iMacs (the current gen, one before it and one before that). I know it's some custom Apple PCI port, but was wondering if you could nab a surplus graphics card that might fit it. (If you wanted a better card than the one you have, but that card was not in your computer, BUT it is made by Apple for a better version).

    also, do the PCI ports change per generation? I was guessing that's too much work on the part of Apple/ATI.

    So tl;dr: what PCI slot do Macs use? :apple:
     
  2. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #2
    They use custom cards with MXM slots.
     
  3. Yopladas thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #3
    So similar to many laptops, or a CUSTOM MXM slot?
     
  4. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #4
    From what I can gather, it uses the physical MXM slot but has its own pin assignments. I have never seen an iMac have its graphics card upgraded in the nearly 4 years that Intel iMacs have been around.
     
  5. Yopladas thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #5
    Thanks. Well, I guess that means the only feasible solution to upgrade a card, without much pin-modding and soldering is finding surplus, or raiding a factory in China.
     
  6. Buzz Bumble Guest

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    #6
    Probably because it's not really worth the time and money to do it. By the time Apple has a newer graphics card or the iMacs, most people will be buying a new one anyway.

    Technically it is possible (at least on some models of iMac) since Apple do offer build-to-order options of different graphics cards. Of course, the general public can't actually buy those cards, so you would have to go through a repair centre who might be able to get one as a "replacement" card.
     
  7. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #7
    I have seen the cards at various places like apple-parts.com but, as you say, by the time they are there, its not worth it. And they are not cheap: $150 for an HD2600. Furthermore, you would have to mod the heat sinks to fit your particular iMac. Apple really have strived hard to produce machines that can't be piecemeal upgraded like PCs. "Sell your old one and buy a new one" is the Apple way of upgrading.
     
  8. zmttoxics macrumors 65816

    zmttoxics

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    #8
    I think you will find that if you search the forums there are some cases of people pulling this manoeuvre off (going from a 7300 to a 7600 or something of the sort).
     
  9. Buzz Bumble Guest

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    #9
    You can find parts being sold by some (usually dodgey places), but part of Apple's official repair centre agreement is that they cannot on-sell parts to the public. Repair centres are only allowed to buy parts that they themselves are going to be installing / replacing into customers' computers.

    In some cases of course there are also compatible parts made by another company, but that's rare outside of general parts like RAM, hard drives and proper cards for the Mac Pros.
     
  10. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #10
  11. Buzz Bumble Guest

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    #11
    The parts may well be genuine, but their legality and morals are questionable since by selling the parts direct to the public they (or their suppliers) are breaking an agreement with Apple ... assuming of course that they are brand new parts and not "recycled" working parts from non-working machines.
     
  12. Yopladas thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #12
    I am an evil, evil man and have no morals. I am lawless and make little rabbits cry, for being on the border of thinking about breaking an agreement.

    If anything, it's immoral of Apple and their need to keep people from upgrading that's immoral. Either way, who says I'm using OSX? :) there's no agreement for the computer, just the OS.If you can tell me what agreement I'm therefore breaking, tell me what it is and where I can find what you're talking about.



    And I saw that earlier, but have no idea what GPU that is. Googled the name, but only found a link back to the product, no other recognizable names. Pointers to what it could be? Also, is the slow/cards compatible with newer models? (Not the 27", but the latest 24"? a.k.a. 24" from 2008/2009? I just ask as the link says 2009)
     
  13. old-wiz macrumors G3

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    #13
    I think the point is that the suppliers may have an agreement with Apple not to sell directly to consumers. It's not a problem for you; you're welcome to buy any parts you want and try to install it on a Mac. However, Apple won't help you if you break the machine in the process.
     
  14. Buzz Bumble Guest

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    #14
    Yep, that's correct. Opening up your iMac (with the exception of the RAM sockets) will void the warranty / AppleCare. :)

    The suppliers' agreement with Apple was created to stop repair centres selling parts to customers, who could then (theoretically) build their own Mac from scratch ... not really a cost-effective way of making a Mac if you're using only genuine Apple parts, but some parts could of course be substituted for off-the-shelf PC parts. As far as I know this agreement is still in place for all official Apple repair centres, so for any company to get / sell genuine, new Apple parts is at best dodgey.
     
  15. Niklaas macrumors newbie

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    Apr 28, 2008
    #15
    76XT means the ATI mobility 2600 XT Chip so there are 3 possible reasons for this.

    - it´s an false information on the site
    - Apple used the ATI card and called it Geforce Gt120
    - there are no reserve Gt120 so they build an ATI 2600 on MXMIII so you get more decision options.

    The card has the same price than the other ATI 2600

    Also notice:
    Older Imacs use MXM II ( 20") 2008/2007 (24") 2006 and MXM HE (24") 2008/2007
     
  16. Yopladas thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 4, 2008
    #16
    :) Thanks for the info.

    Well I guess that sums up all my questions.
    :D
     

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