Mac is showing a warning before I empty the trash

alimccarley

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 11, 2008
13
0
Brighton, UK
The box is unchecked in the Finder preferences.

I drag (or Command-Delete) an item to the trash and a window pops up saying, 'Are you sure you want to delete "x"? This item will be deleted immediately. You can't undo this action.

I've trawled the interweb but to no alas, and being a Mac user for over 10 years have never seen this before. Any help will be greatly appreciated!
 

chown33

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 9, 2009
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That's the dialog you get when you trash a file residing on a network share. It's been this way since the very first Mac was networked with LocalTalk.
 

BlueRevolution

macrumors 603
Jul 26, 2004
6,054
2
Montreal, QC
My Mac is Journaled HFS+ - is HFS+ the same as HFS?
Yes, HFS+ is the upgraded version of HFS. The shift from HFS to HFS+ is analogous (and roughly contemporaneous) to Windows' move from FAT32 to NTFS, although HFS+ is closely related to HFS where FAT32 and NTFS are completely different filesystems. I just referred to it as the broad type HFS because the older version isn't around anymore and the + looked weird in the hyphenated term, but I guess that backfired.

If so, why is this still happening? This has only begun since I installed Snow Leopard.
Oh, this is happening on your system (boot) partition?
 

chown33

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Aug 9, 2009
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That also applies non-HFS local drives/partitions.
Not on my Mac. I just tried it on a FAT-format USB flash drive, and dragging a file to the Trash moves it to the Trash.

I also did 'ls -la' on the mounted volume, and it shows a ".Trashes" directory. An 'ls -laR' shows the trashed file, in an appropriately numbered sub-dir.


Getting back to the OP, maybe there's a permissions problem on the drive, and the Finder is unable to move the item to the appropriate Trash folder, so it offers the option of immediately deleting it. That's hypothetical: I don't know that Finder does this.

If the OP could copy and paste the following command in a Terminal window:
/sbin/mount
Then copy and paste the output into a posting, it may provide some clues.
 

BlueRevolution

macrumors 603
Jul 26, 2004
6,054
2
Montreal, QC
Not on my Mac. I just tried it on a FAT-format USB flash drive, and dragging a file to the Trash moves it to the Trash.

I also did 'ls -la' on the mounted volume, and it shows a ".Trashes" directory. An 'ls -laR' shows the trashed file, in an appropriately numbered sub-dir.
Hmm, maybe it's just NTFS and remote drives.

Getting back to the OP, maybe there's a permissions problem on the drive, and the Finder is unable to move the item to the appropriate Trash folder, so it offers the option of immediately deleting it. That's hypothetical: I don't know that Finder does this.
Good point. I didn't think that this was happening on the boot partition, but it sounds like that's the case. To the OP: have you tried repairing permissions? It could be that your computer doesn't have write permissions to the trash directories.
 

chown33

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Aug 9, 2009
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Hmm, maybe it's just NTFS and remote drives.
If it were happening on NTFS, it implies Mac OS X can write to NTFS. I don't think it does that by default, and would require added software.

I don't think Repair Permissions will fix a mis-permissioned trash directory. Repair Permissions typically works by reading BOMs (Bill-Of-Material files) in the Receipts database and comparing to items on disk. I don't think a disk's .Trashes dir has a receipt. Still, I don't think it would hurt to run Repair Permissions, and I could be wrong about what it will repair.
 

BlueRevolution

macrumors 603
Jul 26, 2004
6,054
2
Montreal, QC
If it were happening on NTFS, it implies Mac OS X can write to NTFS. I don't think it does that by default, and would require added software.
Yes, obviously with NTFS-3G.

I don't think Repair Permissions will fix a mis-permissioned trash directory. Repair Permissions typically works by reading BOMs (Bill-Of-Material files) in the Receipts database and comparing to items on disk. I don't think a disk's .Trashes dir has a receipt. Still, I don't think it would hurt to run Repair Permissions, and I could be wrong about what it will repair.
If not, it's easy enough to use chmod (and maybe chown ;)) to fix the trashes by hand.
 

mab

macrumors newbie
Feb 19, 2010
2
0
I was getting the same error message. All the permissions were correct. I got rid of the problem by just quitting the Finder and restarting it.
 

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