Mac Mini all settled in, now, essential software?

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by Sir Ruben, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. Sir Ruben macrumors 65816

    Sir Ruben

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    #1
    Okay as a first time mac owner Ive slowly been getting it all set up the way I like. Ive added a Dell Ultrasharp monitor (connected via thunderbolt to mini displayport), and I'll soon be upgrading to 16gb of ram and adding a magic trackpad. Im even considering removing the poor Dell soundbar from the monitor (its very weak, almost as weak as the Mac Mini's built in speaker, but was also very cheap) and replacing it with Bose Companion 20 speakers.

    Anyway Im now looking towards the software side of things. I have installed Aperture 3, iWork '09, and Microsoft Office 2011 as these are pretty essential to me. However being a Mac n00b Im sure there are plenty of excellent programs I need to check out.

    So can anyone recommend some essential Mac software that will enhance my Mac experience? It doesnt matter what it is, big or small, as long as its useful!
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
  3. slayerizer macrumors 6502a

    slayerizer

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2012
    Location:
    Canada
    #3
    - forklift or pathfinder (file copy/move operation)
    - pixelmator (budget priced but almost as complete as photoshop)
    - transmit (if you need any ftp/sftp transfer), you can even mount remote sites as local virtual drive
    - coda2 (any web programming)
    - imovie
    - garage band
    - iwork
    - dropbox (free account)
    - vlc (to play non supported video files)
    - handbrake (video conversion)
    - adium (msn/yahoo/... ) messenger
    - xmarks for safari (to sync my bookmarks
    - utorrent

    and probably some more I don't recall.. Ihave one for itunes that download lyrics and missing album artwork.




    I usually also set my hot corners (in the preferences): I set one to disable screen saver, one for screen saver, one for sleep.
     
  4. Sir Ruben thread starter macrumors 65816

    Sir Ruben

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    #4
    Thanks both, plenty of suggestions there to get me started.

    Oh, Im using a PC keyboard, its a nice backlit Logitech one so I plan on keelying it. Is there any way to get the @ symbol back where it belongs rather than haveing to use the '2' key all the time?
     
  5. lamerica80 macrumors 6502a

    lamerica80

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    #5
    I could not live without photoshop elements and lightroom. Skype. Spotify. Unrarx for unpackin them there torrents.
     
  6. That-Guy macrumors 6502a

    That-Guy

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Location:
    UK
    #6
    Here is some of the apps I am running:

    - Tweetbot
    - CleanMyMac
    - Dropbox
    - Filezilla
    - Screenflow
    - Skype
    - uTorrent
    - Adobe Photoshop / Fireworks / Dreamweaver
    - HandyPrint (airprint enabler)
    - Chrome
    - Perian Codecs (allows quicktime to play loads more video formats)
    - BetterSnapTool
    - WinZip Mac

    Hope this gives you some ideas :)
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    I would not recommend CleanMyMac, based on the number of complaints that have been posted in this forum and elsewhere. As an example: CleanMyMac cleaned too much. While you may not have experienced problems yet, enough people have that it's wise to avoid it, especially since there are free alternatives that have better reputations, such as Onyx.

    You don't need "cleaner" or "maintenance" apps to keep your Mac running well, and some of these apps can do more harm than good. Most only remove files/folders or unused languages or architectures, which does nothing more than free up some drive space, with the risk of deleting something important in the process.

    These apps will not make your Mac run faster or more efficiently, since having stuff stored on a drive does not impact performance, unless you're running out of drive space. In fact, deleting some caches can hurt performance, rather than help it, since more system resources are used and performance suffers while each cache is being rebuilt.

    Many of these tasks should only be done selectively to troubleshoot specific problems, not en masse as routine maintenance.

    Mac OS X does a good job of taking care of itself, without the need for 3rd party software. Among other things, it has its own maintenance scripts that run silently in the background on a daily, weekly and monthly basis, without user intervention.

     

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