Mac Mini Mid 2011 - Sierra VS High Sierra

Should I upgrade my Mac Mini Mid 2011 to High Sierra?


  • Total voters
    7

Almogos

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Sep 14, 2018
14
9
Hi Everyone!

I got a Mac Mini Mid 2011 with:

2.5 GHz Intel Core i5
AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB
8GB of RAM
128GB SSD for OS and 1TB WD Black for user folders

Currently running 10.12.6. Overall the performance is fine along fast boot times.

I'm really wondering if I should upgrade to High Sierra.

Would love to hear your feedbacks about this machine\OS version.

Thanks!!

Almog
 

JoeInMilwaukee

macrumors regular
Apr 7, 2015
136
147
Milwaukee, WI
Thanks for the link!

I'm all for APFS and it will definitely benefit SSDs, but am waiting for DiskWarrior to fully support it. My understanding is that Apple hasn't released full specs for APFS that Alsoft (DiskWarrior's developer) needs.

Another thing to consider is that older Macs that can't run High Sierra or above won't be able to read any APFS-formatted disks.
 
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Reactions: Almogos

davidlv

macrumors 65816
Apr 5, 2009
1,285
28
Kyoto, Japan
Thanks for the link!

I'm all for APFS and it will definitely benefit SSDs, but am waiting for DiskWarrior to fully support it. My understanding is that Apple hasn't released full specs for APFS that Alsoft (DiskWarrior's developer) needs.

Another thing to consider is that older Macs that can't run High Sierra or above won't be able to read any APFS-formatted disks.
I felt the same way about the lack of an APFS capable version of Disk Warrior, and decided to install HS without converting to APFS. Using the info below (accumulated from various sources on this forum), everything went fine.

Install HighSierra without converting to APFS
Make sure the installer file is in the /Applications folder, run one of the commands below from the terminal.

/Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/startosinstall --converttoapfs NO


/Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/startosinstall --applicationpath /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app --agreetolicense --converttoapfs NO --nointeraction

Note: When you enter your password in Terminal, no text will be displayed, giving the impression that Terminal isn’t accepting your input. This is a security feature to ensure prying eyes can’t see your password as it is typed.

You’ll be presented with the license for using macOS High Sierra. You can agree to the license terms by entering a capital A at the prompt.

The startosinstall script will start copying needed files to the target disk (in this example, the current startup disk). You’ll see Terminal counting up to one hundred. When it reaches 100, all the needed files will have been copied, and your Mac will reboot and start the actual installation of the new operating system without converting the startup disk to APFS.

To specify what drive to install macOS High Sierra on, other than the startup drive, you need to add the following to either of the Terminal command lines listed above:

— volume /path to the volume you wish to use

An example for installing macOS High Sierra on a drive named HighSierra without converting the target volume to APFS would be:

sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/startosinstall –applicationpath /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app –converttoapfs NO –volume /Volumes/HighSierra


This would force the installation to occur on a volume named HighSierra. An easy way to enter the actual pathname to the drive you wish to use is to enter the command in Terminal without the actual pathname, so the command would end after — volume (make sure there’s a space after the word volume). Now drag the drive from the Finder and drop it on the Terminal window. Terminal will add the actual pathname to the drive for you. All that’s left to do is press enter or return.

By using the startosinstall command from within Terminal, the choice to convert to APFS or leave the target drive’s format unchanged is entirely up to you.
 

tibas92013

macrumors 6502
Jun 2, 2013
467
83
Costa Rica
About an hour ago I upgraded from OS Sierra to OS High Sierra on my MM(Late 2014) 2.8GHz, 8GB Ram, 256SSD and everything went A-OK as I increased my storage capacity by around 6GB.!

I do not plan on upgrading from OS Sierra to OS High Sierra on my other MM(Late 2012) 2.5GHz,16GB Ram, 500GB HD. My reason for not upgrading is the "Spinner" HD.
 

JoeInMilwaukee

macrumors regular
Apr 7, 2015
136
147
Milwaukee, WI
I felt the same way about the lack of an APFS capable version of Disk Warrior, and decided to install HS without converting to APFS. Using the info below (accumulated from various sources on this forum), everything went fine.

Install HighSierra without converting to APFS
Make sure the installer file is in the /Applications folder, run one of the commands below from the terminal.

/Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/startosinstall --converttoapfs NO


/Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/startosinstall --applicationpath /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app --agreetolicense --converttoapfs NO --nointeraction

Note: When you enter your password in Terminal, no text will be displayed, giving the impression that Terminal isn’t accepting your input. This is a security feature to ensure prying eyes can’t see your password as it is typed.

You’ll be presented with the license for using macOS High Sierra. You can agree to the license terms by entering a capital A at the prompt.

The startosinstall script will start copying needed files to the target disk (in this example, the current startup disk). You’ll see Terminal counting up to one hundred. When it reaches 100, all the needed files will have been copied, and your Mac will reboot and start the actual installation of the new operating system without converting the startup disk to APFS.

To specify what drive to install macOS High Sierra on, other than the startup drive, you need to add the following to either of the Terminal command lines listed above:

— volume /path to the volume you wish to use

An example for installing macOS High Sierra on a drive named HighSierra without converting the target volume to APFS would be:

sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/startosinstall –applicationpath /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app –converttoapfs NO –volume /Volumes/HighSierra


This would force the installation to occur on a volume named HighSierra. An easy way to enter the actual pathname to the drive you wish to use is to enter the command in Terminal without the actual pathname, so the command would end after — volume (make sure there’s a space after the word volume). Now drag the drive from the Finder and drop it on the Terminal window. Terminal will add the actual pathname to the drive for you. All that’s left to do is press enter or return.

By using the startosinstall command from within Terminal, the choice to convert to APFS or leave the target drive’s format unchanged is entirely up to you.
Thanks! I might give this a try late this year or in January. Right how I have an HDD in my main Mac, so upgrading from Sierra to High Sierra won't entail converting to APFS. However, I'm considering installing an SSD at some point.
[doublepost=1537140833][/doublepost]
About an hour ago I upgraded from OS Sierra to OS High Sierra on my MM(Late 2014) 2.8GHz, 8GB Ram, 256SSD and everything went A-OK as I increased my storage capacity by around 6GB.!

I do not plan on upgrading from OS Sierra to OS High Sierra on my other MM(Late 2012) 2.5GHz,16GB Ram, 500GB HD. My reason for not upgrading is the "Spinner" HD.
I also have a Late 2012 Mac mini (running Sierra) with an HDD, which is my primary machine. If High Sierra supported APFS on HDDs I would probably upgrade my Mac mini this winter when I do my annual macOS upgrades (I've been staying one macOS behind the latest for the past 5 years or so).

My understanding is that when Mojave is available later this month it will support APFS for HDDs and Fusion Drives (at least that's what was very briefly mentioned near the end of Apple's June 4 Keynote).
 

tibas92013

macrumors 6502
Jun 2, 2013
467
83
Costa Rica
Thanks! I might give this a try late this year or in January. Right how I have an HDD in my main Mac, so upgrading from Sierra to High Sierra won't entail converting to APFS. However, I'm considering installing an SSD at some point.
[doublepost=1537140833][/doublepost]

I also have a Late 2012 Mac mini (running Sierra) with an HDD, which is my primary machine. If High Sierra supported APFS on HDDs I would probably upgrade my Mac mini this winter when I do my annual macOS upgrades (I've been staying one macOS behind the latest for the past 5 years or so).

My understanding is that when Mojave is available later this month it will support APFS for HDDs and Fusion Drives (at least that's what was very briefly mentioned near the end of Apple's June 4 Keynote).
For the last three(3) years I have always decided to upgrade the OS on my MM a week or so BEFORE the new OS is issued by the Apple Folks. I figured that all the "Major Kinks" on OS High Sierra have been resolved over the past year or so.
 
Last edited:

JoeInMilwaukee

macrumors regular
Apr 7, 2015
136
147
Milwaukee, WI
For the last three(3) years I have always decided to upgrade the OS on my MM a week or so BEFORE the new OS is issued by the Apple Folks. I figured that all the "Major Kinks" on OS High Sierra have been resolved over the past year or so.
Very true! I usually just wait until December or January because I have more free time then.
 
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