mac mini runs hot???

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by garyleecn, Apr 30, 2015.

  1. garyleecn macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2014
    #1
    i have this mac mini set up running for almost a year. but recently it gets hotter and hotter. i've cleaned the fans and blowed all dusts. but the cpu gets >70C even it's just sitting there doing nothing. and the case feels really warm.

    is it really normal for it to run this hot?? or anyone has any idea to cool it down??
     
  2. Celerondon, May 1, 2015
    Last edited: May 16, 2015

    Celerondon macrumors 6502a

    Celerondon

    Joined:
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    #2
    Distributed Computing Project (again)?

    No that is not normal garyleecn. I expect that your fan is continuously whirring at 70°C. (Yeah, silently "whirring" at an 1800 rpm idle!)

    Which mini model do you have? Which operating system is it running?

    Some may advise you to start by cranking your fan speed up with a utility. I think that you should determine what is wrong with your machine first. Utility software such as Temperature Gauge (TG) from Tunabelly will tell you which components are overheating. TG will probably confirm that some rogue task has your CPU working overtime. If the CPU is your culprit, then the % CPU column in Activity Monitor can tell you which program or task is cranking away all the time.

    If you use these two utilities you could be well on your way to solving this problem.
     

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  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #3
    It's most likely not sitting there doing nothing. Use Activity Monitor to see what apps or processes are consuming system resources.
     
  4. Celerondon macrumors 6502a

    Celerondon

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    #4
    SETI@Home?

    These are the important facts.

    At this time, suggestions to get smcFanControl or to crack your mini's guts open to replace the thermal paste are premature.
     
  5. for this macrumors regular

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    Nov 18, 2014
    #5
    My 2012 base model stays around 49-50c and goes up to 65c when I'm using Photoshop, regardless of room temperature.
     
  6. garyleecn thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 25, 2014
    #6

    i use it basically as a nas, so it's really not doing much.. except i have utorrent downloading in background at less then 1m
    and i use istat menus, the cpu idle is usually ~90% to 95%

    ----------



    yeah I'm using fan controls, that's why i can keep it at 70C

    ----------



    mine is the 2012 quad core one, guess that's why?
     
  7. bax2003 macrumors 6502a

    bax2003

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    Location:
    Belgrade, Serbia
    #7
    Mac mini Late 2012 Quad runs hot - FACT, in order to stay quiet as long as possible. Its fine on browsing or watching videos....but you could buy i5 for that. So if you bought Quad i7 for serious CPU work, get used to heat and noise.

    Only thing you can do is to speed up fan a bit, to the point where noise does not bother you.
     
  8. garyleecn thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2014
    #8
    i just realized that my mac mini is running 15w cpu while it's sitting there doing nothing..
    any idea how to reduce that power??

    ----------

    yeah, I'm planning to get a cabin for the mini and super noisy drobo..

    i bought this to use as a server, and also a plex server. so i need better cpu performance for multiple transcoding streams. guess it's a little over killed given the heat it produces.
     
  9. Celerondon, May 1, 2015
    Last edited: May 1, 2015

    Celerondon macrumors 6502a

    Celerondon

    Joined:
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    #9
    What is the 1800 rpm Fan Idle - CPU Temp Threshold?

    Oops that was wrong! Next time I will wake up before I start typing. Your mini should be silent until 85°C. Is it?

    What is the ambient temperature in the room where your mini lives?

    2012 i7s should not run that hot when they are not doing any work! Did you begin using a fan control program before you checked for runaway processes or other causes for your high CPU temperatures?

    Your mini is either cooking or sick. Something is very wrong here.

    You should probably solve your temp issue before you worry about that 15 watt idle concern. Where did that number come from anyway? Doesn't Apple state an 11 watt idle spec for the 2012 2.3 mini? That mini is one of the more energy frugal machines around. I suggest that you look at the 2014 mini if lower idle power consumption is a big deal for you. 6 watts is quite low but I would rather have that i7 quad core than bragging rights on the lowest idle power number.
     
  10. garyleecn thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2014
    #10

    yes, i have fan control enabled. the fan speed is around 2100-2200 to maintain 70c.
    the power consumption, it's from the istat menus drop down menu. the 'cpu package total' I'm not worried about the power consumption, i said that because i think 15w idle is way to high, i used to have another mini, which runs XBMC with 7w. and i guess the heat is because of the extra power.
     
  11. Celerondon, May 1, 2015
    Last edited: May 7, 2015

    Celerondon macrumors 6502a

    Celerondon

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    #11
    That is the odd part of your situation. An i7 doesn't use more power because of its capabilities. Instead that quad core of yours should use more power and make more heat when it does more work.

    What is your machine doing?
     
  12. benji888 macrumors 65816

    benji888

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    #12
    What OS X are you running?

    I swear my 2010 MBP is running hotter, and it crashes sometimes, but only since 10.10.3.

    If you are running 10.10.3, and then noticed it getting hotter, I would guess 10.10.3 is the culprit. I downloaded Macs Fan Control to see what is going on with CPU temp.
     
  13. benji888 macrumors 65816

    benji888

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    #13
    I can confirm that 10.10.3 is causing my Mac to run too hot:

    I was playing Flash video today (Safari) and doing other things and my Mac shut itself off today. I started it back up and it got things going again and I watched the temp., it was hovering around 88ºC with the fan at max. speed, and I think it shuts down over 90º? So, 10.10.3 is doing something with graphics that is causing the processor to be getting too hot? (NOTE: this is also with the new Safari update.) Previously, I think the OS would do something to prevent overheating, but, ????? This has only been happening w/10.10.3, not any previous OS X, on this Mac, ever.

    (me: 2010 MBP 13") I've also had it lockup on me.

    When a Mac shuts itself off, it's typically because the CPU is overheating, to prevent damage.

    So, it's not a hardware issue, nor is it specific to one Mac, I also see other posts w/similar issues on other Macs. (Crashes, kernel panics, lockups, warmer/hotter, shut itself off.)
     
  14. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    Oct 25, 2008
    #14
    I don't know if it is the OS or Safari but when I get those damn ads that use flash and shockwave etc., I watch the temps go up up up. I also notice it on Firefox as well.
     
  15. benji888 macrumors 65816

    benji888

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    #15
    This helps nothing, as the issues are with 10.10.3, not what any user is doing. I have seen various reports of Macs having issues related to graphics use, they can be running hotter, or kernel panics, lockups, shut itself off (overheating). This has only been since 10.10.3, so the problem is with something Apple has done with graphics use in the OS.

    • Best thing to do, report issues with Apple using Apple feedback, and perhaps they will fix it. Go here, pick your particular type of Mac and be sure to select "Bug Report" from the dropdown: http://www.apple.com/feedback/
     
  16. newellj macrumors 601

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    Boston, MA, US
    #16
    Same here. Rolled back to 10.10.2 and temps have fallen roughly 10 degrees C.
     
  17. Celerondon macrumors 6502a

    Celerondon

    Joined:
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    #17
    Who Mentioned “...what any user is doing?”

    QUOTE=benji888;21207860]I swear my 2010 MBP is running hotter, and it crashes sometimes, but only since 10.10.3.

    If you are running 10.10.3, and then noticed it getting hotter, I would guess 10.10.3 is the culprit. I downloaded Macs Fan Control to see what is going on with CPU temp.[/QUOTE]

    At least benji888 has provided the OP with a clear choice. Maybe garyleecn followed our early advice to collect information in an effort to identify the cause of this overheating problem. Or the OP may have chosen benji888's suggestion to skip the research and report the problem to Apple because "...perhaps they will fix it."

    Either way garyleecn should note some facts as he proceeds with this issue:

    • The first step that benji took towards solving his issue was to download a fan control/diagnostic app!
    • Mac mini overheating advice from benji is coming from a user who does not understand how our Macs manage heat. Did he really inform you “I think it shuts down over 90º?”
    • Last year Yosemite was linked to overheating complaints by some users. After months of updates and experience, it might not be wise to assume that (a) your computer has the same problem or (b) that it is somehow better not to perform your own research.

    Three years ago (long before Yosemite) GGJstudios posted this helpful guide to help Mac users learn how our machines handle heat.
    http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=14674444&postcount=2

    See the attached screen shot to correct more of benji's misinformation. It is normal for a working mini to go well above 90º C. The two CPU usage monitors show the difference between transcoding a video with Handbrake (left) and surfing with Safari (right). The temperature and fan speed readings at the top of the image are associated with the left graph.
     

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  18. benji888 macrumors 65816

    benji888

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    #18
    Since I posted I burned some DVDs to my HDD with HandBrake and the temp. went up to 92º-97º, so, I am not sure that my Mac shuts itself down because of heat, it could be crashing to the point of shutting down, but, it seems like it was heat related, but, when I said 90º, that was a guess, I do not know what temperature it shuts down at, and I was not looking at the screen when at the instant it shut down, so not sure what temp. it was. That is, perhaps, the only misinformation.

    However, it does run hotter with 10.10.3 than it did with any previous OS X. And, I will say it again, it locks up and hasn't done this for years, literally, only since 10.10.3. Other reports of crashes I have seen are graphics related. So, this issue does need to be reported to apple. My machine is too old to get official support, call them or go to genius bar and send diagnostics from my Mac to apple so they can see what is the problem and fix it, and, the feedback for which I provided a link only supports text entry, and limited at that, which is kind of stupid on Apple's part. (Core2Duo machines and newer are considered "supported" by Apple, in that, they will still take OS updates.)

    One other thing I noticed, System Preferences>Accessibility>Reduce Transparency no longer has effect...it may stay checked when I check it, but, upon restart it unchecks itself. So, there is something wrong there. Either Apple shuts it off for certain machines (such as mine), so on/off doesn't matter, or, this might be part of where the bug is.

    Someone else stated here that going back to 10.10.2 their machine dropped 10ºC. So, the issue is with 10.10.3. I am sure there are plenty of people that aren't reporting or may not notice or care that their machines run hotter, or may have lockups and such, but, don't go to forums and report them. I am sure this is more widespread than indicated. Maybe it is limited to machines with integrated graphics? Or certain graphics chips/cards?

    So, if there is a way to give apple diagnostics from my machine so I can send the info. to them to fix the issue, please let me and OP know, as I would gladly do this, and share that info. with other posts I have seen. (I did allow apple to receive info. from my mac when I installed OS X.)
     
  19. Celerondon macrumors 6502a

    Celerondon

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    #19
    There Is No Single “Yosemite Overheating Problem”...

    …but your solution IS within reach!

    I can’t disprove the theory that Yosemite 10.10.3 is causing your computer and others to “run hotter”. I do not have information to dispute the idea that Yosemite makes certain Macs run hot. However I have noticed that much of the evidence is stale, anecdotal, and/or ambiguous.

    Full Internet searches for Yosemite linked overheating complaints yield a cluster of hits from late 2014 into January 2015. A scan of the MacRumors Yosemite forum was more telling. There were only two overheating threads in the first five pages of the Yosemite forum. Between the first thread (yours) and the second one there were less than 15 total posts. Did you read that second (two post) thread? The OP (soccerrocks314) solved a problem with a specific solution that was found on an Apple Support Community page.

    I suggest that the value in that second thread is how soccerrocks314 found a solution rather than what the OP eventually found. Note how the OP began by identifying the conditions and applications that existed when the problem was observed. Then soccerrocks314 collected and provided the data:
    1. Temperature Gauge indicated that the Mac’s hardware was hot at 98°.
    2. Activity Monitor showed that a process called “discoveryd” was utilizing %100 of the CPU.

    This systematic approach was so powerful that soccerrocks314 reported in the next post that he(or she) had resolved the issue!

    If you reread your own overheating thread and follow those constructive suggestions to collect and analyze data you should find that you can solve your own problem as well. For help you can collect some data and post it here for feedback and suggestions.
     

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