Mac Mini server/network configuration

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by camflan, Nov 24, 2014.

  1. camflan macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    #1
    I'm attempting to set up a mac mini server (brand new, Yosemite 10.10.1) on our network at the office.

    We have an unmanaged 16 port switch that runs out to all of our workstations and a couple of WAPs that I'd like to run as just WAPs.
    Mac Mini has a Pegasus2 for backups, etc.
    I'd like to run VPN, DHCP, DNS, Time Machine, and OpenDirectory off this machine. I have the WAPs in bridge mode.

    Do I need to use a Thunderbolt Ethernet adapter to get 2 interfaces in order to run this as a DHCP server to the entire network?

    I tried to plug all of the workstations, the modem, the mini, and the WAPs into the switch and was never able to pull NAT'd addresses off the Mac Mini, just public IPs.

    What am I missing?
     
  2. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #2
    Is DHCP enabled on the Mini? I am guessing you have another DHCP server (perhaps a modem/router combo) on the router currently due to the fact that they can pull public addresses.
     
  3. chiawen.yang macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2012
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    #3
    Yep, use Internet sharing option under system preferences.

    Share from your Ethernet port on the Mac mini to your USB to Ethernet adaptor, Amazon has usb3.0 to gigabit adapters cheaper than Apple 10/100mbps adaptors.

    If you are connecting the modem to the unmanaged switch and the office computers to that same switch and you still get internet access with all different IPs, you probably have multiple IP block service in your business Internet service.

    Otherwise, Internet modem to Mac mini and share the Internet with the USB to Ethernet adaptor connecting to your switch.
     
  4. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #4
    While Internet Sharing is a good option, a USB to Ethernet adapter is not a good solution. The Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapter is by far the best solution in this situation.
     
  5. chiawen.yang macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2012
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    #5

    I know thunderbolt at 20GB/s has higher transfer rate than USB 3.0 at 5GB/s but I don't know of any hard drive that will read/write that fast. I guess if you want to go beyond what is necessary, use thunderbolt which is 20GB/s.

    No business/home internet is 1GB/s that I know so the bottle neck is still the max the hard drive read/writes and your internet connection. That's how I think of it, I might be wrong.


    http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/...te-Throughput-Maximum-h2benchw-3.16,2903.html

    http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/...ad-Throughput-Maximum-h2benchw-3.16,2900.html
     
  6. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #6
    The average price of a USB to Ethernet adapter is about the same as the Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapter. The cheaper USB adapters are only usually supporting 10/100 speeds where later model USB 3.0 and the Thunderbolt adapters are Gigabit. In an environment with a server, you always want Gigabit at least.

    I then bring up the question, why bother with a USB to Ethernet adapter that requires third party drivers when a Thunderbolt adapter is made by Apple and is plug and play?
     
  7. chiawen.yang macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2012
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    #7

    Maybe cost might be a factor, I know it's easier to just use Apple hardware for Apple hardware. But something that does the same thing for a cheaper cost should not be overlooked. Gigabit is definitely required for his office situation.


    Apple's thunderbolt to ethernet adaptor also requires drivers, but those are installed along with your OS X as system files and such. Non-Apple devices are loaded separately with CD/USB/OS X driver search and download, some might even be plug and play, no idea...

    Always present the options to the Bosses :cool: and let them decide, save money or spend more and use it as a business expense write-off.

    Also get 2, because when it fails, you can just plug the backup in (even if it it's a cheap $10 USB 2.0 to Ethernet 10/100) and make yourself look like a IT God while the new one is on order with minimal downtime.
     
  8. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #8
    While I agree with the backup solution being a cheap USB adapter, I do think it is best to go with the Apple solution due to the seamless plug and play, official support from Apple, and consistent driver updates with every OS upgrade.
     

Share This Page