Mac Mini w/ Leopard refuses to shut down or reboot

Discussion in 'macOS' started by Anuba, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. Anuba macrumors 68040

    Anuba

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2005
    #1
    Selecting Sleep from the Apple Menu works fine.

    Waking up the machine from Sleep also works fine.

    Selecting Shut Down or Restart, however, accomplishes very little. The menu bar disappears, and so do the desktop icons, but the dock and the desktop background just sit there forever (I gave it 30 minutes, that's where I draw the line!) until I click the Finder icon in the dock. This makes the menu bar and the desktop icons reappear like nothing happened.

    Ideas?
     
  2. TEG macrumors 604

    TEG

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Location:
    Langley, Washington
    #3
    I had this problem before and it was fixed by repairing permissions once, booting into safe mode another, and other times it was a hard drive problem. Worst case, a full reinstall may be required.

    TEG
     
  3. Anuba thread starter macrumors 68040

    Anuba

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2005
    #4
    No offense but if the solution to all problems with Mac "it just works" OS X is to reinstall it, I can see why potential switchers stick with Windows where this "solution" was retired 10 years ago with the introduction of System Restore.

    Thanks! I'll try those in chronological order. Not the full reinstall though, if it comes to that I'll just keep switching it off by pressing the power button for 10 seconds until the whole thing goes belly-up.

    Edit: Repairing permissions didn't work, although it did repair an awful lot of things. Booting into safe mode didn't do it either. Uninstalling Logitech Control Center, however, did the trick. Not Apple's fault, but it's depressing how sensitive the system is to less-than-perfect third party extensions.
     
  4. TEG macrumors 604

    TEG

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Location:
    Langley, Washington
    #5
    Likely it is just that the extension would not allow the system to kill it, or it was still occupying memory.

    TEG
     
  5. Samarium macrumors 6502a

    Samarium

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2008
    Location:
    @ home.
    #6
    Excuse me sir, you want a solution to your problem, I'm assisting you. If you don't agree with me, scroll down to next comment. You should be grateful that someone tries to help you.

    I'm sure that your Mini is not shutting down because of you messing with the system files or installing faulty stuff, so don't come here blaming others for your mistake. I was only providing an easy way of getting rid of your problem.
     
  6. Schtumple macrumors 601

    Schtumple

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Location:
    benkadams.com
    #7
    It's a 3rd party extension that refuses to close that does it, I get it sometimes with very large applications, ones that are accessing large amounts of files, or files that are in constant use, even during shutdown.

    Are you sure the Logitech Control Centre is Leopard compatible? or that you've got the latest version? Could have been fixed in a new version.

    EDIT: actually Samarium, the OP had a very valid point, you shouldn't need to reinstall the entire OS just to solve a simple problem like that, it would be like saying buy a new mac because the F key broke on your keyboard...
     
  7. Samarium macrumors 6502a

    Samarium

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2008
    Location:
    @ home.
    #8
    A simple problem like that? Your Mac isn't shutting down how it should! Archive and Install fix the vastly majority of the issues. As I stated in my last comment:
     
  8. Schtumple macrumors 601

    Schtumple

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Location:
    benkadams.com
    #9
    But archive and install (atleast on my machine) takes up to 2 hours, depending on the amount of files that you have, where as the simple choice of repairing permissions and doing some DIY troubleshooting can take 10 minutes or so...

    Plus your attitude stunk in your reply to be honest... but there we go. I'll leave it there...
     
  9. Anuba thread starter macrumors 68040

    Anuba

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2005
    #10
    Yes, and I am grateful, but pretty much anyone realizes that reinstalling the entire OS will eliminate the problem. The whole point of asking for advice is to avoid this last resort.

    Also, wouldn't you agree that archive/reinstall is an extremely primitive and time-consuming approach? Does replacing GB:s of data because a couple of bytes are screwed up strike you as a practical solution in line with Apple's "it just works" philosophy? It's more like looking in the manual for your new Rolls-Royce and finding "if your Rolls-Royce doesn't start, simply take out the engine, put it back and try starting again."

    Macs are marketed under the pretense that they will be the end of all computer troubles, yet of all the time I've spent troubleshooting computers over the last year, 25% has been Vista troubles and the remaining 75% has involved tracking down strange voodoo issues with Leopard.

    IMHO this files under constructive criticism of OS X. I'm not after its head or anything, I'm just saying that a system that's touted as so incredibly much more stable, solid and generally superior to Windows should be harder to break and easier to fix than this. Sure, Windows is crap in a lot of ways but it's certainly not this easy to break. It was, once upon a time (Win95/98), but it's been reinforced over the years to the point where it's very hard to bring it down with 3rd party stuff -- and if you still manage somehow, you can revert to a previous restore point. With OS X you can get all sorts of problems like hangs, freezes, perpetual blue screens etc due to some hardware driver or fairly innocent 3rd party extension, be it DivX, ShapeShifter or Logitech Control Center.

    Again -- this is constructive criticism, not bashing or gloating. I want OS X to be be superior to Windows in every way, not merely in some ways.

    Yeah, it was a new version... I downloaded it a few days ago. I have this MX Air mouse that you can use in mid air, and I figured I could use it on my Mac Mini (which I use as a glorified Apple TV plugged into my LCD TV) because I'm getting a little tired of trying to find a flat surface for the BT Mighty Mouse. Unfortunately the MX Air is useless without LCC because I can't customize its myriad of buttons. I was going to buy the new Logitech DiNovo Edge for Mac (I have it for my PC and it's fantastic), but I'm putting that off for now.

    Anyway, thanks for the suggestions, they indirectly made me realize that LCC might be the culprit.
     
  10. r0k macrumors 68040

    r0k

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Location:
    Detroit
    #11
    A "Winema" is the process of backing up, beltsanding, formatting, typing key numbers and reinstalling Windows.

    An Archive and Install is a largely unattended process that will very likely leave the screen looking exactly like it did before you began. I did this on my Mac Mini. I went from Tiger to Leopard by inserting the CD and picking "archive and install". I came back 90 minutes later to see the screen looking just like I left it, down to the applications I had open at the time. I assumed the install had gone belly up until I checked About this Mac and found I had indeed gone from 10.3.9 to 10.5.2 with no muss and no fuss. I think a lot of users avoid Archive and Install because of phobias brought on by wasted hours (months? years?) installing Windows.

    I agree in principle that fixing something broken should not require reinstalling the OS. But I disagree that reinstalling OS X is a huge burden. It is not. I have done it twice. Once to get my G4 Mini up to Leopard. Once when my daughter got her Intel Mini all futzed up and it was having kernel panics. Both times it was relatively painless. Both machines have worked flawlessly ever since.

    Another thing to try before the reinstall: Onyx. Let Onyx take a crack at cleaning things up.
     

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