Greg T

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 7, 2017
3
0
I'm new to all this so bear with me. :)
Tried to install update but now my MacBook cycles through these two screenshots (when I press enter) until eventually showing a grey no entry sign. Can't log in :(

Has anyone got a solution from viewing the screen shots?
My son has an iMac with original Mavericks usb boot stick, however I don't. My MacBook is 2012 I think, but as a light user I do not want to give up on it.
 

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Mike Boreham

macrumors 68020
Aug 10, 2006
2,387
740
UK
I'm new to all this so bear with me. :)
Tried to install update but now my MacBook cycles through these two screenshots (when I press enter) until eventually showing a grey no entry sign. Can't log in :(

Has anyone got a solution from viewing the screen shots?
My son has an iMac with original Mavericks usb boot stick, however I don't. My MacBook is 2012 I think, but as a light user I do not want to give up on it.

That is a classic kernel panic, and a bit of googling on the backtrace words finds the same but doesn't find any clear cut cause. This was prob the most relevant.

Can you clarify were you already running High Sierra, and this happened updating to 10.13.2.? or was this after updating to High Sierra for first time?

Can you boot to the Recovery Partition (restart holding cmd+R) then try running Disk Utility to repair the internal?
 
Last edited:

Greg T

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 7, 2017
3
0
That is a classic kernel panic, and a bit of googling on the backtrace words finds the same but doesn't find any clear cut cause. This was prob the most relevant.

Can you clarify were you already running High Sierra, and this happened updating to 10.13.2.? or was this after updating to High Sierra for first time?

Can you boot to the Recovery Partition (restart holding cmd+R) then try running Disk Utility to repair the internal?

Thanks for your reply Mike,

It was after updating for the first time.

Regarding: "Can you boot to the Recovery Partition (restart holding cmd+R) then try running Disk Utility to repair the internal?"
... i'm a bit thick...
how do I run the disc utility and repair the internal?

Thanks.
 

Mike Boreham

macrumors 68020
Aug 10, 2006
2,387
740
UK
Thanks for your reply Mike,

It was after updating for the first time.

Regarding: "Can you boot to the Recovery Partition (restart holding cmd+R) then try running Disk Utility to repair the internal?"
... i'm a bit thick...
how do I run the disc utility and repair the internal?

Thanks.

Thinking some more there is a possibility that the problem is the hard disk is beginning to fail. If this the case the priority should be to try and copy your data off it as quickly as possible before trying to repair it....unless you already have a recent backup? The advice in the link I gave is sound. You need to boot from another external volume (drive or USB stick) and copy data from your internal to another external.

If you don't have a backup already, and the data is important, I would actually recommend going to a Mac Repair shop and letting them look at it. They will already have bootable externals to enable recovering data off your drive. There are risks with me or others advising what to do from afar without being able see the whole picture, and there are dangers that the advice might make things worse, eg trying to repair the disk if it is actually failing.

If you do have a solid backup, then you can go ahead and run Disk Utility from the Recovery Partition as described here. That link is a bit old but still relevant. Having a trustworthy backup (or two) is a huge peace of mind factor when things go wrong and you have to do things outside your comfort zone! If it all goes pear-shaped you can start all over.
 

Greg T

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 7, 2017
3
0
Thinking some more there is a possibility that the problem is the hard disk is beginning to fail. If this the case the priority should be to try and copy your data off it as quickly as possible before trying to repair it....unless you already have a recent backup? The advice in the link I gave is sound. You need to boot from another external volume (drive or USB stick) and copy data from your internal to another external.

If you don't have a backup already, and the data is important, I would actually recommend going to a Mac Repair shop and letting them look at it. They will already have bootable externals to enable recovering data off your drive. There are risks with me or others advising what to do from afar without being able see the whole picture, and there are dangers that the advice might make things worse, eg trying to repair the disk if it is actually failing.

If you do have a solid backup, then you can go ahead and run Disk Utility from the Recovery Partition as described here. That link is a bit old but still relevant. Having a trustworthy backup (or two) is a huge peace of mind factor when things go wrong and you have to do things outside your comfort zone! If it all goes pear-shaped you can start all over.


Thank you! I have a time machine backup on ext HD. I will let you know how I get on. :)
 
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