Mac OS Leopard won't boot

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by dannysantos, Apr 14, 2008.

  1. dannysantos, Apr 14, 2008
    Last edited: May 8, 2012
  2. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #2
    I don't entirely understand your question, but I would like to know if the Mac booted after Disk Warrior repaired the hard drive. And you're saying Windows is still booting from another partition?
     
  3. dannysantos, Apr 15, 2008
    Last edited: May 8, 2012

    dannysantos thread starter macrumors newbie

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  4. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #4
    This is a strange one. Obviously your Mac partition is hosed but the Windows partition is okay. Stranger yet is the (successful?) DiskWarrior repair which doesn't seem to stick. I'm at a loss to explain how this could happen.

    Do you have any peripherals connected to your Mac? You could also Spotlight your panic.log and post it here, if you can get OSX to boot.
     
  5. merl1n macrumors 65816

    merl1n

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    #5
    What does the console and system logs report? Can you post them so we can get a handle on what is going on?

    I would do a "Safe boot" to clear out the system caches and run a file system check/repair. Note that this type of boot takes much longer (could take 5 - 10 minutes) before a login window appears with "safe boot enabled" in red. At this stage hit the "go back" arrow and restart the system.
     
  6. dannysantos, Apr 15, 2008
    Last edited: May 8, 2012

    dannysantos thread starter macrumors newbie

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  7. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #7
    I'm not sure a reinstall of OSX is going to help, as the problem seems to be related to the disk partition itself, not the OS. Yours is one of the more unusual problems I've seen recently. I'd like to hear from someone who is more familiar than I am with how directories are handled on hard disk partitions.
     
  8. dannysantos, Apr 15, 2008
    Last edited: May 8, 2012

    dannysantos thread starter macrumors newbie

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  9. GimmeSlack12 macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

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    #9
    Delete MSN. Reinstall MSN or get Adium.
    This might only be the tip of the iceberg though, might have to uninstall and reinstall Office 08, or possibly Archive and Install Leopard.
     
  10. dannysantos, Apr 15, 2008
    Last edited: May 8, 2012

    dannysantos thread starter macrumors newbie

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  11. merl1n macrumors 65816

    merl1n

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    #11
    Snippet From Wikpedia (easier than trying to explain it myself)

    HFS Plus volumes are divided into sectors (called logical blocks in HFS), that are usually 512 bytes in size. These sectors are then grouped together into allocation blocks which can contain one or more sectors; the number of allocation blocks depends on the total size of the volume. HFS Plus uses a larger value to address allocation blocks than HFS, 32 bits rather than 16 bits; this means it can access 4,294,967,296 (=232) allocation blocks rather than the 65,536 (=216) allocation blocks available to HFS.[1]

    Typically an HFS Plus volume is embedded inside an HFS Wrapper, although this is becoming less prevalent. The wrapper was designed for two purposes; it allowed Macintosh computers without HFS Plus support in their ROM to boot HFS Plus volumes and it also was designed to help users transition to HFS Plus by including a minimal, bootable HFS volume with a read-only file called Where_have_all_my_files_gone?, explaining to users with versions of the Mac OS without HFS Plus, that the volume requires a system with HFS Plus support. The original HFS volume contains a signature and an offset to the embedded HFS Plus volume within its volume header.

    All allocation blocks in the HFS volume which contain the embedded volume are mapped out of the HFS allocation file as bad blocks.[1]

    There are nine structures that make up a typical HFS Plus volume:[1]
    Sectors 0 and 1 of the volume are HFS boot blocks. These are identical to the boot blocks in an HFS volume. They are part of the HFS wrapper.

    Sector 2 contains the Volume Header equivalent to the Master Directory Block in an HFS volume. The Volume Header stores a wide variety of data about the volume itself, for example the size of allocation blocks, a timestamp that indicates when the volume was created or the location of other volume structures such as the Catalog File or Extent Overflow File. The Volume Header is always located in the same place.

    The Allocation File which keeps track of which allocation blocks are free and which are in use. It is similar to the Volume Bitmap in HFS, each allocation block is represented by one bit. A zero means the block is free and a one means the block is in use. The main difference with the HFS Volume Bitmap, is that the Allocation File is stored as a regular file, it does not occupy a special reserved space near the beginning of the volume. The Allocation File can also change size and does not have to be stored contiguously within a volume.

    The Catalog File is a B*-tree that contains records for all the files and directories stored in the volume. The HFS Plus Catalog File is very similar to the HFS Catalog File, the main differences being records are larger to allow more fields and to allow for those fields to be larger (for example to allow the longer 255-character unicode file names in HFS Plus). A record in the HFS Catalog File is 512 bytes in size, a record in the HFS Plus Catalog File is 4KB in Mac OS and 8KB in Mac OS X. Fields in HFS are of fixed size, in HFS Plus the size can vary depending on the actual size of the data they store.

    The Extents Overflow File is another B*-tree that records the allocation blocks that are allocated to each file as extents. Each file record in the Catalog File is capable of recording eight extents for each fork of a file; once those are used extents are recorded in the Extents Overflow File. Bad blocks are also recorded as extents in the Extents Overflow File. The default size of an extent record in Mac OS is 1 KB and 4 KB in Mac OS X.

    The Attributes File is a new B*-tree in HFS Plus that does not have a corresponding structure in HFS. The Attributes File can store three different types of 4 KB records: Inline Data Attribute records, Fork Data Attribute records and Extension Attribute records. Inline Data Attribute records store small attributes that can fit within the record itself. Fork Data Attribute records contain references to a maximum of eight extents that can hold larger attributes. Extension Attributes are used to extend a Fork Data Attribute record when its eight extent records are already used.

    The Startup File is designed for non-Mac OS systems that don't have HFS or HFS Plus support. It is similar to the Boot Blocks of an HFS volume.

    The second to last sector contains the Alternate Volume Header equivalent to the Alternate Master Directory Block of HFS.

    The last sector in the volume is reserved for use by Apple. It is used during the computer manufacturing process.
     
  12. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #12
    I don't see how a kernel panic could be related to Office components that reside in the Applications directory. At worst, they'd cause Office to crash. DiskWarrior does give you a recovery option, does it not?

    Thanks, this is interesting... but how does it help solve the problem? (Maybe I missed something?)
     
  13. GimmeSlack12 macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

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    #13
    My bad. But I agree with IJ that a non-system program to cause such issues.
     
  14. dannysantos, Apr 15, 2008
    Last edited: May 8, 2012

    dannysantos thread starter macrumors newbie

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  15. merl1n macrumors 65816

    merl1n

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    #15
    I was responding to your question about how directories are handled. This does not fix his issue. It was only meant to be informational and answer your request.

    Also from the disk warrior report the only error I see that could affect him is

    "permissions:
    Error detected (-9997) while verifying / repairing permissions disk disk0s2 Machintosh HD"

    The other errors are inconsequential.

    And I repeat, after permissions are repaired, do a "SAFE BOOT" so that the system can check and fix the file system.

    I would not use Disk Warrior to do this, but use the install disk DVD and boot from that. From there (without doing an install) run Disk Utility and repair permissions on the disk.
     
  16. merl1n macrumors 65816

    merl1n

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    #16

    Sorry things got a little backwards when I edited my post.

    Repair permissions first via the install DVD and "SAFE BOOT" after that.
     
  17. dannysantos, Apr 15, 2008
    Last edited: May 8, 2012

    dannysantos thread starter macrumors newbie

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  18. merl1n macrumors 65816

    merl1n

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    #18
    What happens when you try to boot in "Safe Mode"? How long are you waiting?

    Safe boot can take considerable time especially if there is major file system corruption. Sometimes 5 - 15 minutes.

    You could try booting into "Single User Mode". Power on and hold down cmd-s or v keys (v is verbose). This will put you into single user mode as the root user. You can then run fsck to make repairs.

    To use fsck, you must run it from the command line. Unlike using your mouse to open an application to do something, you'll need to type a text command at the prompt (#) to tell fsck what to do.

    To use fsck:

    At the command-line prompt, type /sbin/fsck -fy
    Press Return.

    fsck will go through five "phases" and then return information about your disk's use and fragmentation. Once it finishes, it'll display this message if no issue is found:

    ** The volume (name_of_volume) appears to be OK

    If fsck found issues and has altered, repaired, or fixed anything, it will display this message:
    ***** FILE SYSTEM WAS MODIFIED *****

    Important: If this message appears, repeat the fsck command you typed in step 2 until fsck tells you that your volume appears to be OK (first-pass repairs may uncover additional issues, so this is a normal thing to do).

    When fsck reports that your volume is OK, type reboot at the prompt and then press Return.

    If this still doesn't fix your problem, you are "hosed" and your only recourse is an "Archive and Install".
     
  19. dannysantos, Apr 15, 2008
    Last edited: May 8, 2012

    dannysantos thread starter macrumors newbie

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  20. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #20
    Good luck, but I'm pretty certain that archive and install will not help since the problem appears to be in the disk directory.
     
  21. dannysantos, Apr 15, 2008
    Last edited: May 8, 2012

    dannysantos thread starter macrumors newbie

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  22. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #22
    I don't really know to be honest. I'm pretty sure an archive and install won't help since the problem appears to be with the partition's directory and DiskWarrior seems to be powerless to help, which is unusual.
     
  23. yashrg macrumors regular

    yashrg

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    #24
    I have had something similar. In single user mode, I get a lot of crashreporter messages successively. Did anyone find a solution?
     

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