Mac Pro 2008 SSD

alexandroszou

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2018
5
0
Hello there.
I own a Mac Pro 2008 2x quad-core at 2.8 running sierra (patched).
I'm planing adding an ssd drive.
Anybody has any suggestions?
 

Ph.D.

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2014
548
465
Hello there.
I own a Mac Pro 2008 2x quad-core at 2.8 running sierra (patched).
I'm planing adding an ssd drive.
Anybody has any suggestions?
Two top-tier suggestions for the drive would be:

* Samsung 860 Evo.
* Crucial MX-500

However, the 2008 Mac Pro will not be able to use these drives at anywhere near their full speed when using the normal sleds. This is a strict hardware limitation. Therefore, even the most modest drives will be more than adequate, speed wise (data safety may be a different issue). A faster alternative would be to RAID-0 two drives, but this is still a waste as you won't get the full speed of two RAIDed drives either. I personally can not recommend SSD RAIDs (RAID 0) in this application due to some severe problems I eventually had in my old 2008.

You will need an appropriate 2.5" to 3.5" adapter. There are a lot of other options for this. In the alternative, I hear some people just slip the drive into the slot and securely tape it in.

Regardless of the inability to use full SSD speeds, you will find it to be a good upgrade.
 
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alexandroszou

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2018
5
0
Do you think that choosing a Western Digital Black 1TB running at 7200/rpm will be a better choice?
 

AidenShaw

macrumors P6
Feb 8, 2003
18,641
4,643
The Peninsula
Do you think that choosing a Western Digital Black 1TB running at 7200/rpm will be a better choice?
If you need 1 TB and your budget can't handle a 1TB SSD - it could be.

The SSD will be much faster all around, but costs more per GB.

Perhaps both - a 1TB WD Green goes for around $50 dollars, and you could get a smaller SSD for the system and apps. A 250 GB 860 EVO is around $80.

A lot of it depends on what you're doing. Do you need fast read/write to big data, or is a fast system/app drive and slower big disk reasonable?

Don't depend too much on the BlackMagic/AJA disk tests frequently mentioned here. Those measure large sequential transfers - useful if you need to read/write huge video files in real time, but not so useful for loads that hit lots of smaller files.
 
Last edited:

haralds

macrumors 65816
Jan 3, 2014
1,225
372
Silicon Valley, CA
If you need 1 TB and your budget can't handle a 1TB SSD - it could be.

The SSD will be much faster all around, but costs more per GB.

Perhaps both - a 1TB WD Green goes for around $50 dollars, and you could get a smaller SSD for the system and apps. A 250 GB 860 EVO is around $80.

A lot of it depends on what you're doing. Do you need fast read/write to big data, or is a fast system/app drive and slower big disk reasonable?

Don't depend too much on the BlackMagic/AJA disk tests frequently mentioned here. Those measure large sequential transfers - useful if you need to read/write huge video files in real time, but not so useful for loads that hit lots of smaller files.
The 3,1 I have set up for my wife is running a custom Fusion drive configuration which gives you pretty much the SSD performance in real life with the economy of a larger drive. It has been stable with a 2TB spinning drive and a 250GB SSD.
I do not think the slower SATA speeds of the 3,1 have that much of an impact in real use. The overall performance improvement of an SSD is stunning.
 

dcpmark

macrumors 6502a
Oct 20, 2009
959
742
Hello there.
I own a Mac Pro 2008 2x quad-core at 2.8 running sierra (patched).
I'm planing adding an ssd drive.
Anybody has any suggestions?
I have had an Apricorn Velocity Solo x1 Sata III adapter and a 1TB Samsung 850 Evo in my 2008 Mac Pro since 2014, and it’s been fantastic.
 
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Jonathan50

macrumors member
Mar 30, 2017
62
29
Personally I prefer 3.5 inch mechanical hard drives. The 3,1 is a computer that starts, reboots or shuts down slower than others anyway. After the novelty of a slightly faster boot with an ssd has faded you are left with having a makeshift physical support for an ssd in bay #1, above the fan cage, unless you want to wait a few weeks for a thingie to adapt it to a drawer. With modern 7200 rpm and large buffer WD & Seagate hard disks, you get ample space, reliability and once the operating system has started, not much of a difference in system response. Just my thoughts. The choice is yours, of course.
 
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