Mac pro core 8 or core 12?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by avhiroop, Feb 9, 2011.

  1. avhiroop macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    #1
    Hi.. I want to setup a mac pro with FCP for my edits.. which setup should I buy core 8 or core 12?.. pls help and also tell me as to why i should the particular setup.. thanks..
     
  2. Desmo1098 macrumors regular

    Desmo1098

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2009
    #2
    Hi,

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  3. gameface macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #3
    A 4-core. FCP doesn't support multiprocessing. I can edit the same timeline on a mini that I can on my MP. The MP offers me the ability to use my capture card and esata cards but for strict editing, you will see 100% no difference between a new 4-core, 8-core or 12-core. Only caveat is during rendering, but seriously, how often are you rendering during an NLE session. If your answer is over 5% of the time, you're doing it wrong. If it is strictly an editing machine, save the money on a 4-core, get an esata card and an esata raid. That will make more difference than cores. Ohh, and more ram too.
     
  4. highdefw macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    #4
    Final Cut update expected soon. Should keep that in mind...
     
  5. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #5
    If you're constantly encoding high-res video with Compressor (like I do on a daily basis), there are significant advantages to having an 8- or 12-core. But I suppose it really depends on how involved the OP's workflow really is (he/she wasn't very specific). But I do know a lot of off-line editors that work just fine on older quad-cores with fast disks.
     
  6. gameface macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #6
    Exactly... and for cost value, getting a hardware encoder would be more beneficial than a bigger MP IMHO. I do a lot of exports for web h264. Quality doesn't matter but speed does and the $100 El Gate turbo h264 has made me so much money since I have owned it I can't even explain. Having that is WAY faster than a faster MP using Compressor, although quality is reduced, but time/cost/value is a major point for me as a freelancer and it is a nifty little tool.

    If I continue to do more 5d MKII and 7D work I will be looking to buy a card that does ProRes transcoding, hardware based to speed my workflow. But, for straight cutting as the OP mentioned (maybe inappropriately) you have to agree he won't see much, if any, speed increase in his daily cutting.
     
  7. CaptainChunk, Feb 11, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2011

    CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #7
    Well, I do a lot of narrative work, where I'm often dealing with camera systems like the RED One. I need all the crunching power I can get for that, even with a RED Rocket accelerator (which really only accelerates debayering; you still need CPU power for the actual encoding).

    AJA's Io HD box has hardware ProRes acceleration. It's expensive, though (about $3500). Unless you can utilize the vast array of professional I/O (like SDI) connections it has, it's an awful lot of money to spend to accelerate a codec that multicore machines can crunch with respectable speed.
     
  8. gameface macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #8
    For RED I can completely agree with you.

    BTW... how's the industry out there right now? I had a good senior editor move out to LA dn is having a bitch of a time finding work without knowing anyone. Work here in Boston is slow but NY seems to be pumping. Moving to NYC may seem to be in my immediate future.

    Sorry for the sidetrack OP!
     
  9. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #9
    The industry? Between crummy and decent right now. The initial move to LA is hard on practically everyone. It can take several months and sometimes over a year to start landing decent gigs...and of course, you never feel you're getting paid enough. The best thing to tell your friend is to not let himself get discouraged. There's thousands of freelance editors in LA and in a sense, he's competing with all of them for work.

    Working in any major market is all about networking and marketing yourself - and even that doesn't guarantee jobs. A lot of the time, new-to-market editors have to take jobs as post PAs and loggers and work up the chain into junior positions like assistant editor before they start landing actual editing positions.
     

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