Mac Pro: How big of a surge protector is needed?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by cydspal, Feb 4, 2008.

  1. cydspal macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2007
    #1
    I have a new quad core 2.8 being built (ya!) and can't seem to get a good answer on how powerful of a power backup / surge protector I will need. I don't won't to skimp on a $3k box (and a new monitor) but do I really a $200 model such as this one?

    APC Back-UPS RS 1500 LCD 1500VA 8 Outlet BR1500LCD - $200

    I have a APC 500 on my current PC and it has always worked fine, is it time to bite the bullet and upgrade for the Mac Daddy? Thanks!
     
  2. CJRhoades macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2007
    Location:
    Lafayette, IN
    #2
    I have a cheaper model of the APC you were talking about and it has my Mac Pro, 30" ACD, Printer, Cambridge SoundWorks audio system, TiBook, MBP, and Airport all plugged into it.

    It seems to be working ok.
     
  3. Jebaloo macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    #3
    I see a lot of people asking about this. Power backups, etc. Where I live, I can't remember the last time our power was cut off, I think maybe back in the 90s. Why is it, out of interest, that you feel you need this sort of protection? Is it because you think a fuse might blow in your house? (Sorry if I"m missing something obvious).
     
  4. smogsy macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    #4
    most power cuts you dont notice but can affect your hardware if you get powercut it can take out your whole Mac.

    or even power surge ive seen it happen but atm i do not have 1 will be getting one soon.
     
  5. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    Georgia
    #5
    It is also the area you live in. When I lived in Sacramento, CA the power went out maybe once a year but I moved just outside of Atlanta, GA last November and have experienced 6 or 7 blackouts. Maybe it is time for Georgia to catch up with the 70's and start running their power cables underground.
     
  6. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Location:
    In a Hell predominately of my own making
    #6
    Go to the APC website, they have a configurator (fairly Mac-oriented, too). Also, never plug printers (or any other high-load, non system critical accessory) into the backup side of a UPS, only the filtered side (if provided). The UPS is designed only to provide a graceful shutdown period.
     
  7. mperkins37 macrumors 6502a

    mperkins37

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2007
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #7
    I have the Frys Electronics 80 or 90 dollar APC, with 4 Battery Backups/Surge , 3 Surge on the other side.
    It also has ethernet surge, & shutdown software that comes with it (Mac & PC).
    We live in Arizona & can count on a storm or 2 a year that takes the power out.
    We have had people hit power poles & take the power out also.
    Bottom line is it's better to have protection than to come home to a Fried MacPro Motherboard.
    Consider it cheap insurance.
    As far as how big an APC to get, Add up all your plugs you want protected with Battery backup, & let that guide you, (You can also plug in a strip surge protector into a battery backup plug to get extra plug spaces if budget dictates a cheaper model with fewer protected plug ins.
     
  8. treehorn macrumors 6502

    treehorn

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2007
    #8
    Because I live and work in New York City. My apartment dates from the 20s and when (if) they rewired it, 90% of the power is on one circuit, so often times in the summer it will trip due to A/C usage.

    Also happens at work, so...

    a battery back up is the smart way to avoid having to re-render/process something (not to mention saving the computers from the 'shock' of a sudden outage). Those 10 minutes can be life saving (for the machine and for a project)
     
  9. Jebaloo macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    #9
    Yeh, after you guys started explaining it makes lots of sense now. My flat's from the 1830's, so the electrics are about as old as electrics get. Horse hair and cow dung for insulation and all that (wall insulation, not electrical! Although, you never know ;)

    Sometimes if a bulb goes, the electrics go too. Although the emergency lights come on, so I don't actually know if the plugs stop working. I think I'm going to look into a sub £50 version, just for safety. Thanks for the explanations.
     

Share This Page