Mac Pro "shrieks" like smoke alarm / eSATA

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by kirkbross, Jul 5, 2012.

  1. kirkbross macrumors 6502a

    kirkbross

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #1
    I have two SATA drives in a JBOD enclosure connected to an eSATA PCI card in my e2008 Mac Pro running Lion.

    I can eject either or both of these external drives fine, but if I power off the JBOD enclosure while the Mac Pro is still on, the Mac Pro squeals super loud like a smoke alarm. It's a sound I didn't even know a Mac could make -- a loud, piercing shriek.

    Any clues as to what the sound is? I suppose it could be the eSATA PCI card making the sound... but it seems odd that a tiny PCI card would have the ability to generate a sound.
     
  2. goMac macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2004
    #2
    I don't think you're supposed to hot swap eSATA on Mac OS X. Pretty sure you're supposed to shut down and then make any drive changes. But I don't own any eSATA gear.

    Not sure why that would make your machine shriek though. It should just be a driver thing.
     
  3. ScottishCaptain macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    #3
    What sort of eSATA PCI card do you have?

    If you look on your eSATA PCI card, does it have a small black cylinder on it with a round hole in the top?

    The Mac Pro lacks the piezoelectric speaker required to make this sort of squealing. A lot of PCI-e eSATA RAID cards come with one of those built into the PCB (it looks like that black cylinder described above) for an alarm function when something goes direly wrong.

    It is likely that your eSATA card is making this noise. There might be software that you can use to disable the alarm, but I don't think it's the Mac Pro... The MP has no reason to make such a noise, and if it did it would sound more like a hearty beep then a smoke alarm because the Mac Pro only has a speaker built-in, and it can't make that sort of noise.

    -SC
     
  4. flatfoot macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    #4
    That.

    If it's a HighPoint card, they have a browser-based configuration utility.
     
  5. pprior macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2007
    #5
    Exactly, it's the card making the noise to alert you that the drive is not functioning. It's not the mac pro itself.
    \
     
  6. kirkbross thread starter macrumors 6502a

    kirkbross

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #6
    Cool... the card is a NewerTech MAXPower eSATA 6G PCIe. I'll do some googling. Thanks.
     
  7. ScottishCaptain macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    #7
    Actually, you've got the RAID version of that card. The normal version doesn't have the alarm on it- the RAID version does. You can see the piezo speaker on the top right-hand corner of the PCB in the manual below...

    http://www.newertech.com/downloads/maxpoweresataraid6gmanual0610.pdf

    From the same document:

    You'll need to download the drivers from here:

    http://www.newertech.com/support

    Specifically, the "MAXPower eSATA 6G PCIe 2.0 RAID Card Drivers (OS X)" package. Once you install those, follow the instructions in the manual to get into the configuration interface and from there you can disable the alarm (or use their utility to properly "unplug" the array and prevent the alarm from sounding).

    -SC
     
  8. kirkbross thread starter macrumors 6502a

    kirkbross

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles
  9. akadmon macrumors 68010

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Location:
    New England
    #9
    My thanks to ScottishCaptain also!

    I lived with this problem for the past year and a half, and now I'm finally able to enjoy some peace and quiet :) My solution before was to put the MP in sleep mode and wake it.
     
  10. kirkbross thread starter macrumors 6502a

    kirkbross

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #10
    I just used the browser interface and disabled the alarm altogether.

    I do wonder what it's there for though... perhaps it would be handy in a server room if you needed to quickly locate a problem drive.
     

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