Mac Pro won't connect to WiFi

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Jethro!, Jun 13, 2017.

  1. Jethro! macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2015
    #1
    My 2009 Mac Pro (running 10.8.5) simply won't connect to a WiFi network. However, my iPad in the same room can connect to it no problem. (It's an xfinity hotspot). The Mac Pro can see the network, I can select it, but it simply won't connect.

    Any thoughts as to why the iPad connects but the MP won't?
     
  2. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Location:
    Between the coasts
    #2
    Any number of possible reasons. Have you tried restarting the hotspot? You may need to refresh the Mac's DHCP lease (Network Preferences > Advanced > TCP/IP). It may be that the hotspot has limits on the number of devices that can connect to the network, and you're over the limit... All guesswork, which is not a substitute for systematic troubleshooting. Try using Network Diagnostics (Network Preferences > Assist me... > Diagnostics).
     
  3. Jethro! thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 4, 2015
    #3
    I can't restart the hotspot. It's a 'public' Xfinity connection.
    I tried your other suggestions, but none worked. I did find something that indicates these Xfinity hotspots only work with iOS devices, which is somewhat odd. I guess that they can detect the type of device trying to connect and deny a connection if not on a "mobile" device?
     
  4. jamespatten macrumors newbie

    jamespatten

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2017
    #4
    if your Iphone or mobile device is able to create hotspots I would try link it to this first. let me know if it doesnt work we can try something else :)
     
  5. pat500000 macrumors G3

    pat500000

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    Jun 3, 2015
    #5
    Maybe..........just maybe the Mac isn't so pro anymore...
     
  6. Jethro! thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 4, 2015
    #6
    I don't believe an iPad can create a hotspot from a wifi connection, can it?
    --- Post Merged, Jun 15, 2017 ---
    ^ There you have it. ^
    Though my 2009 Mac Pro is from the days when it actually had pro characteristics. Things like, I dunno… easy upgradability, multiple drive bays, multiple optical bays, PCI slots, lots of different kinds of connections (USB AND Firewire AND optical…). How wacky to think that some people don't care about how slim and small it is!
     
  7. jamespatten macrumors newbie

    jamespatten

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2017
    #7
    Correct you can’t hotspot a Wi-Fi unfortunately but what you can do is make a personal hotspot on a iOS device which has mobile data options, this should work with other devices like android also if you have a none apple device

    All you then need to do is see if it connects to the phone! If it doesn’t there is something else we can try
     
  8. Jethro! thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 4, 2015
    #8
    I don't have any iOS devices with mobile data options.

    One thought… if Xfinity is hobbling their WiFi by detecting the type of device connecting to it and if not a "mobile" device denying the connection -- perhaps I could use a WiFi extender to grab the signal then rebroadcast to a MacOS-friendly device..? The "Xfinity device guardian" shouldn't be able to see the type of device on the other end of the extender, I think..?
     
  9. dwig macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2015
    Location:
    Key West FL
    #9
    What WiFi card is in your MacPro? What WiFi types (a,b,g,n,ac) on what frequencies (2.4ghz, 5ghz) does your router use?

    1. The antique MacPro "early 2009" 4.1 did not have built-in WiFi, though they were often sold as build-to-order with the optional Apple AirPort card, which supports b, g, & n at 2.4ghz. Apple's card could also be added later, as could 3rd party cards.
    2. There must be some common ground between the WiFi type and frequency supported by your computer and those supported and enabled on your router. Disabling the older, slower WiFi types is not uncommon as it can will improve the speeds seen by newer devices.
     
  10. Jethro! thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 4, 2015
    #10
    dwig, this is an Xfinity hotspot. I have no direct access to the router. The WiFi card in the MP is the AirPort Extreme 802.11n Wi-Fi wireless networking card;2 IEEE 802.11a/b/g compatible. It sees the Xfinity network no problem and can even connect to it. Signal strength is strong. It just won't get a valid IP address (says it's a self-assigned IP). Same problem trying to connect via a Macbook Pro. And same problem again trying to connect via an iMac. The common factor appears to be Mac OS (instead of iOS).

    p.s. That "antique" Mac Pro is still kicking butt and doing a better job at it than a trash can MP could ever hope to.
     
  11. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

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    #11
    You keep leaking out new, important info. This is a key statement:
    . You've had us scratching our heads as if it's restricted to a specific PC, rather than behaving consistently towards any PC to which you have access.

    Let's assume that the Xfinity public hotspot does discriminate between device types (routers certainly can identify the types of devices that connect, and can be set to reject inappropriate connections). After all, it's in Xfinity's interest to do so - those hotspots exist to serve Xfinity's customers when they're away from their home network. It's not there to replace a home or office network. If the hotspot's neighbors permanently latch onto it, how much bandwidth might be left for transient Xfinity customers? It likely would reject a range extender, just as it would a PC, regardless of what OS that PC runs, and I'd expect you'd have a tough time connecting a wifi printer. One can argue that the hotspot should allow use by PCs while they're in true mobile use, but how would they make that distinction?

    Overall, I think you have to adapt to the notion that Xfinity doesn't want you to use their hotspot in the manner you wish, and they're smart enough that they're not going to leave any gaping loopholes.
     
  12. Jethro! thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 4, 2015
    #12
    I did point out earlier that Xfinity did make a "system requirement" limiting hotspot access to iOS devices only (though I can't recall where I read it).

    Xfinity has made clear that they've built headroom into their bandwidth to accommodate the hotspots (which they have "volunteered" their customers into supporting, which also implies they could give customers more bandwidth, but they're not). So I'm not too sad for Xfinity.

    Perhaps, though "Where there's a will, there's a way".
     
  13. nigelbb macrumors 65816

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    Dec 22, 2012
    #13
    Why would you want to connect a Mac Pro by WiFi when it has two perfectly good Gigabit Ethernet sockets?
     
  14. Jethro! thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 4, 2015
    #14
    Because I'm trying to connect to an Xfinity hotspot. No physical access to the router.
     
  15. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

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    Aug 28, 2012
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    #15
    Sometimes it pays to read the "manual." Currently, Xfinity's secure hotspots are accessible by Macs running OS X 10.7 and higher (Windows 7 or higher, iOS 7 or higher, Android 4.3 or higher). Other device types are not supported (that presumably includes range extenders). They're not quite as clear about their unsecured hotspots, but there's no indication that there's a blanket ban on either Macs or Windows PCs.

    However, between their support pages and TOS, it's clear that only Xfinity customers can automatically log in - others have to go through a login web page. Further, the hotspot will drop any device connection after prolonged inactivity.

    So, if you're an Xfinity customer, I suggest you contact them for support. If not, assume that they're managing their free, public network in a manner that suits their desires.
     
  16. Jethro! thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 4, 2015
    #16
    Yup, I saw that for the secured hotspots 10.7+ is supported. For the others where you should get a "captive" login page, it doesn't seem to work on Mac OS. I read somewhere (wish I could find it again) that that network may be iOS only. However, they also made clear that they provide no support whatsoever for their hotspots, so you're on your own there, customer or not.
     
  17. Jethro! thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 4, 2015
    #17
    UPDATE: Suddenly the Mac Pro is connecting to the WiFi network. One day it just connected to the network, I installed a Comcast "Profile" for the network (found in Preferences) and now it works. Takes some time to connect after startup, but it works. Strange.
     
  18. ActionableMango macrumors G3

    ActionableMango

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    #18
    This whole thread makes me really glad that I don't have a Comcast router for random people to be mooching from, especially if they are doing who-knows-what on my connection.
     
  19. flowrider macrumors 601

    flowrider

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2012
    #19
    IMHO, every member of this forum should know better than to use a generic router from an ISP. Or is that just me????

    I have CenturyLink and only use the router to get the wired signal. The wireless portion of the router is turned off. I have a well protected Linksys Router with an additional Linksys Range Extender to get a signal to the rest of the house. IOW, 2 separate networks, again both with a firewall and password protected.

    Lou
     
  20. Jethro! thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 4, 2015
    #20
    Those "random people" are Comcast customers. Comcast claims these hotspots don't detract from anyone's bandwidth. Not sure I believe them, but so they say.
     

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