Mac Trojan?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by ohrightantlers, May 21, 2012.

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  1. ohrightantlers macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    #1
    Hello. I ran two system scans with avast! on my macbook last night and both found 14 infections and 7 warnings. Here's what was found:

    [​IMG]

    I haven't done anything yet and I really don't know what to do. I've asked at a few help forums (including the avast! forum) but I haven't gotten a response. I figured it wouldn't hurt to ask in different places. Should I Repair? Delete the infected? I really don't know what to make of the warnings either.

    At this point I'm desperate because I'm really barely a novice at these things. What should I do? Has my mac been completely compromised? Is there a way to know and is there a way to fix it? Thanks :)
     
  2. betatest, May 22, 2012
    Last edited: May 23, 2012

    betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #2
    Hi

    I recommend you do a full scan with DrWeb Light for Mac.

    http://www.freedrweb.com/drweb+mac+light/

    Then you do a full scan to check if your computer is infected with any missed trojan,keyloggers with Macscan.

    http://macscan.securemac.com

    Do not install too many Antivirus in your OS. Use one software at a time to do a full scan.

    See if it catches anything...

    Quarantine it if it detected.

    Do not do any Apple Software Update yet. (What ever you do do not do any Apple Software Update)

    This is a known Java Vulnerabilities.

    Once you do a full scan. Qurantine the detected files. And Delete it.

    And do another full scan.

    Once you know that there is no virus.

    Backup all your important data to a DVD-R and burn it.

    Before you intend to reformat the harddisk (zero out) and reinstall the OSX again.

    (Before you do, make sure you have a USBThumbdrive for Mac OS X Lion, or 10.6 and iLife recovery DVD when you first bought the computer that comes with it)

    ** Take note: Java is a crossplatform, so it can infects any OS that have Java! **


    This is for BootCamp for Windows for Mac (only)
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    If you are using bootcamp with Windows on your Mac.

    Boot up to your Windows OS.

    Download,

    http://www.freedrweb.com/download+cureit+free/beta/

    Do a full scan.

    Check to see if your Windows Boot Camp have been infected.

    As usual download, Malwarebytes.

    http://www.malwarebytes.org/

    Do a full scan.

    There is one that I like to use, HitMan Pro. (optional)

    http://www.surfright.nl/en/downloads
     
  3. Mal macrumors 603

    Mal

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2002
    Location:
    Orlando
    #3
    I recommend strongly that you do the opposite of what betatest said. Do your software updates if you haven't, but you can also simply delete those files, they are Windows viruses and cannot affect your Mac. If you have a Bootcamp partition, then of course run antivirus on it, but stay far away from the links that betatest provided.

    jW
     
  4. SDub90 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Location:
    Long Island
    #4
    This. Your mac isn't infected, but those files can infect a Windows machine if you share them or load them onto a bootcamp partition.

    I don't have much else to add, just wanted to reenforce what Mal has already said.
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    Mal is right, of course. Troj/Djewers-A is a Windows trojan that cannot affect your Mac OS X installation. If you're running Windows on your Mac, you should have a Windows antivirus running, which should detect and quarantine/remove any threats.

    Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 10 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). Also, Mac OS X Snow Leopard and Lion have anti-malware protection built in, further reducing the need for 3rd party antivirus apps.
    1. Make sure your built-in Mac firewall is enabled in System Preferences > Security > Firewall

    2. Uncheck "Open "safe" files after downloading" in Safari > Preferences > General

    3. Disable Java in your browser (Safari, Chrome, Firefox). This will protect you from malware that exploits Java in your browser, including the recent Flashback trojan. Leave Java disabled until you visit a trusted site that requires it, then re-enable only for the duration of your visit to that site. (This is not to be confused with JavaScript, which you should leave enabled.)

    4. Change your DNS servers to OpenDNS servers by reading this.

    5. Be careful to only install software from trusted, reputable sites. Never install pirated software. If you're not sure about an app, ask in this forum before installing.

    6. Never let someone else have access to install anything on your Mac.

    7. Don't open files that you receive from unknown or untrusted sources.

    8. For added security, make sure all network, email, financial and other important passwords are long and complex, including upper and lower case letters, numbers and special characters.

    9. Always keep your Mac and application software updated. Use Software Update for your Mac software. For other software, it's safer to get updates from the developer's site or from the menu item "Check for updates", rather than installing from any notification window that pops up while you're surfing the web.
    That's all you need to do to keep your Mac completely free of any Mac OS X malware that has ever been released into the wild. You don't need any 3rd party software to keep your Mac secure.
     
  6. betatest, May 23, 2012
    Last edited: May 23, 2012

    betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #6

    Hi

    How do I do that on option 6???

    There are cases that someone physically access to my mac and make changes to my system.

    I even have that firmware password turn on.

    Another thing which I need to inform you guys.

    I'm not the only person who use a mac at home.

    One of brother is also using a mac.

    So either one is the main culprit.

    ----------

    I will do a full scan first, if there is no infected files. Then I will do an update.

    You should know better than me that Java is a cross platform.

    It's run in all OSes! (if you install that is)

    You install Java in Mac, Windows, Linux, BSD, Solaris etc.

    If you are infected by it. You are infected by it.

    Once you do a full scan, then if you know there aren't any infected file then you do Apple software update.

    And did you know that in fact, Apple themselves are running Norton Antivirus in their Mac OS X in their company??

    Apple stays MUM about it and did not want to tell you guys. They Denied it.

    Asked Symantec. They know better.


    Goto the Apple store in the US and check why Apple is selling Antivirus program.

    http://store.apple.com/us/product/H7310LL/A?fnode=MTY1NDA1Mw

    Go figure that one out.

    How come there is still software such as ClamAV for the Mac???

    Yeah right no viruses on a mac, but many Keyloggers! Remote control programs!

    I even run antivirus on my Linux and Solaris! LOL!

    If you have Java on your handphone. Don't tell me you are not infected?

    Then why Steve Jobs talks about Java and Adobe Flash and get pissed off by it?

    You know better than me, that last few years, there are cases in the US Schools that they install a remote program to spy on their students and and their parents sue the School for it.



    http://news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-10110852-83.html

    CNET
    News
    Security & Privacy

    Apple suggests Mac users install antivirus software

    Apple advises Mac users to install antivirus software in nod that even Mac users aren't immune to rising malware threats.
    Elinor Mills
    by Elinor Mills December 1, 2008 5:30 PM PST

    Updated 10:50 a.m. PST December 2 to correct that Apple previously recommended antivirus software to Mac users, and at 1:50 p.m. PST with call back from Apple and link to 2002 Apple anti-virus item. A follow-up blog will be posted that goes into more detail about the coverage.

    Apple is recommending that Mac users install antivirus software.

    But don't read this as an admission that the Mac operating system is suddenly insecure. It's more a recognition that Mac users are vulnerable to Web application exploits, which have replaced operating system vulnerabilities as the bigger threat to computer users.

    On November 21 Apple updated a technical note on its Support Web site that says: "Apple encourages the widespread use of multiple antivirus utilities so that virus programmers have more than one application to circumvent, thus making the whole virus writing process more difficult."

    The item offers three software suggestions: Intego VirusBarrier X5 and Symantec Norton Anti-Virus 11 for Macintosh, both available from the Apple Online Store, and McAfee VirusScan for Mac.

    MacDailyNews unearthed the same note posted by Apple in June 2007 and published it on Tuesday,a long with a link to a March 2002 note from Apple urging people to use an anti-virus program.

    Apple representatives did not respond to e-mails seeking comment on Monday, but did return a call on Tuesday. A spokesman said he would look into the matter.

    Brian Krebs, who first reported on the Apple antivirus recommendation Monday in his Security Fix blog at The Washington Post, said an Apple store employee told him he didn't need antivirus software when he purchased a MacBook three months ago.
     
  7. Mal macrumors 603

    Mal

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2002
    Location:
    Orlando
    #7
    betatest, I have zero interest in your ridiculous "facts" and speculation. If you provided any correct information, I'd probably spend a few more minutes correcting the rest, but for now I'm going to continue to simply advise everyone who reads this thread to ignore you. Please put some effort into actually making sure you're posting truth instead of false information and conspiracy theories.

    jW
     
  8. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #8
    If you can't trust them, it's your problem if you let them have access to your Mac.
    Those are easily circumvented.
    Read tip #3 in my post. If you do that, you will not be infected by any Java-based malware that exists in the wild.

    Post a link to proof of that claim.
    That's ridiculous. Of course Symantec will say whatever promotes their product.

    Apple sells a lot of 3rd party software and hardware. That doesn't mean they endorse or recommend any particular product.
    There are millions of software apps out there. Just because they exist doesn't mean they're necessary.

    Which can only be installed if you do it yourself or allow someone to install them.
    Those were installed by the schools on school-owned computers.

    http://www.infowars.com/students-to-be-spied-on-censored-with-school-issued-laptops/

    As for your other comments regarding Apple recommending antivirus, here is their statement in their own words:
    That's not a recommendation to run antivirus all the time, but rather as a specific troubleshooting procedure.

    The bottom line is that if you practice the safe computing steps I posted, you don't have to worry about infection from any Mac OS X malware that has ever existed in the wild. If you want to run antivirus, that's your choice, but it's not required to keep your Mac safe and there's no assurance it will protect you.
     
  9. betatest, May 23, 2012
    Last edited: May 23, 2012

    betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #9
    False information??? Go and read www.securemac.com!



    ----------

    [/COLOR]
    Infowars!!!! I know where it comes from. Isn't Inforwars comes from a conspiracy theories of 9/11???


    Quote:" Well where did apple get their OS X security guide from??? Everyone knows it's from the NSA!" Mac Fanboys

    Quote "Did you know that Steve Jobs hates Apple Fan Boys!" Mac Fanboys

    Quote "Who is stealing IRAQ's Sumerian artifacts in the Museum for 2012 doomsday, and send a big ship of oil tanker and steals their Black Gold???" Skulls and Bones
     
  10. betatest, May 23, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: May 24, 2012

    betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #10
    ;)
    I don't know Mal, if you said that those guys who produce antivirus programs are bogus just to get money out of you and as stated in the macrumors guide. I notice that clamxav is recommended choice to use.

    I was wondering if in the clamav search database, clamav detected for OSX viruses.

    http://clamav-du.securesites.net/cg...cgifields=case-sensitivity&.cgifields=display

    ClamAV Virus Database Search
    Search for: begins withcontainsexactregex
    Case-sensitive search: YesNo
    Search database(s): DailyMain
    Display results: DatabaseFileVirus NameSignature
    Search results:
    Code:
    daily.cvd      not-OSX.Tored                                
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-1                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-3                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-2                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-4                              
    daily.cvd      Trojan.OSX.Miner                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-6                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-7                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-17                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-18                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-15                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-16                             
    daily.cvd      Adware.OSX                                   
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashfake.Java                           
    daily.cvd      OSX.Defma                                    
    daily.cvd      MacOSX.Revir-1                               
    daily.cvd      OSX.BlackHol                                 
    daily.cvd      OSX.BlackHol-1                               
    daily.cvd      MacOSX.iMuler-1                              
    daily.cvd      Trojan.OSX.FlashBack.A                       
    daily.cvd      OSX.DevilRobber                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-5                              
    daily.cvd      Trojan.OSX.Imuler                            
    daily.cvd      OSX.Word.Malware                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Word.Malware-1                           
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-8                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-10                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-12                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-9                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-13                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-14                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashfake                                
    daily.cvd      OSX.SubPub                                   
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-19                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-20                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Maljava                                  
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-21                             
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashfake-1                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashfake-2                              
    daily.cvd      OSX.Flashback-22                             
    main.cvd       OSX.RSPlug                                   
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.iservices.A                       
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.iservices.B                       
    main.cvd       OSX.DNSChanger.dmg                           
    main.cvd       OSX.DNSChanger.dmg-1                         
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.F.dmg                      
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.F.dmg-1                    
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.F.dmg-2                    
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.F.dmg-3                    
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.F.dmg-4                    
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.F.dmg-5                    
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.G.dmg                      
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.G                          
    main.cvd       Exploit.OSX.Safari                           
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.Cowhand                           
    main.cvd       Backdoor.OSX.BlackHole                       
    main.cvd       Trojan.Downloader.OSX                        
    main.cvd       OSX.Flashback                                
    main.cvd       Trojan.Downloader.OSX-1                      
    main.cvd       OSX.DNSChanger                               
    main.cvd       OSX.Trojan-2                                 
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.Opener                            
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.C                          
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.RSPlug.D                          
    main.cvd       OSX.Tored                                    
    main.cvd       OSX.RSPlug-2                                 
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.OpinionSpy.B                      
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.OpinionSpy.A                      
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.MacDefender                       
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.MacDefender.B                     
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.MacDefender.C                     
    main.cvd       OSX.Defma-1                                  
    main.cvd       OSX.Defma-2                                  
    main.cvd       Trojan.OSX.MacBack                           
    main.cvd       Trojan-Downloader.OSX.Fav.A                  
    main.cvd       Trojan-Downloader.OSX.Fav.B


    ----------

    Tell you what Mal, you show me the fact finding.

    I don't know if this is bogus and a liar as well.

    MacScan offers Privacy & Security for Mac OS X

    MacScan offers protection against malware and privacy threats such as trojan horses, keystroke loggers, dialer applications and spyware. MacScan also detects commercially available software that may allow for remote access to the computer or violate privacy and security.

    To learn more about the types of software detected click below.

    Below is a list of spyware, keystroke loggers, dialer applications, remote administrative applications, trojan horses and other malware MacScan identifies and protects against.
    Recently Added
    Code:
    AceSpy 1.0
    Refog Keylogger 1.4.420
    Refog Personal Monitor 1.4.420
    SniperSpy 1.0
    SniperSpy 1.0a
    
    MacScan Detection List
    Instant Access Dialer
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    SpyMe
    Remote Admin Program
    OSX
    Spector Pro 2010
    Keylogger
    OSX
    KeyBag
    Keylogger
    OSX
    TypeRecorder
    Keylogger
    Classic
    Keyboard Spy
    Keylogger
    OSX
    MAC Defender
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Kidlogger
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Keystroke Recorder
    Keylogger
    Classic
    trojan.osx.boonana
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Agent Bob
    Keylogger
    OSX
    MacLifeInsurance
    Keylogger
    Classic
    TypeRecorder X
    Keylogger
    OSX
    CarbonKeys
    Keylogger
    OSX
    BlazingTools Perfect Keylogger
    Keylogger
    OSX
    OSXvnc
    Remote Admin Program
    OSX
    Screenshots Remote
    Spyware
    OSX
    TextMeleon
    Keylogger
    OSX
    DevilRobber Trojan Horse
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    KeystrokeRecorder X
    Keylogger
    OSX
    EZmal
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Tsunami Trojan Horse
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    DNSChanger
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    SniperSpy
    Keylogger
    OSX
    AceSpy
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Spector
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Amac Keylogger
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Refog Personal Monitor
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Refog Keylogger
    Keylogger
    OSX
    DutyWatch Remote
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Qhosts Trojan Horse
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Olyx
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Imuler
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    HellRaiser
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    TIFF Vulnerability
    Exploit
    OSX
    Aobo Keylogger
    Keylogger
    OSX
    BlackHole RAT
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Tored
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Invisible Oasis
    Keylogger
    Classic
    Spy
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Termite(OS9)
    Trojan Horse
    Classic
    Monitorer
    Keylogger
    Classic
    Spector Pro 2009
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Super Save
    Keylogger
    Classic
    Keybag Pro
    Keylogger
    OSX
    TypeAgent
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Aobo Keylogger Pro
    Keylogger
    OSX
    MonitorerX Pro
    Keylogger
    OSX
    TakeDown Suite
    Trojan Horse
    Classic
    iMunizator
    Scareware
    OSX
    Last Resort
    Keylogger
    Classic
    KeystrokesWatch
    Keylogger
    OSX
    BackTrack
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Keyboard and Mouse Recorder
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Termite(OSX)
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Xover
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Monitorer X
    Keylogger
    OSX
    TextTrap
    Keylogger
    Classic
    PokerStealer
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    TypeSaver
    Keylogger
    Classic
    Mac Remote Control
    Remote Admin Program
    OSX
    KeyCaptor
    Keylogger
    OSX
    AppleScript.THT
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Lose Lose
    Malware
    OSX
    DutyWatch
    Keylogger
    OSX
    Keylogger
    Keylogger
    OSX
    FlashBack Trojan Horse
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    UnderHand
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    Peeping Tom
    Keylogger
    Classic
    eWatch
    Trojan Horse
    OSX
    KeyStroke
    Keylogger
    Classic
    
    Mac Spyware Definitions

    Spyware - Spyware is a generic term for any program that takes your personal information and stores it on your computer or sends it out to the internet for retrieval by a third party. There are a few different types of individual spyware programs, including keyloggers, trojan horses, dialer applications, remote administration programs, as well as tracking cookies. Spyware can exhibit a combination of traits found in trojan horses, keyloggers, and remote administration programs, and these programs are considered hybrid spyware.

    Keystroke Loggers - MacScan detects against keystroke loggers, also known as keyloggers, keystroke recorders, key nabbers, key loggers or key capture programs. When a keystroke logger is installed, keystrokes are recorded — capturing data such as usernames, passwords, credit card numbers, social security numbers, personal data and other information typed. The data may be logged to a file for later retrieval or transfered over the Internet.

    MacScan detects both commercially available keystroke recorders as well as keyloggers released by hackers. Although many of the commercially available keystroke recorders are marketed to parents as a way to monitor their children on the internet, many of these programs can be used in the same manner to spy on others without consent. Scenarios may include shared use computers (school, office, cyber cafes) and corporate espionage.

    Trojan Horses - Trojan Horses are malicious programs that are disguised as innocent files, usually run invisibly on your system, and enable a remote attacker to transfer files to and from your computer, delete your files, and view your sensitive information. The DNSChanger trojan horse, which recently attacked OS X, can intercept the websites you are attempting to visit, and redirect you to malicious websites which will steal your login information.


    Code:
    
    


    ----------

    Are this lies from Kaspersky as well???

    https://www.securelist.com/en/descriptions?words=osx&behavior=&Search=Search&search_type=1

    And from Ikarus Antivirus. Is this a lie as well??? You tell me.
    Code:
        Exploit.OSX.Safari.a
        Worm.OSX.Inqtana.a
        Java.OSX.Inqtana
        Worm.OSX.Niqtana.a
        Virus.OSX.Macarena.a
        Trojan.Osx.Exploit.Launchd.B
        Trojan.Osx.Exploit.Launchd.A
        Trojan.OSX.Imunizator
        Virus.OSX.Leap.B
        Trojan.OSX.Loader.A
        Hoax.OSX.Mcsweeper.a
        Virus.OSX.Niqtana.D
        Virus.OSX.Macarena
        Worm.OSX.Inqtana
        Exploit.OSX.Safari
        Exploit.OSX.Launch
        Trojan.OSX.Dropper
        Trojan.OSX.Loader
        Hoax.OSX.Mcsweeper
        JS.OSX.Troj
        Trojan-Downloader.OSX.Jahlav
        Virus.OSX.RSPlug
        Virus.OSX.Weapox
        Backdoor.OSX.Lamzev
        Trojan.OSX.Jahlav
        Trojan.Osx.Exploit.Launchd
        Trojan-PWS.OSX.Corpref
        OSX.Trojan-PWS.Corpref
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.DNSChanger
        IM-Worm.OSX.Leap
        Worm.OSX.Niqtana
        Win32.Worm.Osx.Niqtana
        Trojan.Exploit.Osx.Launch
        Rootkit.OSX.Weapox
        Trojan.Osx.Weapox
        Suspect.OSX.iWorkS
        Backdoor.OSX.iWorm
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.Krowi
        Virus.OSX.Niqtana
        not-a-virus:FraudTool.OSX.iMunizator
        OSX.Worm.Tored
        Worm.OSX.Tored
        Email-Worm.OSX.Tored
        Exploit.OSX.Libtiff
        Exploit.OSX.Smid
        not-a-virus:Monitor.OSX.Keylogger
        Trojan.OSX.Gaslome
        not-a-virus:RiskTool.OSX.Baoba
        Trojan.OSX.HellRTS
        not-a-virus:NetTool.OSX.Mech
        Backdoor.OSX.Reshe
        not-a-virus:RemoteAdmin.OSX.Cowhand
        Trojan.OSX.Spynion
        Backdoor.OSX.Sunam
        Trojan.OSX.Inqtana
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.Boonana
        Trojan.OSX.Launchd
        MAC.OSX.Spyware.OpinionSpy
        Backdoor.OSX.BlackHol
        Hoax.OSX.Defma
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.A
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.B
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.C
        Trojan-Downloader.OSX.FavDonw
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert
        MAC.OSX.Backdoor.BlackHol
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.D
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.F
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.G
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.E
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.H
        Backdoor.OSX.Olyx
        MAC.OSX.AdWare.MacSweeper
        Backdoor.OSX.Imuler
        Trojan-Dropper.OSX.Revir
        Trojan-Downloader.OSX.Revir
        Trojan-Downloader.OSX.Flashfake
        Application.Osx.Cosmac
        MAC.OSX.Backdoor.Tsunami
        Trojan.OSX.Agent
        Backdoor.OSX.Miner
        Trojan.OSX.Miner
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.DevilRobber
        Application.Posx
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FlashBack
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.I
        MAC.OSX.Backdoor.Olyx
        OSX.Niqtana
        Hoax.OSX.MacKeeper
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.FakeAlert.J
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.Imuler
        MAC.OSX.Trojan.Lamadai
        Backdoor.OSX.MaControl
        not-a-virus:Monitor.OSX.LogKext
        not-a-virus:Monitor.OSX.SniPo
        OSX.Weapox
        OSX.Safari
        Backdoor.OSX.SabPub
        Backdoor.OSX.Flashback
        not-a-virus:Monitor.OSX.BackTrack
        Backdoor.OSX.Lasyr


    ----------

    I don't know again. Is this one of the typical American lying to it's citizen?

    http://www.intego.com/mac-security-blog/

    Oh yeah another conspiracy theories right.

    https://home.mcafee.com/VirusInfo/ThreatSearch.aspx?term=osx

    So don't confuse me with facts and fiction.

    If you got windows virus on your mac, I know it will not get infected.

    But Java???

    I know that one of my friend is a Java programmer. He did told me that Java runs all platform. If you install JAVA in your OS.

    You can run Java programs in Linux, Windows, Solaris & Mac OS X!

    So are you telling me that Java program with malicious intend cannot get infected by MAC OS X?

    Well are you telling me again that Mac OS X is a superior beings in this world?

    I do not know what are you trying to imply here.

    Well those guys who are working in a Security Firm is a perpetual liar. is this what you trying to say to me.

    How the heck they got the job???
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #11
    Not a single item in your ridiculously long post is a Mac OS X virus, since none have ever existed in the wild. Users who follow the safe computing practices I posted earlier are completely protected against all Mac OS X malware that has ever existed in the wild. In other words, by prudent action, users can avoid ALL Mac OS X malware that has ever existed, without the need for any antivirus app. On the contrary, many users who didn't practice safe computing but did have antivirus installed were infected by malware that the AV apps didn't detect.

    The rest of your post makes no sense at all. The link I posted from infowars was just one of many sources reporting the same facts about those school computers. Google it yourself and learn the truth.

    Over the past few years I've seen plenty of newcomers join the forum to post nonsense like you have, trying to stir up fear and worry among users, then they disappear again, having accomplished nothing but demonstrating how uninformed they are. It would be extremely wise of you to quit while you're ahead, but, of course, I'm not expecting you to exercise that much wisdom.
     
  12. betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #12
    I dead confuse now. So you are telling me that even US Homeland Security (us-cert.gov) that teach how to secure you computer is also a perpetual liar!

    ----------

    I know that since long ago. But many Mac users install wares!

    ----------

    Aren't those Mac OS X known virus which detected by antivirus companies???

    Interesting I follow your steps in your guide.
     
  13. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #13
    Antivirus software doesn't protect against all foolish user actions. Rather than post long lists of malware (most of which are either repetitive variations of the dozen or so existing trojans or they are keyloggers, which cannot be installed without user permission), simply practice safe computing and stop hyping the suggestion that antivirus is required or completely effective in protecting against malware.
    No. Not a single one is a Mac OS X virus. There has never been one released in the wild. Go back and read my first post in this thread, as well as the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ, so you'll understand the difference between various forms of malware.
     
  14. betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #14
    Fine! I follow your word for it! I'll switch to BSD!

    ----------

    That encourge someone at home to Remote Control my Mac and install SSH, Kerberos. Even I turn 40s, he turn on Parental Control in my root account!
    Copy everything in root, and changes everything when I'm not around.

    How am I supposed to protect from this happening from him!

    Can you teach me, any good free software to lock this guys out! From physical access to my Mac?
     
  15. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #15
    Use passwords on your computer, or take it with you when you leave, if it's a portable. Or buy a safe and lock it in the safe. There is no completely effective protection if someone knowledgeable has physical access to your computer. Personally, I wouldn't live with anyone I couldn't trust.
     
  16. Mal macrumors 603

    Mal

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2002
    Location:
    Orlando
    #16
    betatest, I've ignored you before, but your posts are ridiculous and I sincerely feel a need to combat your misinformation. You also need to post in clear English, instead of ridiculously long one-liners that don't even make grammatical sense, much less actually logical sense. Instead of posting links to lists of meaningless names from antivirus companies trying to sell their software, please try to read and understand the information that GGJstudios has posted all over the board. You also keep bringing up the story of someone who has supposedly remotely accessed your computer, despite the clear evidence provided in that thread that you are completely misunderstanding what is going on. I don't begrudge you a lack of knowledge, because there are certainly things I know very little if anything about, but please spend more time listening and trying to understand instead of posting misinformation because you don't understand the basics. We'll gladly try to help you understand, but you have to do your part to learn.

    jW
     
  17. MonkeySee.... macrumors 68040

    MonkeySee....

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #17
    Amazing thread guys. Funny and worrying to read.
     
  18. betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #18
  19. MonkeySee.... macrumors 68040

    MonkeySee....

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #19
    That guy looks a bit......slow.
     
  20. betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #20
    Yeah a self denial.

    This is a school that teaches about computer security.

    If you think this is baseless and a hype ignore it. Otherwise, download see the file and read.

    If you are not blind. See! If you are blind. Use a braille.

    https://www.sans.org/reading_room/whitepapers/forensics/mac-os-malware-analysis_33178

    ----------

    See if Kevin Mitnick can hack your Mac in 2 Minutes! Or better still asked Gary Mckinnon. LOL!
     
  21. MonkeySee.... macrumors 68040

    MonkeySee....

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #21
    Why would I want someone to hack my Mac?
     
  22. betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #22
    Just a figure of speech.

    Well I have found a link to be useful as compared to the one in the guide.macrumors.com pertaining to malware.

    This person knows better. And I trusted him more. And none that he wrote is a hype!

    https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-3291

    The guy who posted in the Apple Support forum talks facts.

    See ... what he says here... under the section

    Hardening your Mac and yourself to prevent future attacks.

    And he says, and I quote:-

    "la la de da, I have a Mac and nothing can hurt me, because Mac's never get viruses"

    Don't think like that any longer, Mac's have been attacked, not as frequently or as easily as Windows, and not by viruses mainly, but through other means like trojans and driveby attacks on browsers and plug-ins.

    Nothing gives hackers more pleasure (and a challenge) than to beat cocky Mac users behind and root their machines en massé like what has occurred with the Flashflake botnet and other Mac based botnets in the past.

    -
     
  23. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #23
    How do you know he knows better? And how do you know that none of what he wrote is hype? And what "hype" did you find in the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ?
    For Mac OS X, not by viruses ever. And no one has suggested that you not take steps to protect your Mac. Read the safe computing suggestions I posted earlier, that also appear in the FAQ. Practicing those will completely protect you from any Mac OS X malware that has ever existed in the wild. Installing an antivirus app will not add any protection that safe computing doesn't provide.
    Any Mac user that practiced those safe computing tips was completely unaffected by the Flashback trojan.
     
  24. S-mac-k macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    #24
    Me being a bit special

    Basically, been reading this thread. I have sent a load of emails recently to companies requesting quotes for this & that. I then get an email from this company saying I've subscribed to a mailing list. Click this link to unsubscribe. Me being soft & it being late, I tried to press the button to unsubscribe thinking I've accidentally subscribed to something? The reason being, on some of the sites there were buttons to uncheck otherwise I'd automatically subscribe to their crap which I obviously don't want.

    To cut a long story, I click link, blank page comes up & nothing happens? Nothing loads? I'm upstairs in the top of my house thinking its a poor connection? Nope. I thought ****. I've seen this before. This happened to me when I had a pc. I tried to open on my iphone. Same scenario.

    What is going on? Do I now have an infected mac? Is this a trojan/malware programme for a pc? How do I check to see whether I've got a virus, trojan or any malicious software on my mac? No virus exist in wild etc, but what about keyloggers etc?

    I followed most the steps in the guide provided earlier in the thread but I still can't help but feel I'm now infected & I want to find out if I am or not. If so, I want to throw petrol on whoever developed the programme & throw them a light.

    Please help
     
  25. betatest, Jun 2, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2012

    betatest macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    #25
    You should have not click that link from your email. Next time if you have any of those email. Trash them. Do not open it.

    You need to isolate one at a time.

    By the way, did you check your Wifi Router settings are okay???

    First off, check your Windows PC is infected by this virus.

    If you have a reputable antivirus program and it is of the current version make sure you have it updated.

    Do a full scan.

    If you have an outdated and not having a current version of antivirus for your Windows PC, uninstall that and use a free version. Like Avira or Microsoft Security Essentials.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/products/security-essentials
    https://www.avira.com/en/downloads#home

    Download Malwarebytes to check if your system is infected by any malware.
    http://www.malwarebytes.org/

    Do a full scan with Malwarebytes.

    Or try Hitman pro.
    http://www.surfright.nl/en

    Also check whether your Windows hosts files are changed.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/972034

    Check to see if any of DNS settings are being changed under your network settings of your Windows PC.

    Look at your Windows task manager. See if you suspect any file.
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323527

    Do a msconfig.
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310560

    You can check for any potential rootkit in your Windows PC.
    By downloading.
    http://support.kaspersky.com/faq/?qid=208283363

    On a mac, check your DNS settings under your network configuration.
    see if it is being changed. Check your network settings if anything have been changed.

    check to see if you are infect by DNS Changer malware via this link.

    https://www.us-cert.gov/current/archive/2012/04/24/archive.html#dnschanger_malware
    http://www.dcwg.org/detect/
    http://www.dns-ok.us/

    check the fix for this malware
    http://www.dcwg.org/fix/
     
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